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ANNUAL REPORT 
1989 

SWAMPSCOTT 
MASSACHUSETTS 



WHITE COURT/MARIAN COURT 

Overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, White Court/Marian Court is located on 
Swampscott's prestigious Little's Point. The stately white-pillared mansion, 
originally named, "White Court," had been constructed in the late 1890's by 
Frederick E. Smith. In 1 925, it became the summer White House of President Calvin 
Coolidge and his wife, Grace, who spent the summer here next door to their close 
friend, Frank W. Stearns. White Court was sold to Mr. Timothy Falvey by Donald 
H. Smith in 1928. The Falvey family carried out elaborate plans for their year-round 
home, added several areas and redecorated the rooms as they are seen today. 

In 1954, the Congregation of the Sisters of Mercy of New Hampshire 
purchased the six-acre estate from Wallace and Donald Falvey, and renamed it, 
"Marian Court," in honor of the Marian year proclaimed in 1954 by Pope Pius 
XII. At the time, the newly acquired mansion was utilized as a training center for 
those postulants beginning religious life with the Sisters of Mercy. 

A day school was founded at the same time, and many children ran happily 
across the lawns and through the estate in those days. Then the decision was 
made to close the day school in favor of a secretarial school. 

The institution opened as a secretarial school in 1964. In 1981 , Marian Court 
changed its status from a secretarial school to a junior college and was authorized 
by the Massachusetts Board of Regents of Higher Education to grant the Associate 
Degree and changed its name to Marian Court Junior College. 

This anniversary year of 1989-1990, Marian Court Junior College celebrates 
and reflects on the traditions and ideals that have shaped the college for the past 
twenty-five years. As a caring community composed of individuals of diverse ages 
and backgrounds, we respect and appreciate a reverence for all creation, believe 
in the inherent dignity and value of every person, and share a commitment to social 
justice for all people. As we move toward the future, our continued goal will be 
to carry on the mission of the education of women, one of the major works of the 
Sisters of Mercy since they were founded in Ireland by Catherine McAuley in 1831 , 
to strengthen our ideals, to contribute to our immediate surroundings and to the 
larger world in which we live, and to dedicate our individual identities toward fulfilling 
the promise begun at Marian Court. 



One Hundred and Thirty-Eighth 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the Town Officers 

SWAMPSCOTT 

MASSACHUSETTS 



for the year ending December 31, 1989 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Swampscott was incorporated as a Town on May 21, 1852 
Situation: About 15 Miles northeast of Boston 

Population: State Census 1989, 13,893-Persons of all ages taken every year in 

Town Census 
Area: 3.05 square miles 
Assessed Valuation: $1,076,015,773 
Tax Rate: $ 9.23 Residential and Open Space 

$14.43 Commercial and Industrial 

$14.43 Personal 

Form of Government: Representative Town Meeting (Accepted May 17, 1927. 

First meeting held February 27, 1928.) 
Governing Body of Town: Board of Selectmen 
Elihu Thomson Administration Building: 22 Monument Avenue 
Governor: Michael Dukakis 
Attorney General: James M. Shannon 
Secretary of the Commonwealth: Michael J. Connelly 
State Legislative Body: (Representing Swampscott) 

Senator Walter J. Boverini of Lynn (1st Essex District) 
Representative Lawrence R. Alexander (8th Essex 
District) is the Representative in the General Court 
United States Congress: (Massachusetts Representatives) 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy 
Senator John F. Kerry 
Representative in Congress: Nicholas Mavroules (6th Congressional District) 
Member of Governor's Council: John F. Markey of North Andover (5th District) 
Qualifications of voters: Must be 18 years of age, born in United States or fully 

naturalized in accordance with the provisions in Chapter 587, Acts of 1972 

and Chapter 853, Acts of 1973, there is no duration residential requirement 

for "who is a resident in the city or town where he claims the right to vote 

at the time he registers" may be registered. 
Registration: Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 12 Noon, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 

p.m. Friday 8:30 a.m. to 1 :00 p.m. These hours are subject to change. Special 

sessions held preceding elections. 
Where to Vote: Precinct 1-Machon School on Burpee Road 

2- Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue side 
adjoining Abbott Park 

3- Central Fire Station, Burrill Street 

4- Hadley School on Redington Street 
5 & 6-High School on Forest Avenue 

Tax bills: Tax bills for the Fiscal Year (July 1 through June 30) are due and Payable 
July 1 . If one-half of the tax bill, plus betterments, is not paid by November 1 , 
interest will be assessed from October 1 . If the remaining one-half of the tax 
bill is not paid by May 1 , interest will be assessed from April 1 . 



TOWN OFFICERS - 1989 
ELECTED 



MODERATOR 

Martin C. Goldman (1990) 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
Robert E. Perry, Chairman (1990) 
Peter R. Beatrice, III (1990) 
Daniel R. Santanello (1990) 
Thomas H. Driscoll* (1990) 
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. (1990) 
James L. Rudolph (1990) 

TOWN CLERK AND COLLECTOR 
Jack L. Paster (1991) 

TOWN TREASURER 
Jack L. Paster (1992) 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Vera C. Harrington, Chairman (1990) 
Anthony Benevento (1991) 
Ernest Mazola (1992) 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Daniel P. Kelly, Chairman (1991) 
Kevin G. Gookin (1992) 
David L. Phillips (1990) 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Henry S. Dembowski, Chairman (1991) 
Richard R. Feinberg (1990) 
Robert L. Ingram (1990) 
Sandra T. Rotner (1992) 
Mary Lou B. Sheer (1992) 

TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Kathy Epstein, Chairman (1990) 
Carole B. Shutzer (1991) 
Paul C. Wermuth (1992) 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Robert W. Murphy, Chairman (1990) 



Theodore A. Dushan, M.D. (1992) 

Steven H. Lefkowitz, M.D. (1991) 

CONSTABLES 

William E. Eldridge (1992) 

Arline Maguire (1992) 

Paul Minsky (1992) 

PLANNING BOARD 

Eugene Barden, Chairman (1993) 

Peter R. Beatrice, Jr. (1992) 

Vincent R. DiLisio (1990) 

Veeder C. Nellis (1991) 

Brian T. Watson (1994) 
SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING 
AUTHORITY 

Margaret Kelly, Chairman (1993) 

Albert DiLisio (1991) 

Barbara F. Eldridge (1990) 

Michael Palleschi (1994) 
John F. O'Hare, 

State Appointee (1991) 
COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST 
FUNDS 

Louis A. Gallo (1990) 

Edward Krippendorf (1991) 

Carl D. Reardon (1992) 



Dates indicate expiration of term. 
* Deceased— August 13, 1989 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Keith A. Callahan 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 
S. Josette Parisi 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
Francis A. Dube (1990) 

BARGAINING AGENT 
Alan Kaplan, Esq. (1990) 
INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 
AND INSPECTOR OF SMOKE 
Louis Gallo (1990) 
ALTERNATE INSPECTOR OF 
BUILDINGS 
Kathleen Magee (1990) 
Richard T. Mcintosh (1990) 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Richard E. Maitland (1990) 



CONSTABLE TO POST 
WARRANTS AND OTHER 
SIMILAR WORK 

Arline Maquire (1990) 
CONSTABLES FOR SERVING 
CIVIL PROCESS 

Junior Clark (1992) 
David H. Janes (1992) 
Joseph H. Kukas (1992) 
Edward F. Riccio (1992) 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Arthur Palleschi, Esq. (1990) 

SENIOR BUILDING CUSTODIAN 
Edward F. Riccio 

FENCE VIEWERS 
Robert E. Perry (1990) 
Louis Gallo (1990) 
Donald G. Brewer (1990) 



— 4 — 



CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
AND FOREST WARDEN 

William R. Hyde 

DATA PROCESSING 



COORDINATOR 

Keith A. Callahan (1990) 

HARBORMASTER 

Lawrence P. Bithell (1990) 
ASSISTANT HARBORMASTERS 

John T. Cawley (1990) 

William W. Guay (1990) 

William F. Hennessey (1990) 

Donald R. Peterson, Jr. (1990) 

PARKING AGENT 

John Bolduc (1990) 



CHIEF OF POLICE AND 
KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 

Peter J. Cassidy 
Captain John E. Toomey 

SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

Lawrence P. Bithell (1990) 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 
COMMITTEE 

Arthur J. Palleschi (1990) 
Keith A. Callahan (1990) 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
Martin S. Plum, Chairman (1992) 
Herman Goodwin (1991) 
Roberta Kaloust (1991) 
James T. Kapoll (1990) 
Vincent P. O'Brien (1992) 
Lorraine F. Pelletier (1992) 
Ruth Roche (1992) 
Alice Jane Winston (1992) 
AMBULANCE OVERSIGHT 
COMMITTEE 
Kevin F. Breen, Secretary (1990) 
Jeanne Butler (1990) 
Martin S. Plum (1990) 
Howard E. Rotner, M.D. (1990) 
Christine M. Wilson (1990) 
Richard Wilson (1990) 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 
Ann M. Whittemore, Chairman (1992) 
Charles H. Hall (1993) 
Charles E. Morrison (1994) 
William L. O'Brien (1990) 
Kenneth B. Shutzer (1991) 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
Anthony Pasciuto (1991) 
Peter Shribman (1990) 



ASSISTANT SHELLFISH 
CONSTABLES 

Joseph C. Cardillo (1990) 
Joseph H. Monahan (1990) 
Edward Publicover (1990) 
Carl D. Reardon (1990) 

TREE WARDEN 
Donald G. Brewer (1990) 
VETERANS' SERVICES AGENT 
AND GRAVES OFFICER AND 
BURIAL AGENT 
Charles E. Popp, Jr. (1990) 
WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



INSPECTOR 

John F. O'Hare 

WIRE INSPECTOR 
Daniel Cahill (1990) 

ASSISTANT WIRE INSPECTOR 
Roger B. Farwell (1990) 
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 
AGENT 

Arthur J. Palleschi, Esq. (1990) 

ARTS COUNCIL 

Cindy Madfis Blonder, 

Chairperson (1991) 

Catherine G.S. Cassidy (1990) 

Anna Irvine (1990) 

Jane MacDonald (1990) 

Esther Mulroy (1990) 

Rozelda Olanoff (1990) 

Pamela J. Riffin (1991) 

Agnes Raymond (1990) 

Whitney L. White (1990) 

Alice Jane Winston (1990) 

BIKEWAY COMMITTEE 

Mary Powers, Chairman (1990) 
BUILDING CODE BOARD 
OF APPEALS 
Richard T. Mcintosh, 

Chairman (1990) 

David Fried (1991) 

Richard P. Mayor (1990) 

Richard N. Pierro (1993) 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Charles R. Borgioli, Chairman (1990) 

Louise LaConte (1990) 

Bruce Gordon (1990) 

Ken Maas (1990) 

Gary G. Young, Ph.D. (1990) 

Paula R. Mariano (1990) 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN 



-5- 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Sarah R Ingalls, Chairman (1992) 
David DiLisio (1992) 
Harold J. Keating.lll (1990) 
Dr. Richard R Mayor (1991) 
David M. McCarthy (1992) 
Lawrence R Picariello (1992) 
DESIGN SELECTION COMMITTEE 
Thomas Kiley, Chairman (1990) 
James Harris (1990) 
Dino Stati (1990) 
BOARD OF ELECTION 
COMMISSIONERS 
Francis Mancini, Chairman (1990) 
Marguerite A. Cunningham (1993) 
Timothy Davern (1992) 
Theodore A. Patrikis (1992) 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 
W.A. Weaver, Chairman (1990) 
HARBOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Joseph Monahan, Chairman (1990) 
Lawrence P. Bithell (1990) 
Arthur B. Freedman, DVM (1990) 
Robert V. Grimes (1990) 
William W. Guay (1990) 
William R Hennessey (1990) 
Kent F. Murphy (1990) 
John J. O'Shea (1990) 
Louis D. Williams (1990) 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Louis A. Gallo, Chairman (1990) 
Nancy Cropley-Backstrom (1990) 
Sylvia B. Belkin (1991) 
David Callahan (1992) 
Douglas Maitland (1990) 
Marilyn Margulius (1992) 
Donald J. Warnock (1991) 
COMMITTEE TO STUDY 

INSTALLATION OF AUTOMATIC 
SPRINKLERS IN NEW 

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION 
John Doherty, Chairman (1990) 
Kathleen Magee (1990) 
Peter Shribman (1990) 
INSURANCE ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 
Paul R. Nestor, Jr., Chairman (1990) 
Robert E. Perry (1990) 
Charles E. Thornton (1990) 

JFK MEMORIAL STATUE FUND 
COMMITTEE 
William R. DiMento, Chairman 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Charles Popp, Jr., Chairman (1990) 
Genevieve D'Agnese (1990) 
William McDermott (1990) 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Precinct 3 Andrew Holmes, Chairman (1990) 
Precinct 1 Richard Dedrick (1990) 
Precinct 2 Bernard O. Bloom (1990) 
Precinct 4 Sherman Freedman (1991) 
Precinct 5 Marie J. Clarke (1991) 
Precinct 6 Sylvia Stamell (1992) 
John Hughes, Jr., Member-At-Large 
RESIDENT/COMMUTER 
PARKING COMMITTEE 
Chloe Johnson, Chairman (1990) 
Theresa Conville (1990) 
Donald W. Gardner (1990) 
Bruce Guzowski (1990) 
Barbara Schaefer (1990) 
Dr. Angela Gambale Warner (1990) 
Robert E. Perry, Ex-officio 

SAFETY/SECURITY COMMITTEE 
Jacqueline Blanchard (1990) 
Donald G. Brewer (1990) 
Chief William R. Hyde (1990) 
Paul R. Nestor, Jr. (1990) 
Captain John E. Toomey (1990) 

TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 
William H. McCarty, Chairman (1990) 
Louise LaConte (1990) 
Michael A. Palleschi (1990) 
Lt. John Alex, Ex-Officio (1990) 

VETERANS DAY COMMITTEE 
Charles Popp, Jr., Chairman (1990) 
James S. Fenelon (1990) 
Fred P. Fried (1990) 
Gerald D. Spencer, Jr. (1990) 
VIETNAM MEMORIAL COMMITTEE 
Robert E. Perry (1990) 

WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND COMMITTEE 
Ernest Manchin, Chairman (1992) 
Joseph J. Balsama (1992) 
Philip A. Brine, Jr. (1992) 
Mary W. Cooper (1990) 
Patsy Losano (1990) 
David Sherman (1991) 
Thomas B. White (1992) 

ASSOCIATE TRUSTEES 
Paul E. Garland (1992) 
Keith L. Jordan (1992) 
James H. Lilly (1992) 
Daniel R. Santanello (1992) 
Charles Popp, Jr., Ex-Officio 



6 



REPRESENTATIVES, LIAISONS, DESIGNEES, 
COORDINATORS 



CLEAN AIR COORDINATOR 
OIL SPILL COORDINATOR 

Kent F. Murphy 

HAZARDOUS WASTE 
COORDINATOR 
Kent F. Murphy 
Mark Thompson 

MASSACHUSETTS BAY 
TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY 
BOARD 
Richard Patoski 
Robert E. Perry 
Carl D. Reardon 

LABOR SERVICE COORDINATOR 
Keith A. Callahan 

ESSEX COUNTY ADVISORY 
BOARD 
Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 

APPOINTED BY 

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

Richard H. Salter, Chairman 

Bette Anne Babcock 

Susan E. Burke 

Jack L. Paster 

Gerard D. Perry 

Carl D. Reardon, Ex-officio 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Gerard D. Perry, Chairman 

At-Large (1992) 
Eugene R Nigrelli, Precinct 1 (1990) 
Walter E. Newhall, Jr., Precinct 2(1990) 
Mark J. Thompson, Precinct 3 (1990) 
Janet Baker, Precinct 4 (1991) 
Howard M. Vatcher, Precinct 5 (1991) 
Irwin F. Cohen, Precinct 6 (1992) 
Richard Salter, At Lareg (1992) 
Robert E. McVie, Secretary 

ROLAND C. BOOMA RINK 
COMMITTEE 
Francis J. Cassidy 
Ferdinand L. Carangelo 
Malcolm F. MacLean, Jr.* 



MASSACHUSETTS WATER 
RESOURCES AUTHORITY 
REPRESENTATIVE 

Donald G. Brewer 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING 
COUNCIL 

Robert E. Perry 
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON 
DISABILITY LIAISON 
Carl D. Reardon 

RIGHT-TO-KNOW LAW 
COORDINATOR 
Kent F. Murphy 

WINTER PLANNING 
COORDINATOR 
Robert E. Perry 



THE MODERATOR 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY REPAIRS 
AT THE PHILLIPS BEACH 
FIRE STATION 

Louis Frisch 
Fred Ribicandria 
Dr. Arthur Schwartz 
Fred Speranza 
Alan Kline, Ex-officio 

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
PLANNING COMMITTEE 
Sandra Rotner 
Joanne Wennik 
Francis A. York 

SAWTELLE PROPERTY AND 
PHILLIPS PARK COMPLEX 
STUDY COMMITTEE 
Donald Babcock, Chairman 
Richard G. Baker 
Peter R. Beatrice, III 
Arthur Goldberg 
Andrew B. Holmes 

SALARY STUDY COMMITTEE 
Paul E. Garland 
Walter E. Newhall 
Gayle Stoll 
Michael K. Devlin 
Melvin A. Karas 

* Deceased 



- 7- 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN AND MODERATOR 
PERSONNEL BOARD 



Paul E. Garland, Chairman (1991) 

Ann M. Whittemore, Clerk (1992) 

Richard C. Bane (1990) 

Peter C. McCarriston (1991) 

Keith A. Callahan, Employees' Representative (1991) 



APPOINTED BY THE MASS. EMERGENCY 
RESPONSE COMMISSION 

EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMITTEE-1989 

Robert E. Perry, Chairman, Board of Selectmen 

Peter J. Cassidy, Chief, Police Department 

William R. Hyde, Chief, Fire Department 

Sarah P. Ingalls, Chairman, Conservation Commission 

Richard E. Maitland, Civil Defense Director 

Kent F. Murphy, Health Officer 

Donald G. Brewer, Public Works Supervisor 

APPOINTED BY PROBATE COURT 

ROLAND JACKSON MEDICAL SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Reverend John A. Barrett 
Dr. Robert Bessom 
Dr. Richard K. Chrystal 

APPOINTED BY BOARD OF HEALTH 

HEALTH OFFICER: Kent F. Murphy 
APPOINTED BY INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

GAS & PLUMBING INSPECTOR: Peter McCarriston 
ASSISTANT INSPECTOR: Richard A. Mclntire 

APPOINTED BY BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND 
ENGINEER:Donald G. Brewer 

APPOINTED BY CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD 
AND ELECTED BY TOWN EMPLOYEES 

CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD: 

Edward F. Riccio, Chairman, Elected by Employees (1990) 
Thomas F. Maloney, Appointed by Retirement Board (1990) 
Keith A. Callahan, Secretary, Ex-Officio Member 

APPOINTED BY TOWN TREASURER WITH APPROVAL OF 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ASSISTANT TREASURER: Barbara Bickford 
APPOINTED BY TOWN CLERK AND COLLECTOR 

ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS: 

Carol A. McNelley and Catherine L. Woods 
To receive Notices of Intention of Marriage and to administer The Oath of Office 
to persons appointed or elected to boards, committees or commissions within the 
Town of Swampscott. 



-8- 



APPOINTED OR ELECTED BY ORGANIZATIONS 
OF THE EMPLOYEES AFFECTED 
GROUP INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Lt. Paul Sherry, Police Dept. Representative 
John M. Chaisson, Fire Dept. Representative 
Louis A. Gallo, Library Representative 
Judith Kenney, School Representative 
Margaret Sullivan, Town Hall Representative 

Carl D. Reardon, Dept. of Public Works, and Custodians Representative 



SUBCOMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
TO STUDY THE RENOVATION OF 
BLOCKSIDGE PARK FIELD HOUSE 



Thomas Belhumeur 



Paul Gorman 
William Hennessey 
Daniel Kelly 
Kathleen Magee 
John Phelan 



John Burke 
Daniel Cahill 
Martha Cray 



Richard Feinberg 



-9- 



DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



NAME 

Alexander, Lawrence (A) 
Babcock, Elizabeth 
Baker, Edythe C. 
Baker, Robert Allan 
Blonder, Jeffery 

Borten, Katherine (A) 

Callahan, J. Christopher 

Cassidy, Francis A. 

Cunningham, Marguerite 

Dembowski, Henry S. 

DiGiulio, Margaret, Clerk 

DiMento, William R. 

Dipesa, Ralph (A) 

Doyle, James T. 

Driscoll, Thomas H. Jr. 

Emspak. Frank 

Greenbaum, Lawrence 

Hartley, John M. 

Katz, Erica 

Kearney, Sheila 

Kenney, Judith 

Kyriakakis, Carole 

LaPeer, Susan 

McCormack, Barbara 

Murphy, Kent, Vice-Chairman 

Murphy, Brian 

Nelson, Teresa 

Patrikis, Theodore A. 

Reichlin, Abbott 

Rosenthal.. Burt (A) 
Segal, Maddy 
Shanahan, William E. 
Sherr, Mary Lou 
Small, Elliot 

Small, Margaret Somer, Chairman 

Smith, James 

Smullin, Alix, Treasurer 

Valleriani, Catherine (A) 

Vatcher, Howard (A) 

Vatcher, Teresa J. 

Watson, Brian 

Weiss, Gerdy 

Wood, Richard L. 

Zion, Beth (A) 
A = Associate Members 



ADDRESS 

State House, Room 504, Boston 
33 Manton Road 
75 Stanley Road 
75 Stanley Road 
15 Shackle Way 

9 Clarke Road 
44 Glen Road 

201 Humphrey Street 

68 Foster Road 

42 Beach Bluff Avenue 
67 Walker Road 

64 Bay View Drive 
67 Aspen Road 

10 Arbutus Road 
82 Farragut Road 
33 Outlook Road 

21 Beach Avenue 
154 Burrill Street 
33 Gale Road 

14 Shackle Way 
9 Banks Circle 
90 Mountwood Road 
24 Lincoln Circle 
2 Hillcrest Circle 
40 Glen Road 
92 Melvin Avenue 
36 Paradise Road 
1 Hillcrest Circle 
8 Sumner Road 

69 Ocean View Road 

8 Sumner Road 
48 King Street 

9 Blaney Street 

32 Bay View Avenue 
32 Bay View Avenue 
38 Outlook Road 

22 Woodbine Avenue 
515 Humphrey Street 
66 Pleasant Street 

65 Pleasant Street 

50 Greenwood Avenue 
101 Bay View Avenue 
31 Cedar Hill Terrace 
451 Essex Street 



-10- 



ELECTED REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 





1989 


Bullwinkle, Gary 


9 Claremont Terrace 


Butters, Joy 


53 Pleasant Street 


Clain, Mary 


62 Thomas Road 


Cross, David 


24 Ingalls Terrace 


Hax/prn Timothv .1 


38 Manton Road 


Dudley, Ruby 


30 Blaney Street 


Fried, Fred 


27 Eureka Avenue 


Greenwald, Ronald 


8 Capstan Way 


Jacobs, Leonard 


400 Paradise Road 


Mancini, Francis 


159 Aspen Road 


McGrath, Kevin 


849 Humphrey Street 


McGrath, Marianne 


258 Essex Street 


McVie, Robert L. 


26 Beverly Road 


Nigrelli, Eugene 


21 MacArthur Circle 


O'Brien, Vincent P. 


139 Kansington Lane 


Palleschi, Arthur J. 


3 Bradlee Avenue 


Palleschi, Brenda 


3 Bradlee Avenue 


Palleschi, Edward 


3 Bradlee Avenue 


Parker, Alvah 


3 Deer Cove Road 


Perry, Frank H. 


319 Paradise Road 


Perry, Frank H. Jr. 


71 Roy Street 


Perry, Marilyn A. 


6 MacArthur Circle 


Perry, Robert E., Chairman 


6 MacArthur Circle 


Stanton, Harriet 


86 Paradise Road 


Warnock, Donald 


32 Berkshire Street 


Whittemore, Ann 


36 Puritan Road 


York, Francis 


24 Laurel Road 



-11 - 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Robert E. Perry, Chairman 



Peter R. Beatrice, III 
James L. Rudolph 



Daniel R. Santanello 
Thomas H. Driscoll (Deceased) 



Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 

In 1989, three new members were elected to the Board of Selectmen. Because 
of the untimely death of Thomas H. Driscoll in August, a special election was called 
by request to fill the vacancy. Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. was elected to assume the 
role of Selectman in his father's place. 

The new Board, together with veteran member, Chairman, Robert E. Perry, 
have faced the challenges of administering and coordinating the Town's 
government and business. 

First among the several challenges of 1989, was the completion of the Tie-In 
of the Secondary Treatment plant with the City of Lynn. 

After three years of negotiations with the police regarding their contract, a 
settlement was reached in late summer. 

In June due to health problems, Chief Peter J. Cassidy announced his 
retirement after more than thirty years of service in the Police Department. To 
Chief Cassidy we express our sincere gratitude for the service he gave to the Town. 
Our appointment of Captain John E. Toomey as Acting Chief, makes us realize 
how fortunate the Town of Swampscott is in the capable persons who have served 
so well, and who continue the tradition of making themselves available for service 
to the Town. 

With funds which had been appropriated by Town Meeting, the Department 
of Public Works was able to complete work on sidewalks and the seawall along 
Humphrey Street. 

Because of the fiscal problems of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Local 
Aid to towns and cities was decreased substantially. For Swampscott this cut 
resulted in a loss of over $430,000. Faced with difficult budgetary decisions, Town 
departments concentrated on revising their respective budgets. In response to 
the shortfall, parking fines were increased by the Police Department; a number 
of departments increased their fees; and vacancies resulting from retirements were 
not filled. It is our belief that we must explore new ways to increase revenue in 
order to meet the needs of the Town and particularly to ensure public safety. 
Considering the serious financial position of the Town, we believe that one solution 
open to us is to support an Override of Proposition 2 1/2. 

Increased interest in a change in Town government prompted another attempt 
at a Charter Commission, and a Subcommittee was formed to Study the 
Reorganization of Town Government. We believe that the interest expressed by 
the citizens of Swampscott brings us to the realization that exploring alternatives 
in Town government is not an option but an obligation and privilege that flows 
from our commitment as your elected officials. 

To all who served on Boards and Committees, to elected officials and to 
citizens who assisted us during the past year, we express our sincere gratitude 
for your cooperation. We appreciate especially the efforts of Town Counsel, Arthur 
Palleschi, who successfully brought to completion several cases which had been 
outstanding for a number of years. 

Prompted by a continuing sense of responsibility, we proceed with our work 
and studies of what seems best for the Town of Swampscott. We thank you for 
the support you have given us during the year, and we look forward to your 
continued support and assistance. 



-12- 



A TRIBUTE TO SELECTMAN THOMAS H. DRISCOLL 
April 22, 1986 - August 13, 1989 

Selectman Thomas H. Driscoll served his Town and Country well during his 
74 years of life. 

He was a decorated combat veteran of World War II, past Commander of the 
William Connery Post 6; a member of the American Legion, Leon Abbott Post; 
the U. S. Marines Edison's Raiders Association; the American Bar Association; 
and the Swampscott Rotary Club. 

Before being elected Selectman, he served as Swampscott's Bargaining 
Agent, Assistant Corporate Counsel for the City of Boston, Counsel to the City 
of Lynn Housing Authority, Legislative Counsel to the Mass. Federation of 
Taxpayers and Member of the Mass. Federation of Nursing Homes. 

Tom served on the Governor's Council on Alcoholism under Governor Edward 
J. King and was former Counsel for the North Shore Council on Alcoholism. He 
gave untiringly to his work with Alcoholics Anonymous, the Beech Hill Hospital 
and Mount Pleasant Hospital. 

One of Tom's proudest duties was to be present at the Board of Selectmen's 
meetings to represent the people of Swampscott. He will be remembered for his 
many achievements and sadly missed by his colleagues. 

Photo courtesy of Swampscott Reporter 



-13- 



CLERK OF SWAMPSCOTT 
JACK L. PASTER 

The most important records in the Town of Swampscott are at risk and our 
pleas for corrective action have fallen on deaf ears. 

We've taken every possible step to safeguard the town's birth, death and 
marriage records from 1852 through this morning to minimize the risks associated 
with fire and theft. However, our vital records remain in a constant state of jeopardy. 

The reason? 

Our large, walk-in vault does not provide adequate protection and failed, 
miserably, during the most recent state inspection. A nine-page deficiencies report 
stated: "...None of the vaults in the Town Hall comply with all of the requirements 
as spelled out in the 'Specifications for Safes and Vaults' as adopted by the 
Secretary of State Archives Division. 

The General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (Chapter 66, 
Section 1 1 and 12) require that a municipality provide fire-resistant safes and vaults 
for the safeguarding of their public records. 

The vault protecting YOUR public records is not theft proof. Even though the 
office itself is protected by a modern and efficient burglar alarm system with a 
direct connection to the Police Department, the door to the vault will not close 
and even if it did, the combination lock hasn't been operational for the past 30+ 
years. 

The vault protecting YOUR public records is not fire proof. The inner and outer 
doors could not contain a fire because they are not fire rated according to 
acceptable standards and even though a single heat detector has been installed 
with a direct connection to the Fire Department, the vault has no smoke detection 
or sprinkler protection. The Commonwealth's report stated, "In the case of your 
Town Hall building, which is a wooden frame building, this (fire) hazard is especially 
pronounced because wooden frames can simply not be relied upon to stand up 
in the event of a major fire." 

What should be done? 

An appropriation of approximately $10,000 must be authorized to purchase 
fire resistive, water proof and drop tested files and cabinets which would fit into 
the current walk-in vault. The most important of the town's records would then 
be placed into these containers which comply with the state's records protection 
specifications. Also included with the appropriation would be money to repair the 
vault door to allow it to be closed and locked at the close of every business day. 

While the financial plight of our community is on everyone's lips, this $10,000 
expenditure cannot be considered a frill or a luxury. I have filed an article for the 
1990 Town Meeting warrant and would urge all residents to contact their Town 
Meeting members seeking support for this most important project. 

The Finance Committee's comment that 'the cost involved is not warranted 
at this time' must not be accepted. In actuality, we cannot afford NOT to fund 
this project. Even the smallest fire or act of vandalism could ruin your chances 
of obtaining a copy of a birth, death or marriage certificate in Swampscott. Think 
about that before Town Meeting. 

RESIGNATIONS 

State Law (Chapter 41 , Section 109) mandates that a resignation of any elected 
or appointed officer of a town is not effective unless and until a letter of resignation 
is sent or delivered to the Town Clerk. Correspondence to any other office, board 
or official is not acceptable under the law. Only the Town Clerk is empowered 
by statute to accept, process and act on resignations. 

When your Town Clerk receives a resignation from a town officer, he records 
the document and notifies the appointing authority (or the Election Commission 



-14- 



in the case of an elected official) citing how the vacancy can be filled and for how 
long. This effort insures that all boards, committees, commissions and positions 
are kept at full strength at all times to best serve the public. 

Resignations received and processed during 1989 included: Herbert C. Hagele 
Jr., MD, Ambulance Oversight Committee; Patricia Law Dutch, Railroad Parking 
Committee; Barbara H. Fulghum, Historical Commission; Peter R. Beatrice III, 
Board of Appeals (associate member); James L. Rudolph, Board of Appeals; Kevin 
G. Gookin, Finance Committee; John V. Phelan III, Board of Appeals (associate 
member); Douglas F. Allen, War Memorial Scholarship Fund; Henry J. Collins, 
Republican Town Committee; Gerald B. Freedman, Personnel Board; Robert A. 
Baker, Phillips Beach Fire Station Committee; Edward Publicover, assistant 
Harbormaster; Ann M. Whittemore, Republican Town Committee; and Jack L. 
Paster, Capital Improvements Study Committee. 

OFFICIAL TOWN STATISTICS - 1989 



Marriage Intentions Filed/Marriage Licenses Issued 127 

Marriages Recorded 125 

Births Recorded (69, Female; 58, Male) 127 

Deaths Recorded (73, Female; 66, Male) 1 39 

Applications for Variances and Special Permits 61 

Environmental Impact Statements Accepted 4 

Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act: 

Con. Comm. Notices of Intent Processed 1 

Requests for Determination of Applicability Received 5 

Applications for Planning Board Action Processed 8 

Site Plan Review Applications Processed 14 

Public Meeting Notices Recorded and Posted 450 

Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) Filings Processed 118 

Certificates of Business (DBA) Issued and Processed 82 

Gas Storage (Flammables) Renewal Permits Issued 12 

Certificates of Municipal Lien Prepared and Issued 501 

Dog Licenses Issued 900 

Dog Fines Collected $3,485.00 

Hunting/Fishing/Sporting/Trapping Licenses Issued 183 

Waterfowl Stamps Issued 33 

Archery/Primitive Firearms Deer Season Stamps Issued 18 



NOTE: Since Swampscott births occur in out-of-town hospitals, the reports of said 
births, as contained in the above statistical report, must first be processed by the 
City Clerk in the communities where the birth actually took place before it is filed 
here in the parents' home community. There is often a lag of one, two or even 
three months before the official report arrives at Town Hall. In preparing our year- 
end report we use a cut-off date of January 20. Births occurring after that date 
are not included in the above statistics. In an attempt to minimize any possible 
confusion and to allow this report to serve as a historically correct document, we 
will publish updated totals in each year's report for the preceding year for births 
and deaths. 

1988 Final Statistics: Births - 151; Deaths - 170 



-75- 



TOWN CLERK'S OFFICIAL REPORT 
OF THE 1989 TOWN MEETINGS 
WARRANT 
Special Town Meeting of March 27, 1989 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
March 27, 1989 beginning at 7:45 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior 
High School on Greenwood Avenue. 

Douglas F. Allen, moderator, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

RETURN OF SERVICE 

Persuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants of 
the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in election and in Town affairs by postihg 
an attested copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, 
and in at least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, 
and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting 
was done on Monday, March 13, 1989, and not less than fourteen (14) days before 
the date appointed for said meeting. 

Arline Maguire, Constable 

of Swampscott 

Selectmen opened and closed the Warrant on March 7, 1989. The Warrant 
was mailed by the Town Clerk to all Town Meeting members on March 9, 1989. 

See attendance report for this meeting later in this section of the Town Report 
which will cover the calendar year of 1989. 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator Douglas F. Allen at 7:45p.m. 
with the necessary quorum present ( 245, members). 

Town Clerk Jack L. Paster read the Return of Service. 

Rep. Lawrence Alexander was recognized as being in attendance as were 
two Swampscott High School students who were assigned to role play the positions 
of Town Clerk and Collector during the mock Student Town Meeting on April 10 
and 11, Liza Eschelbacher and Mark Rubin. The students were seated on the stage 
with the Town Clerk and Moderator and provided assistance during the meeting. 

ACTION ON ARTICLES 

ARTICLE 1 . To see what advice and direction the Town Meeting will give to the 
Board of Public Works relative to the question of whether the town should construct 
its own secondary wastewater treatment plan and related facilities, or whether 
the town should enter an agreement with the Lynn Water and Sewer Commission 
to dispose of sewage at its wastewater treatment plant. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen. 

Voted Article 1 : That the Swampscott (in-town) alternative for wastewater 
treatment be adopted and that the regional (Lynn option) alternative be abandoned. 

Date: March 27, 1989 

Counted Vote: 69, Yes; 157, No. 
ARTICLE 2. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money for the 
construction of sewers, sewage systems and sewage treatment and disposal 
facilities, or for the lump-sum payment of the cost to tie into such services in a 
contiguous city or town by borrowing or otherwise or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen. 



-16- 



Voted Article 2: That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: March 27, 1989 
Unanimous Vote. 

The Special Town Meeting voted unanimously to dissolve at 9:48 p.m. 

TOWN WARRANT 

Special Town Meeting of May 1, 1989 

Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Swampscott in said county: 
GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in town 
affairs to assemble in the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium on Greenwood 
Avenue on Monday, the first day of May, 1989, at 8:00 p.m. in the forenoon, then 
and there to act on the following articles, viz: (Articles printed with votes which follow) 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
at the Town Administfation Building, at the Post Office, and in at least two public 
and conspicuous places in each precinct in the town, and at or in the immediate 
vicinity of each railroad station in town not less than fourteen (14) days before the 
date appointed for said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. 

Given under dur hands this 6th day of April, 1989. 

Board of Selectmen 

NOTICE OF MEETING 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott that a Special Town Meeting will be held on Monday, 
May 1, 1989 beginning at 8:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior 
High School on Greenwood Avenue. 

The newly elected Moderator of Swampscott will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

RETURN OF SERVICE 

Persuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants 
of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in election and in Town affairs by posting 
an attested copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post Office, 
and in at least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the Town, 
and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said posting 
was done on Tuesday, April 18, 1989, and not less than seven (7) days before the 
date appointed for said meeting. 

Arline Maguire 
Constable of Swampscott 

Selectmen opened and closed the Warrant on April 4, 1989. The Warrant and 
notice was mailed to all Town Meeting members on April 13, 1989. 

See attendance report for this meeting later in this section of the Town Report 
which will cover the calendar year of 1989. 

The meeting was called to order at 8:00 p.m. by Moderator Martin C. Goldman 
with the necessary quorum present (303 members). 

Town Clerk Jack L. Paster read the Return of Service. 

On the motion by Kevin Gookin, chairman of the Finance Committee, action 



- 17- 



on the articles was deferred until after Article 67 in the Annual Town Meeting 
Warrant. 

The Special Town Meeting was adjourned at 8:01 p.m. by a unanimous vote. 

The adjourned session of the Special Town Meeting was reconvened at 8:58 
p.m. on May 2, 1989 with the necessary quorum present (193 members). At 10:35 
p.m. on May 2, 1989 the adjourned session of the Special Town Meeting was 
adjourned to 7:45 p.m. on May 3, 1989. The adjourned session of the Special Town 
Meeting was reconvened at 7:54 p.m. on May 3, 1989 with the necessary quorum 
present (283 members). At 10:31 p.m. on May 3, 1989 it was voted to adjourn the 
Special Town Meeting until 7:45 p.m. on May 11, 1989. The adjourned session of 
the Special Town Meeting was reconvened at 7:50 p.m. on May 11, 1989 with the 
necessary quorum present (241 members). At 9:50 p.m. on May 11, 1989, the 
Special Town Meeting was dissolved by a unanimous vote. 

Sandra Rotner of the School Committee offered a tribute to retiring School 
Committeeman Donald Page for his years of dedicated service. Town Meeting 
members responded with a resounding ovation. 

Notice of Adjourned Session 

The following notice concerning the adjourned session of the Special Town 
Meeting was mailed to all Town Meeting members on May 5, 1989: 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned session of the Special Town Meeting 
(called to order on May 1, 1989 at 8:00 p.m.) will be held on Thursday, May 11, 
1989, 7:45 p.m., in the auditorium of the Swampscott Junior High School on 
Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, Esq., moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 



-18- 



ACTION ON THE ARTICLES 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of money for the 
construction of sewers, sewage systems and sewage treatment and disposal 
facilities, or for the lump-sum payment of the cost to tie into such services in a 
contiguous city or town by borrowing or otherwise or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen. 

VOTED ARTICLE 1 . That $21 ,000,000 is appropriated for the construction 
of sewers, sewage systems and sewage treatment and disposal facilities, and 
including, if desirable, for the lump-sum payment of the cost of a tie-in to such 
services in the City of Lynn in order to comply with a recent consent decree and 
that to meet this appropriation $220,000 shall be transferred from the appropriation 
voted under Article 63 of the warrant for the 1988 Annual Town Meeting and the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow $20,780,000 
under G.L. c.44; and that the Board of Public Works is authorized to contract for 
and expend any federal or state aid available for the project and further that the 
Board of Public Works is directed to report annually to the Town Meeting with 
an itemized list of expenditures incurred in the past year on the sewer project and 
an estimated projection of the future costs each year. 

Date: May 11, 1989 

Unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to Petition the General Court to enact legislation permitting the School Committee 
to settle an unpaid bill or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee. 

VOTED ARTICLE 2. That the town authorize the Selectmen to petition the 
General Court to permit the School Committee to settle an unpaid bill as requested 
in this article. 

(Editorial note: This matter coucerns Article 80 of the 1988 Annual Town 
Meeting Warrant which appropriated $20,000 for the purchase of departmental 
equipment for the Sthool Department, through bonding, the final action of which 
took place on May 16, 1988.) 

Date: May 3, 1989 

Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will reconsider the action taken under Article 63 
of the 1988 Annual Town Meeting warrant or take any action relative thereto. 
Spohsored by the Board of Selectmen. 

VOTED ARTICLE 3. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 3, 1989 
Unanimous vote. 

TOWN CLERK S REPORT 
OF THE SWAMPSCOTT ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

TOWN WARRANT 

ARTICLE 1. 

Essex, ss. 

To either of the Constable of the Town of Swampscott in said County: 
GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are directed to notify 
the inhabitants of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs to assemble in their respective prcincts in said Swampscott, to wit — 
Precinct One Polling Place Machon School on Burpee Road 
Precinct Two Polling Place Clarke School on Norfolk Avenue 
Precinct Three Polling Place Central Fire Station on Burrill Street 



-19- 



Precinct Four Polling Place Hadley School on Redington Street 
Precinct Five Polling Place High School on Forest Avenue 
Precinct Six Polling Place High School on Forest Avenue 

on Tuesday, the twenty-fifth of April, 1989, at 7:00 in the forenoon, ten and there 

to act on the following articles, viz: 

To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose five (5) members of the Board of Selectmen for one (1) year 
To choose one (1) Town Treasurer for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Trustees of Public Library for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Board of Health for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Planning Board for five (5) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Board of Public Works for three (3) years 
To choose two (2) members of the School Committee for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of Commissioner of Trust Funds for three (3) years 
To choose three (3) Constables for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct One for two (2) years 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting Member in Precinct One for one (1) year 
To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts 
for three (3) years 

Question No. 1 (A nonbinding Public Opinion Advisory question) 

Shall the Twon vote to undertake a Charter procedure to review the structure 

of Swampscott Town Government? 

At the close of the election the meeting will adjourn to Monday, the first of 

May, 1989 at 7:45 P.M., at the Junior High School Auditorium. 

See the report of the Election Commissioners for the results of the 1989 

Municipal Election held on April 25, 1989. 

RETURN OF SERVICE 

Pursuant to the within warrant to me directed, I have notified the inhabitants 
of the Town of Swampscott qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs by 
posting an attested copy thereof at the Town Administration Building, at the Post 
Office, and in at least two public and conspicuous places in each precinct in the 
Town and at or in the immediate vicinity of the Swampscott Railroad Station. Said 
posting was done April 13, 1989, and not less than seven (7) days before the date 
appointed for said meeting. 

Arline Maguire 
Constable of Swampscott 

Mailing of Warrants and Annual Report: 

The Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting were mailed to Town Meeting 
members and to those residents who were running for a Town Meeting seat (listed 
on the ballot) on April 13, 1989. Copies of the Annual Report were also mailed 
on April 13, 1989 in the same package. Copies of the Annual Report and the 
Warrant were also available free of charge for any interested person in the Town 
Clerk and Selectmen's Offices at the Town Administration Building. 

NOTICES OF MEETING: 

The following notices were mailed to each Town Meeting member on April 
13, 1989. 



-20- 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

The Annual Town Meeting of 1989 will convene on Tuesday, April 25, 1989 
with Article 1 (the Town Election) at 7:00 a.m. in the Town's regular polling places. 
At 8:00 p.m. the Town Meeting will be adjourned until May 1, 1989, 7:45 p.m., 
at the Swampscott Junior High School, 

NOTICE OF ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MONDAY, MAY 1, 1989, 7:45 P.M. 

To the Town Meeting members: 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2 of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott, that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting will be held 
on Monday, May 1, 1989, beginning at 7:45 p.m., in the auditorium of te 
Swampscott Junior High School on Greenwood Avenue. 

The newly elected moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

The required identification badges are to be picked up at the auditorium after 
you have checked in. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of the Annual Town 
Meeting of April 25, 1989, the Adjourned Town Meeting of May 1 , 1989 was held 
at the Swampscott Junior High School auditorium and was called to order at 7:40 
p.m. with the necessary quorum being present (244). At 10:25 p.m., it was voted 
to adjourn to May 2, 1989. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 1 , 1989, the 
Adjourned Town Meeting of May 2, 1989 was held at the Swampscott Junior High 
School auditorium and was called to order at 7:47 p.m. with the necessary quorum 
being present (192). It was voted at 10:35 p.m. to adjourn to May 3, 1989. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 2, 1989, the 
Adjourned Town Meeting of May 3, 1989 was held at the Swampscott Junior High 
School auditorium and was called to order at 7:54 p.m. with the necessary quorum 
being present (283). At 10:31 p.m., it was voted to adjourn to May 11, 1989. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 3, 1989, the 
Adjourned Town Meeting of May 1 1 , 1989 was held at the Swampscott Junior High 
School auditorium and was called to order at 9:50 p.m. with the necessary quorum 
being present (265 ). It was voted at 10:35 p.m. to adjourn to June 12, 1989. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of May 1 1, 1989. The 
Adjourned Town Meeting of June 12, 1989 was held at the Swampscott Junior 
High School auditorium and was called to order at 7:47 p.m. with the necessary 
quorum being present (265 ). At 11:28 p.m., it was voted to adjourn to June 13, 
1989 on a counted vote. 

I hereby certify that in accordance with the adjournment of June 12, 1989, 
the Adjourned Town Meeting of June 13, 1989 was held at the Swampscott Junior 
High School auditorium and was called to order at 7:55 p.m. with the necessary 
quorum being present (171). It was voted at 10:58 p.m. to dissolve the 1989 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

The following notice was published as a legal advertisement in The 
Swampscott Reporter on April 27, 1989: 

TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

OFFICE OF THE TOWN CLERK 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2 of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of 1989 will 
be held on Monday, May 1, 1989 beginning at 7:45 p.m. in the auditorium of the 



-21 - 



Swampscott Junior High School on Greenwood Avenue. 
The moderator of Swampscott will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

The following notice was mailed to all Town Meeting members on May 5, 1989: 
TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Office of the Town Clerk 

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Article II, Section 2, of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Swampscott that the Adjourned session of the Annual Town Meeting 
of 1989 will be held on Monday, June 12, 1989, 7:45 p.m., in the auditorium of 
the Swampscott Junior High School on Greenwood Avenue. 

Martin C. Goldman, Esq., moderator of Swampscott, will preside. 

Jack L. Paster 
Clerk of Swampscott 

Attendance: 

For the 1989 Town Meeting attendance, by precinct, see the list at the end 
of this report. 

TOWN MEETING ACTION 

The Return of Service was read by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster who then 
administered the Oath of Office to the Town Meeting members. 

Monsignor John P. Carroll of St. John the Evangelist Church, Swampscott, 
offered the invocation. 

Moderator Martin C. Goldman offered a tribute to former Moderator, Selectman 
and Finance Committeeman Vincent P. O'Brien to mark his many years of service 
to the town. A recognition plaque was presented. 

On May 11, 1989, Finance Committee Secretary Robert L. McVie offered 
remarks to thank retiring Fin Com Chairman Kevin Gookin for his efforts on behalf 
of the town. 

Also on May 11, 1989, School Committee member Sandra Rotner offered 
remarks to thank retiring School Committeeman Donald Page for his years of 

service. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear and act on the reports of Town Officials, Boards, and 
Committees. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted under Article 2. 

1 . That the report presented by Richard Salter of the Capital Improvement Study 
Committee be accepted, that the committee remain in existence and that a 
report be made to the next annual Town Meeting. 

2. That the report presented by Donald Babcock of the Sawtelle Study Committee 
be accepted and tha the committee continue in existence. 

3. That the report presented by Richard Bane of the Committee to Purchase 
a Van for the Council on Aging be accepted. 

4. That the report presented by John F. Burke of the Ambulance Oversight 
Committee be accepted and that the committee continue in existence. 

5. That the report presented by John Phelan of the Field House Renovation 
Committee be accepted and that the committee continue in existence. 



-22- 



6. That the report presented by Lawrence Greenbaum of the Computer Study 
Committee be accepted and that the following recommendations be adopted: 

a. That the Board of Selectmen review the job description of the Data 
Processing Coordinator; 

b. That any department in need of additional hardware or special software 
include those needs in their annual budget for consideration by a future Town 
Meeting; 

c. That the Computer Study Committee be dissolved. 
Date: May 1, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 3. That the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of revenue for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1989 in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 4. To see what action the Town will take in relation to salaries of elected 
Town Officials for the ensuing year. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 4. That the Town vote to fix the salary and compensation of all 
elected officers of the Town as provided by Section 108 of Chapter 41, General 
Laws as amended, for the twelve month period beginning July 1, 1989: 



Selectmen: 

Chairman $ 2,200 

Another Member 1 ,400 

Another Member 1 ,400 

Another Member 1 ,400 

Another Member 1 ,400 

Town Clerk and Collector of Taxes 28,000 

Assessors: 

Chairman 1,600 

Member/Secretary 1,150 

Another Member 1,100 

Treasurer 7,000 

Board of Health: 

Chairman 220 

Another Member 165 

Another Member 165 

Board of Public Works: 

Chairman 1,600 

Another Member 1,100 

Another Member 1,100 

Constable (one of three) 100 

Moderator 100 



And that the sum of $21 ,225.00 be appropriated therefor (noting that $22,875 



-23- 



of the Town Clerk and Collector's salary and the $7,000 salary for the Treasurer 
is already included in Article 5, the Budget). Further, that the Moderator is directed 
to appoint a Salary Study Committee of five members to study the appropriatness 
of these salaries or reimbursements including travel, and also the salaries or lack 
of salaries pertaining to any other elected or appointed boards or committees. 
Said committee to be represented by one member of the Finance Committee, one 
member from an elected or appointed board and three members with no nexus 
to any aforementioned board or committee. Further that said committee report 
its findings and recommendations to the Finance Committee no later than February 
1, 1990 and to the next Annual Town Meeting. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 5. To see what action the Town will take concerning the budget for 
the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1989, and ending on June 30, 1990, and 
appropriate the necessary money, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 5: That the Town approve this article and that the following 
amounts of money be appropriated for the several purposes hereinafter itemized. 
Each numbered line item is to be considered a separate appropriation. The 
budgeted amounts may only be spent for the stated purpose. 

1989 SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING 
BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS/ARTICLES REPORT 

From: From: 





FOR FY 1990 - 


JUNE 15, 


4 AAA 

1989 






Voted 


From: 


LI/ART 


Identification 


Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


1 


Moderator (a) 







2 


Fin Com Secretary 


2,862 


2,862 


3 


Fin Com Expenses 


70 


70 


4 


Selectmen-Salaries (a) 


29,097 


29,097 


5 


Office Expenses 


2,000 


2,000 


8 


Union Related Expenses 


1,200 


1,200 


9 


Contigent 


1,500 


1,500 


10 


Law Dept. -Town Counsel 


20,858 


20,858 


11 


Special Counsel 


10,000 


10,000 


12 


Office Expenses 


3,500 


3,500 


13 


Parking Ticket Clerk 


1 


1 


13A 


Supplies 


1,000 


1,000 


14 


Bargaining Agent 


10,000 


10,000 


15 


Workmen's Comp. Off. Exp. 


3,500 


3,500 


16 


Assistant-Fire/Police Medical 


95,000 


95,000 


17 


Personnel Bd. Salaries 


192 


192 


18 


Town Accountant-Salaries 


64,589 


64,589 


19 


Office Expenses 


5,300 


5,300 


20 


Travel In State 


450 


450 


21 


Data Processing Coordinator 


4,079 


4,079 


22 


Treasurer-Salaries 


29,118 


29,118 


23 


Office Expenses (b) 


4,315 


4,315 


24 


Travel In State/Seminars 


300 


300 


25 


Furn. & Office Equipment 


600 


600 


26 


Town Clerk-Collector Salaries (a, c) 


65,104 


65,104 


27 


Office Expenses (d) 


21,200 


21,200 


28 


Travel In State/Seminars 


600 


600 


29 


Furn. & Office Equipment 


250 


250 



-24- 



Voted 



LI/ART 


Identification 


Appropriation 


30 


Town Postage Account (e) 


18,000 


31 


Town Meeting 


1,500 


32 


Election Commission-Salaries 


30,892 


33 


Office Expenses 


800 


34 


Election Expenses 


7,557 


36 


Assessors-Salaries (a) 


40,245 


37 


Appellate Tax Board 


4,000 


38 


Office Expenses 


4,000 


39 


Travel In State 


400 


40 


Data Processing 


300 


42 


Computer Maintenance 


1,500 


43 


File Maintenance 


12,000 


44 


Personal Property Maintenance 


5,766 


45 


Seminars 


600 


46 


Administration Bldg. -Salaries 


33,684 


47 


Building Expenses 


13,654 


48 


Shop Expense (VFW Building) 


800 


49 


Board of Appeals-Secretary 


2,000 


50 


Office Expenses 


1,351 


51 


Planning Board-Secretary 


1,200 


52 


Expenses 


428 


54 


Contributory Retirement 






Exp. Fund 


4,000 


55 


Pension Accumulation Fund 


1,321,656 


56 


Non-Contributory Pensions (Net) 


292,000 


57 


Police-Salaries 


1,223,961 


57A 


(Sch. Traffic Super. 






$37,936 not subject to 






diminution) 




58 


Expenses 


92,787 


68 


Fire-Salaries 


1,455,903 


69 


Expenses 


62,419 


78 


Harbormaster-Salary (f) 


2,544 


79 


Office Expenses (f) 


456 


80 


Gas/Oil/Equip. Maint. etc (f) 


829 


81 


Civil Defense-Director 


1,050 


82 


Operating Expense 


918 


83 


Weights/Measures-Inspector Sal. 


4,087 


84 


Office Expense 


50 


85 


Travel In State 


168 


86 


Constable-Salary 


96 


87 


Building Inspector-Salaries 


41,812 


88 


Office Expenses 


800 


90 


Travel In State 


172 


92 


Wire Inspector-Salaries 


9,394 


93 


Office Expenses 


150 


94 


Travel In State 


360 


95 


Animal Control-Officer's Sal. 


5,855 


96 


Office Expenses 


385 


97 


Travel In State 


950 


98 


Boarding Animals/Pound/Supplies 


1,700 



From: From: From: 
Tax Rate Avail. Funds Bonding 

18,000 
1,500 
30,892 
800 
7,557 
40,245 
4,000 
4,000 
400 
300 
1,500 
12,000 
5,766 
600 
33,684 
13,654 
800 
2,000 
1,351 
1,200 
428 

4,000 
1,321,656 
292,000 
1,223,961 



92,787 
1,455,903 
62,419 



1,050 
918 

4,087 
50 
168 
96 
41,812 
800 
172 

9,394 
150 
360 

5,855 
385 
950 

1,700 



2,544 
456 
829 



-25- 



Voted 



LI/ART 


Identification 


Appropriation 


99 


Conservation Commission 






Off. Exp. 


230 


100 


General Expenses 


632 


101 


Insurance 


1,253,516 


102 


Health Department Salaries (a) 


77,340 


103 


Office Expenses 


2,400 


104 


Travel In State 


2,240 


107 


Inspection and Tests 


4,205 


108 


Rubbish Collections 


359,528 


109 


Public Wks.- Non-water 






Wages (a,g) 


540,729 


110 


Water Wages 


248,905 


111 


Non-Water Operating 






Exp/Supplies 


105,100 


112 


Non-Water Equipment Maint. 


30,000 


113 


Non-Water Snow & Ice 


26,500 


114 


Non-Water Consultant 






Engineer Services 


5,000 


115 


Non-Water Street Sweeping 


20,000 


116 


Non-Water Maintenance 






Construction (h) 


55,000 


117 


Non-Water Travel In State 


1,750 


118 


Non-Water Clothing Allowance 


5,700 


120 


Water Operating Exp/Supplies 


30,000 


121 


Water Equipment Maint. 


2,000 


122 


Water Travel In State 


480 


123 


Water MDC Water 


500,000 


124 


Water Communications 


1,150 


125 


Water Professional Serv. 






Water Bills 


500 


126 


Water Water Meters 


16,000 


126A 


Water Clothing Allowance 


2,100 


127 


Moth Control 


8,000 


128 


Dutch Elm 


5,000 


129 


Shade Trees 


3,500 


130 


Treatment Pit/Lift Sta. Exp. (i) 


275,000 


131 


Recreation-Coord i nator 


4,500 


132 


Secretary 


3,192 


133 


Other Salaries 


30,130 


134 


Office Expenses 


1,770 


135 


Travel In State 


250 


136 


Furn. & Office Equip./Service 


85 


137 


Program Expense 


8,058 


138 


Council on Aging- 






Coord inator/Clk 


7,800 


139 


Other Expenses 


15,532 


140 


Veterans Services-Salaries 


7,000 


141 


Office Expenses 


64 


142 


Travel In State 


300 


143 


Assistance 


10,000 


143A 


Memorial Day 


479 


143B 


Veterans Day 


382 



From: From: From: 
Tax Rate Avail. Funds Bonding 

230 
632 
1,253,516 
77,340 
2,400 
2,240 
4,205 
359,528 

490,729 50,000 
248,905 

105,100 
30,000 
26,500 

5,000 
20,000 

55,000 
1,750 
5,700 
30,000 
2,000 
480 
500,000 
1,150 

500 
16,000 
2,100 
8,000 
5,000 
3,500 
275,000 
4,500 
3,192 
30,130 
1,770 
250 
85 
8,058 

7,800 
15,532 
7,000 
64 
300 
10,000 
479 
382 



-26- 







Voted 


From: 


From: 


LI/ART 


Identification 


Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


144 


Interest-General Debt 


248,754 


248,754 




145 


Temporary Loans 


67,500 


67,500 




146 


Principal-General Debt 


1,034,382 


1,034,382 




147 


Cetification on Notes/Bonds 


5,000 


5,000 




148 


Library-Salaries (j) 


176,322 


176,322 




149 


Office Expenses 


2,844 


2,844 




150 


Building/Automation Expenses 


23,885 


23,885 




151 


Library Materials 


40,821 


40,821 




152 


Town Reports 


5,744 


5,744 




153 


Street Lighting 


155,000 


155,000 




154 


Fin Com Reserve Fund (k) 


270,000 


200,000 


70,000 


155 


Audit 


16,500 


16,500 




156 


Historical Commission 


383 


383 




157 


Medicare Tax 


25,000 


25,000 




158 


HAWC 


479 


479 




159 


Schools-Regional Voc-Tech Sch. 


82,960 


82,960 




lOU 


iMei ocnooi Duogei 


7 COO KQ1 


7 COO KQ1 






BUDGET TOTAL 


18,602,066 


18,478,237 


123,829 



From: 



LI/ART 

A- 4 

A- 7 

A- 8 

A- 9 

A-17 

A-31 

A-37 

A-48 

A-51 

A-52 

A-56 

A-58 



1989 SWAMPSCOTT TOWN MEETING 
BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS/ARTICLES REPORT 
FOR FY 1990-JUNE 15, 1989 



Identification 

Salaries of Elected Officers 
Unpaid Bills (m) 
Transfer to Reduce Tax Levy (n) 
Budget Transfers (o) 
Asbestos Removal 
Police Vehicles 
Sewer Jetter Vaccum Unit (o) 
Essex Street Bridge Study 
School Boilers/Atomizers/Burners 
School Energy Windows 
School Passenger Van 
School Little Theater Lighting 

ARTICLES TOTAL 

TOTAL BUDGET 
AND ARTICLES 



Voted 


From: 


From: 


Appropriation 


Tax Rate 


Avail. Funds 


21,225 


21,225 




21,081 


1,505 


19,576 


428,995 




428,995 


158,000 




158,000 


160,000 






28,024 


28,024 




32,000 






7,500 


7,500 




139,000 






33,000 






20,000 


20,000 




35,000 






1,083,825 


78,254 


606,571 



From: 
Bonding 



160,000 

32,000 

139,000 
33,000 



35,000 



19,685,891 18,556,491 730,400 399,000 



FOOTNOTES TO BUDGET/ARTICLES REPORT-1989 

a-Elected officials salaries are included in Article 4 
b-lncludes banking services 

c-Clerk-Col lector salary adjustments included in Article 4 

d-lncludes banking services and By-Law printing 

e-To service all departments 

f-Funded from Mooring Fees and Boat Excise Taxes 

g-$50,000 appropriated from Cemetery receipts 

h-lnculdes money for Chapter 497 work and repairs to private roads 

i-$60,000 to be funded through a sewer use fee 



-27- 



j-$10,203 will be added from State Aid and dog receipts 

k-$70,000 transferred from the Overlay Reserve Account 

l-$1 9,576 from Free Cash 

m-From Surplus Revenues 

n-Transfers among FY 1989 accounts as follows: 

$ 3.300 from LI 138-Recreation Salaries 

to LI 142-Recreation Programs 
$95,500 from Free Cash 

to LI 134-DPW Treatment Plant Expenses 
$16,200 from Free Cash 

to LI 118-DPW Engineering Services 
$22,500 from Free Cash 

to Article 17-Treatment Plant Legal Fees 
$ 4,632.95 from LI 66-Police Training 

to LI 58-Police Salaries 
$15,867.05 from LI 149-Temporary Loan Interest 

to LI 58-Police Salaries 

o-Debt service on this borrowing is to be funded from a sewer fee. 

ARTICLE 6. To see what action the Town will take on the matter of transferring 
the unexpended balances as shown on the books of the Town Accountant as of 
June 30, 1988 to the Surplus Revenue Account, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 6. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the 
account of unpaid bills for the purpose of settling all bills contracted prior to July 
1, 1988 and remaining unpaid at the time of the closing of the Town's books for 
the year ending June 30, 1988 according to the records of the Town Accountant, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 7. That the town appropriate the sum of $21,080.44 in order to 
pay the following bills which were unpaid at the close of the 1988 fiscal year on 
June 30, 1988: 

From Free Cash: 

DPW: Envirotech Operating Services - $19,575.61 
From the Tax Levy: 
Police: AT&T - $298.38 

UNISYS - $303.68 

Brand Co. - $17.94 

Salem Auto Spring - $398.25 
Assessors: Charrette - $86.58 
Animal Control: Hawthorne Animal Hospital - $400.00 
Date: may 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Surplus Revenue 
Account of the Town to the account of Current Revenue a sum of money to be 
used and applied by the Board of Assessors in the reduction of the tax levy, or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 



-28- 



Voted Article 8. That the town vote to transfer the sum of $428,995.39 from 
the Surplus Revenue Account to current revenue to be applied against the 
appropriations contained in Article 5 (the budget). 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of various funds 
from various town accounts which have monies remaining therein to such other 
town accounts which reflect a deficit, or take any action relative thereto or in 
connection therewith. 

Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 9. That the town vote to transfer monies among the FY 1989 
accounts as follows: 

$3,300 From LI 138 Recreation Salaries To LI 142 Recreation Programs. 
$95,500 From Free Cash To LI 134 DPW Treatment Plant Expense 
$16,200 From Free Cash To LI 118 DPW Engineering Services 
$22,500 From Free Cash To Article 17 Treatment Plant - Legal Fees 
$4,632.95 From LI 66 Police Training To LI 58 Police Salaries 
$15,867.05 From LI 149 Temporary Loan Interest To LI 58 Police Salaries 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Majority Vot 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to provide funds necessary to implement 
the collective bargaining agreements between the Board of Selectmen and the 
various unions under the Board of Selectmen. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 10. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to dispose 
of Town property or to see if the Town will take any other action thereto. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 11. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town's Personnel Board 
By-laws, other than the wage and salary classification, as recommended by the 
Personnel Board, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 12. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Board By-laws 
so as to reclassify certain existing positions, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Personnel Board 

Voted Article 13. That the town amend the Personnel Board By Laws as follows: 

a. Classification P7, Engineer, be changed to P7A with the title 
Engineering/Administrative Coordinator with a starting rate of $31,500 
with four annual increments of $1,250 each to a maximum salary of 
$36,500. 

b. Change the following recreation salaries as indicated: 

Parking Lot Attendants From $4.00, $4.25, $4.50 per hour 

To $4.75, $5.00, $5.25 per hour 
Lifeguard (Head) From $185.00, $195.00, $205.00 per week 

To $205.00, $215.00, $225.00 per week 



-29- 



Lifeguard (Regular) From $155.00, $165.00, $175.00 per wk 

To $185.00, $195.00, $205.00 per wk 
Sailing Director From $185.00, $195.00, $205.00 per week 

To $215.00, $225.00, $235.00 per week 
Sailing Instructor From $135.00, $145.00, $155.00 per week 

To $175.00, $185.00, $195.00 per week 
Recreation Coordinator From $3,600, $3,900, $4,200 per yr 

To $3,900, $4,300, $4,500 per yr 
Experience level is at the discretion of the Recreation Commission. 
NOTE: No additional funding is required for this article. The money required 
to fund these increases are included in the Recreation Budget in Article 5. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will authorize its Treasurer and Collector to enter 
into compensating balance agreement(s) for Fiscal Year 1990 pursuant to Chapter 
44 Section 53F of the General Laws. 

Sponsored by Treasurer and Collector Jack. L. Paster 
Voted Article 14. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote accept Chapter 697 Acts of 1987 to accept 
certain funding and benefit options. 
Sponsored by the Retirement Board 

Voted Article 15. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court to enact 
special legislation so as to increase the retirement allowance granted to certain 
retired Town employees. 

Sponsored by the Retirement Board 

Voted Article 16. That the Board of Selectmen be directed to file special 
legislation so that retirement allowances previously granted would be increased 
as follows: 

Kathryn B. Ingel - $5,000 per year 

Mildred B. Vray - $1,500 per year 
as of the date their original allowances were granted. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds by 
borrowing or otherwise, for the implementation of an asbestos program for the 
Town's Buildings including the School Buildings, for the Removal, Containment 
or Encapsulation of Asbestos or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Health, School Department, Library and 
Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 17. That the town appropriate the sum of $160,000 for the purposes 
described in the article and further that the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds 
or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 
7 Sub-section 3A and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing 
with any other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following changes to Town 
Clerk fees as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 262, Section 



-30- 



34, clauses 1-79 as follows: 

Clause Description Proposed Fee 

(13) For furnishing certificate of birth $ 6.00 

(13A) For furnishing abstract copy of a birth record $ 4.00 

(20) For filing certificate of a person conducting business $20.00 
under any title other than his real name (DBA Filing) 

(21) For filing by a person conducting business under any $10.00 
title other than his real name a statement of change of 

his residence, or of his discontinuance, retirement or 
withdrawal from, or change of location of such business 
(30) For furnishing a certificate of death $ 6.00 

(42) For entering notice of intention of marriage and issuing $20.00 
certificates thereof 

(44) For issuing certificate of marriage $ 6.00 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 18. That the town authorize the revised fees as specified in the 
article. 

Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 1 9. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for the purchase 
of fire resistive safes and/or vaults to safeguard the records of the Town Clerk, 
Collector and Treasurer's Offices, by borrowing or otherwise, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk-Collector-Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 19. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for computer 
software for use on the personal computer in the Town Clerk and Collector's Office 
at the Town Administration Building, by borrowing or otherwise, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk-Collector-Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 20. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money for the purchase 
of a service/maintenance agreement(s) for the personal computers in the Town 
Administration Building or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk-Collector-Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 21 . That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 1, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to allow the Board of Selectmen, acting 
as or with the Computer Study Committee to purchase Personal Computers, 
hardware, software and training for the Health Department and other Town 
Departments for the purchase and expansion of the Town Hall Personal Computers. 
Further that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or votes under the appropriate 
section of the Massachusetts General Law and that the Treasurer be authorized 
to combine this borrowing with any other borrowing authorized by this Town 
Meeting. 

Sponsored by the Board of Health 

Voted Article 22. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 



-31 - 



Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will purchase a new copying machine to be 
located on the second floor of the Town Hall to be used by the Health Department, 
Building Department, Wiring Inspector, Plumbing and Gas Inspector, Election 
Commission, Veterans Agent, Conservation Commission and others; and or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Health Department, Building Department, Wiring Inspector, 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector, Election Commission, Veterans Agent, and 
Conservation Commission. 

Voted Article 23. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
by borrowing or otherwise to hire a consultant to prepare a long-term Capital 
Improvement Plan. 

Capital Improvements Committee 

Voted Article 24. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
to paint the exterior and interior of the Central Fire Station or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 25. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
to purchase a new car for the Fire Chief or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 26. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
to install an exhaust system for the fire vehicles at the Central Station and also 
at the Engine #2 station or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 27. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
to replace the front apron of the Central Fire Station or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 28. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
for the purpose of purchasing certain equipment and/or supplies and/or software 
to be used in conjunction with the Public Safety computer system or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Fire Chief 

Voted Article 29. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 1, 1989 



Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $9,125 for 
the purpose of immunizing all regular members of the Police and Fire Departments 
against the Hepatitis-B virus or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Ambulance Oversight Committee Fire Department and 
Police Department 

Voted Article 30. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to purchase two new patrol cars for 
the Police Department and to trade in two existing patrol cars and appropriate 
a sum of money therefor or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 31 . That the town authorize the Police Chief to purchase two 
replacement automobiles and that the sum of $28,024 be appropriated therefor 
and further that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to dispose of the replaced 
vehicles through sale or trade. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to purchase a personal computer with 
emulation and associated software to be used by the Police Department and 
appropriate a sum of money therefor or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Police Department 

Voted Article 32. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
sidewalk maintenance at various locations, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 33. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise for Fences and Guardrails or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 34. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise to purchase one truck and trade one 1977 Ford Van or 
take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 35. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise to purchase a Screener for composting materials or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 36. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise to purchase a Vacuum Unit for the Sewer Jetter or take 



-33- 



any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 37. That the town appropriate the sum of $32,000 for the purpose 
specified in the article and further that the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen be authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds 
or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 
7 Sub-section 9 and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing 
with any other borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting and further that the 
service on this debt shall be raised through a sewer use fee. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Counted Vote: 217 Yes; 30 No 
ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the beautification of the outside area of the Town Hall or take any action relative 
thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 38. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the repairs and maintenance to the Chapel at the Cemetery or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 39. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
road maintenance in the Cemetery or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 40. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

Vote to combine Articles 41, 42, 43 and 44. Unanimous. 
ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the Secondary Treatment/Force Main to Lynn design, by borrowing or otherwise, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 
ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
the design of a Secondary Treatment Plant and the appurtenances thereto or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 
ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
repairs at the Sewerage Treatment Plant, or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 
ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise for the Inflow/Infiltration elimination or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Articles 41 , 42, 43 and 44 that action on these articles be postponed 

indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
preventative maintenance for the Administration Building and Fish House or take 
any action relative thereto. 



-34- 



Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 45. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to 
purchase additional Lab Equipment for the Wastewater Treatment Plant or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 46. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for 
repairs at the Wastewater Treatment Plant during 1987 and 1988 or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 47. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise for a geotechnical/structure study for the Essex Street 
bridge approach ramps. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 48. That the town appropriate the sum of $7,500 for the purpose 
specified in the article. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money by 
borrowing or otherwise for a fence and guardrails at the Essex Street bridge. 

Sponsored by the Department of Public Works 

Voted Article 49. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds 
by borrowing or otherwise to repair and reconstruct Blocksidge Field for football 
and soccer. To continue the second year of a five-year plan to rehabilitate all fields 
in the Town, or to take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Richard G. Baker, Athletic Director and Recreation Commission 

Voted Article 50. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 

Date: June 12, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to purchase and install Boilers and/or Air Atomizing, 
forced draft burners and Asbestos removal. This is the second year of a planned 
four-year program to carry out the Design Engineer's program, or take any action 
relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 51. That the town appropriate the sum of $139,000 for the 
purposes specified in the article, except for asbestos removal, and that the 
Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow this amount 
through the issuance of bonds or notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 44 Section 7 Sub-section 3A and that the Treasurer is 
authorized to combine this borrowing with any other borrowing authorized by this 
Town Meeting. 

Date: May 2, 1989 



- 35 - 



Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, for the installation of energy conservation windows at 
the various Swampscott Public Schools, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 52. That the town appropriate the sum of $33,000 for the 
installation of energy conservation type windows at the Stanley School and that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow this 
amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 7 Sub-section 3B and that the 
Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing with any other borrowing 
authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to replace and repair the roofs of Stanley School, 
Swampscott High School and Hadley School and include the Design Services, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 53. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to purchase replacement student furniture at various 
schools, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 54. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, for computers and related hardware for various schools, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 55. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, for the purchase of a passenger van for the 
transportation of students, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 56. That the town appropriate the sum of $20,000 for the purpose 
specified in the article. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to authorize the Department of Public Works to 
undertake repairs, reconstruction, or to resurface hot top areas at various schools, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 57. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to purchase and install a new Little Theatre Stage 



-36- 



Lighting System at Swampscott High School, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 58. That the town appropriate the sum of $35,000 for the purpose 
specified in the article and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen 
be authorized to borrow this amount through the issuance of bonds or notes under 
the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 7 Sub-section 
3A and that the Treasurer be authorized to combine this borrowing with any other 
borrowing authorized by this Town Meeting. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the necessary funds, 
by borrowing or otherwise, to install a security system in each of the following 
Schools, Hadley, Clarke, Machon and Swampscott Junior High, or to take any 
action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the School Committee 

Voted Article 59. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: June 12, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money, by 
borrowing or otherwise, to complete the renovation of the Library patio or take 
any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by the Board of Library Trustees 

Voted Article 60. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 61 . To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money, by borrowing 
or otherwise, for the purchase of a portable two-way radio for the Swampscott 
Dog Officer or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by Dog Officer Francis A. Dube 

Voted Article 61 . That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will amend the General By-laws of the Town 

of Swampscott in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 42 of the Acts of 1 988 

by adding a new section to Article III as follows: 

Section 9. The due date for the payment of municipal charges and bills other 
than taxes shall be 30 days from the date of mailing. Further that the rate 
at which interest shall accrue if such charges remain unpaid after such due 
dates shall be the rate at which interest may be charged on tax bills under 
the provisions of Section 57 of Chapter 59, MGLA. 

or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Collector and Treasurer Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 62. That the town amend the General By-Laws of the Town of 

Swampscott as specified in the article. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 140 Section 147A and adopt the following 
amendment to the Town of Swampscott General By-laws by adding thereto a new 
section in Article V as follows: 

14C. Notwithstanding the provisions of MGL Chapter 140, Section 137 or any 
other provision of law to the contrary, the annual fees to be charged by the 
Town of Swampscott for the issuance of licenses for dogs shall be: 



-37- 



Males, females, sprayed females $10.00 

Further, should any owner or keeper of a dog fail to license that dog before 
February 1 (or the first business day after January 31), that owner or keeper 
shall pay a late fee of $5.00 before obtaining said license, excepting a dog 
brought into the Town as provided in Section 138 of Chapter 140, MGLA, 
or take any action relative thereto. 

Sponsored by Town Clerk Jack L. Paster 

Voted Article 63. That the town accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 140 Section 147A and amend the Town of Swampscott's 
General By-Laws as specified in the article. 

Date: May 2, 1989 

Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter Three, Section 1 
of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the Town shall elect three 
Selectmen for three-year staggered terms with the candidate receiving the highest 
vote elected to serve a three-year term; the candidate receiving the second highest 
vote will be elected to serve a two-year term; the candidate receiving the third 
highest vote will be elected to serve a one-year term. Thereafter each year, one 
member will be elected for a three-year term." 
Sponsored by Robert E. Perry 

Voted Article 64. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter Three, Section 1 
of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the Town shall elect five Selectmen 
for one year with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson and at 
each annual Town election thereafter, the voters shall elect five Selectmen for 
one year with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson." 
Sponsored by Robert E. Perry, et.al. 

Voted Article 65. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to amend Chapter Three, Section 1 
of the Town's Charter as follows: "the voters of the Town shall elect three 
Selectmen for one year with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson 
and at each annual Town election thereafter, the voters shall elect three Selectmen 
for one year with the candidate receiving top vote becoming chairperson." 
Sponsored by Robert E. Perry, et.al. 

Voted Article 66. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Majority Vote 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town 
of Swampscott in the following manner: 

By deleting the following lots from the B-1 District and placing them in the 
A-3 District: 

Plate No. 1: Lots Nos. 118 and 18 

Plate No. 3: Lots Nos. 23, 81 A, 81 B, 82, 102, 109 

Plate No. 5: Lot No. 152 

Plate No. 6: Lots Nos. 236, 176, 180, 56, 183, 130B 
Plate No. 7: Lots Nos. 150, 101, 101 A, 118A, 113 
Plate No. 13: Lots Nos 28, 34 and 

By deleting Lot No. 40. Plate 27, from the B-1 District and placing it in the 
A-2 District and 



- 38 - 



By deleting Lot No. 92, Plate No. 4, from the B-1 District and placing it in 
the A-2A District, or take any action relative thereto. 
Sponsored by the Land Use Subcommittee 

Voted Article 67. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise, by borrowing 
or otherwise, under any general or special law which authorizes the Town to raise 
money by borrowing or otherwise, such sums of money as may be necessary for 
any and all of the purposes mentioned in the foregoing articles. 
Sponsored by the Board of Selectmen 

Voted Article 68. That action on this article be postponed indefinitely. 
Date: May 2, 1989 
Unanimous Vote 



-39- 



Swampscott 1989 Town Meeting Attendance Report 

PRECINCT NAME 3/27 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/11 6/12 6/13 

1 Alex, Annette M. OXOOOOO 

Alex, John O X X X O X O 

Allen, Jean X X X X X X X 

Alpert, Julius X X X X X X X 

Bates, Wallace T. XXXXXOX 

Bickford, Barbara X X X X X X X 

Blonder, Cindy M. XXXXXXX 

Blonder, Jeffrey S. X X X X X X X 

Butler, Jeanne X X 

Callahan, Maureen A. X X X X X O O 

Callahan, Richard M. XXOOXOO 

Chaves, Jonas X X X X X X X 

Choinard, Madeline X X X X O X X 

Corso, Brenda — X X X X X X 

Cropley, John H. Jr. XXXXXXX 

Daley, John R. XXXXOXX 

DiLisio, David O O X X O O O 

DiLisio, Vincent R. 0X00X00 

Dolan, Grace X X X X X X X 

Dorson, Harold B. XOOOOXX 

Dorson, Sylvia B. XXXXXXX 

Doyle, William O X X X X X X 

Greco, Frederick O X X X X O X 

Green, Joyce X X X X X X X 

Green, Lawrence X X X X X X X 

Guarnieri, Carl X X X X X X X 

Harrington, Vera C. OXXXXXX 

Harris, Ethel X X X X X X X 

Hill, Allen O X X X O X O 

Hoffman, John — X X X X X O 

Hyde, William R. XXXXXXX 

Kaloust, Gerald X X X X X X X 

Kaloust, Roberta X X X X X X X 

Kearney, Sheila P. XXXXXXX 

Ladhani, Azad X O X 

Legere, David J. OXXXXXX 

Legere, J. Arthur O X X X X O O 

Leonard, Timothy M. XXXXXXX 

Mackey, William E. — X X X X X X 

McGrath, Marianne M. OXXXXXX 

Mitchell, Bernice — X X X X X X 

Nigrelli, Eugene X X X X X X X 

Noonan, Jane O X X X O X X 

Palleschi, Michael A. XXXXXXO 

Perry, Robert E. XXXXXOO 

Picariello, Lawrence X X X X X X X 

Simeone, Mary B. — X X X X X X 

Simeone, Salvatore J. — X X X X X X 

Speranza, Alfred C. OXXXXXO 

Speranza, Frances N. OXOXXXO 

Tamborini, Thomas X X X X X X X 

Waldfogel, Peter D. OOOXXOO 



-40- 



NAME 

Whittier, Douglas 
Yanofsky, Phillip S. 

Bard en, Barbara 
Barden, Eugene 
Barr, Barbara 
Beatrice, Colleen 
Bowen, David. 
Boyce, Thomas J. Jr. 
Brine, Phillip A. Jr. 
Buonopane, Susan 
Buonopane, William 
Cassetta, James 
Cassidy, John R. 
Cassidy, Peter, J. 
Casso, Mark 
Doherty, John J. 
Drucas, Chris 
Dube, Angela 
Dube, John R. 
Gambale, Mary Jane 
Gambale, Michael 
Gookin, Merry L. 
Haley, Douglas H. 
Haley, Linda 
Hallion, William 
Hughes, John J. Jr. 
Hughes, Nancy 
Jarvis, Nancy 
Keddie, James 
Keliy, Barbara 
Kelly, Gordon Jr. 
Kenney, Judith A. 
LaConte, Louise M. 
LaConte, Vincent 
Leahy, Sheila T. 
Lesnever, Leland 
Lesnever, Marjorie 
Luck, Claudia 
Marcou, Martha 
Mariano, Paula 
McCarriston, Richard 
Newhall, Linda A. 
Newhall, Walter E. 
O'Shea, John 
Ott, Margaret 
Pagnotti, Paul E. 
Paster, Jack L. 
Perry, Christopher 
Reagan, John 
Scanlon, Thomas M. 
Sherry, Joan 
Sherry, Paul 



3/27 5/1 


5/2 


5/3 


5/11 


6/12 


6/13 


v 
a 


V 
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PRECINCT 



NAME 

Squires, Deborah 
Squires, John Jr. 
Warnock, Sharyn 
Weiss, Bette 

Balliro, Anita 
Breen, Kevin 
Brunner, Michael 
Chesley, Bruce R. 
Clain, Christopher 
Conrad, Louis E. 
Croft, Paul 
Cullen, C. Paige Jr. 
Davis, Murray 
Dugan, Ellen 
Farwell, Donna L. 
Fields, Scott 
Garvey, Ellen 
Garvey, Michael 
Gilbert, Michael 
Gorman, Clare M. 
Gorman, Paul J. 
Greenbaum, Lawrence 
Hendrickson, Ruth E. 
Holmes, Betty 
Hootnick, Lewis E. 
Huber, Carol M. 
Huber, Richard 
Hyde, William Jr. 
Jacobs, Scott 
Kane, John C. 
Kelly, Daniel P. 
Kester, Anita H. 
Koscielecki, Martha J. 
Krumhansl, Ruth 
Longley, Roberta 
MacDonald, Jane P. 
Modini, Louis 
Moltz, Sandra 
Nestor, Paul R. Jr. 
O'Connor, Evelyn 
O'Connor, Leighton M. 
Olson, Nancy 
Parton, Bennett 
Perry, Gerard 
Polsky, Melvin 
Smith, Huntley E. 
Souppa, Ralph A. Jr. 
Spinale, Dominic 
Terrell, Darla 
Terrell, John 
Thompson, Mark J. 
Trapasso, Joyce M. 



3/27 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/11 6/12 6/13 

— X X X X X X 



-42- 



PRECINCT NAME 

Walsh, Catherine 
Warren, Thomas 
Wasserman, Steven 
Wennik, Joanne 
Wittlinger, Ellen 

4 Baker, Janet 
Baker, Richard 
Balsama, Joseph 
Beatrice Peter R. Ill 
Beatrice, Carol A. 
Buckley, Susan 
Bush, Ann M. 
Calichman, Harvey 
Carden, Nancy 
Cassidy, Francis J. 
Cassidy, Patricia E. 
Cassidy, Peter J. II 
Cassidy, Tara L. 
Cesarz, Martha 
DeCamp, Margaret 
DiMento, Carol A. G. 
DiMento, William R. 
Donelan, Robert E. 
Dragoni, Anthony 
Drummond, Brian 
Finn, Marvin 
Gold, John A. 
Hughes, Patrick 
Kelleher, Martha Gene 
Kiely, Leslie S. 
Kline, Alan D. 
Krippendorf, Edward W. 
Martin, Michael J. 
Mazola, Ernest J. 
McHugh, Joseph 
McHugh, Mary A. 
Morrison, Charles E. 
Murphy, Brian 
Murphy, Patricia M. 
Murphy, Robert W. 
Nelson, Corrine 
Nichols, Nancy B. 
Page, Donald M. 
Peretsman, Eva B. 
Phelan, John V. Ill 
Portnoy, Linda 
Proctor, Sue E. 
Rozen, Nancy 
Santanello, Daniel 
Shanahan, Patricia 
Shanahan, William 
Sherr, Mary Lou B. 



3/27 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/11 6/12 6/13 



-43- 



PRECINCT NAME 3/2: 

Sinatra, Joseph — 

Small, Margaret X 

Smith, James E. X 

Watson, Brian T. O 

Weaver, Sharon X 

Webster, Floyd W. O 

Whitkin, Nancy L. O 

5 Bane, Richard C. X 

Belhumeur, Cynthia H. — 

Belhumeur, R. Thomas — 

Bloch, Israel X 

Burke, John F. X 

Callahan, J. Christopher X 

Cassidy, Catherine X 

Clarke, Marie J. X 

Driscoll, Thomas. H. X 

Gallo, Louis X 

Goldberg, Deborah E. X 

Goldstein, Francine X 

Goldstein, Stanley X 

Greenberg, Linda X 

Hansen, Andrew M. X 

Hennessey, Mersine X 

Hennessey, William X 

Herwitz, Carla B. — 

Herwitz, David R. — 

Ingram, Robert X 

Kahn, Beverly X 

Leidner, Alice R. X 

Maitland, Richard E. X 

McVie, Robert L. X 

Morgan, Joanne X 

Murphy, Kent F. X 

Nellis, Veeder C. X 

O'Brien, Timothy X 

O'Brien, Vincent P. X 

O'Brien, William L X 

Perlman, Harriet . X 

Reardon, Carl D. X 

Rogers, Roberta O 

Rotner, Howard E. X 

Rotner, Sandra T. X 

Rudolph, James L. X 

Salinsky, Jody O 

Salter, Richard H. X 

Shapiro, Mary J. X 

Shore, Geraldine X 

Shore, Warren J. X 

Sklar, Albert J. X 

Sklar, Selma X 

Smullin, Alix X 

Tarmy, Rhonda X 



5/1 


5/2 


5/3 


5/11 


6/12 


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/\ 


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-44- 



PRECINCT 



NAME 

Valleriani, Catherine 
Vatcher, Howard M. 
Vatcher, Theresa J. 
Waelde, Carmen S. 
Weinstein, Janice 
Winston, Alice J. 
Wollerscheid, William 
York, Francis A. 
York, Phyllis A. 

Babcock, Donald H. 
Babcock, Elizabeth A. 
Bayard, Susan 
Belkin, Sylvia 
Blonder, Susan A. 
Callahan, James C. 
Cleveland, Pamela 
Dembowski, Clare 
Dembowski, Henry S. 
Dunn, David A. 
Dussault, Barbara R. 
Erlich, Norman A. 
Feinberg, Richard R. 
Feldman, Saul J. 
Glosband, Merrily 
Goldberg, Arthur 
Goldman, Martin C. 
Goldstein, Joy 
Grab, Barbara 
Gupta, Mary M. K. 
Kaplan, .Susan 
Kimmel, Faith. R. 
Kimmel, Sidney R. 
Klayman, Nancy 
Koidin, Jill 
Kraft, Lori 
Kravetz, Myer 
Kravetz, Phyllis 
Lack, Janet C. 
LaPeer, Susan Nault 
Light, Jonathan 
Lilly, James M. 
Maloney, Betty Ann 
Morrison, Julie M. 
Mulroy, Esther D. 
Mulroy, Michael 
Navon, Ann 
Oppenheim, Reeva 
Palleschi, Arthur J. 
Palleschi, Edward A. 
Patrinos, Chris G. 
Schwartz, Cheryl 
Schwartz, Janet S. 



3/27 5/1 5/2 5/3 5/11 6/12 6/13 



-45- 



PRECINCT NAME 

Sega!. Maddy 
Sheckman, Sandra 
Shoer, Faith R. 
Shribman, Peter 
Shutzer, Kenneth B. 
Smith, Jeanne M. 
Spartos, Mary Anne 
Stoli, Gayle 
Taymore, Jack J. 
Whittemore, Ann 
Wistran, Julia A. 



3/27 5/1 5/2 5/3 

— X X X 
X X X X 
O X X X 

— X X X 
X X X X 
X X X X 
X X X X 
X X X X 
X X X X 

— X X X 
X X X X 



5/11 6/12 6/13 

XXX 
XXX 
OXO 
O X X 
XXX 
X O X 
XXX 
XXX 
XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 
JACK L. PASTER 

On July 1, 1989, a new and innovative cash management program was 
instituted between the Collector and the town's depository bank which was 
designed to increase interest earnings for the town. 

With the cooperation of the Finance Committee and Town Meeting a line item 
was added to the Collector's budget which allowed for an appropriation to cover 
the cost of services previously being provided by our bank (printing of property 
tax bills, automobile excise tax computer service bureau, bonded bank messenger 
pick-ups and all banking related services). 

With that appropriation in hand to purchase the goods and services we need 
to conduct the town's day-to-day tax collection effort, we established a program 
of investment which takes each days' receipts and "sweeps" that money into an 
overnight investment vehicle... automatically each and every day. Weekly turnover 
checks to the Treasurer are deducted from the investable balance before the 
"sweep" which means that every dollar received at the Collector's window is 
invested immediately and begins to earn interest for the town at money market 
rates throughout the year. 

Your collector earned $12,084.35 from July 1 to December 31 with this new 
program. Annual earnings of approximately $25,000 are expected. 

FINES INCREASE FOR RETURNED CHECKS 

The state law concerning the handling of returned (aka "bounced") checks 
was changed on October 19, 1989. The law increases the fine from a minimum 
of $5.00 to $25.00 or one percent of the face amount of the returned check, which 
ever is greater. 

Hopefully, this increase in fines will curb the returned check problem in 
Swampscott. 

STANDARDIZED PENALTY INTEREST 

The 1989 Town Meeting approved an amendment to the town's By-Laws which 
now sets the penalty interest for the late payment of any tax, fee or municipal 
charge at the same rate as the penalty interest on late property tax payments. 
The new rate is 14 percent per annum, computed per day, retroactive to the date 
of mailing for any bill tendered after the due date. 

IN ACCOUNT WITH THE TOWN OF SWAMPSCOTT - 1989 



COLLECTIONS: 

Real Estate Taxes $12,850,948.39 

Personal Property Taxes 134,250.21 

Automobile Excise Taxes 834,630.60 

Water Use Charges 1,047,211.84 

Water Liens 38,801.59 

Sewer Assessments 25,414.90 

Water Service Charges 20,216.99 

Harbor Mooring Fees 4,963.00 

Boat Excise Taxes 7,102.00 

Rubbish Collection Fees 14,542.50 

Departmental Accounts Receivables 

Pensions 32,936.81 

School Tuition 433,667.50 

Rentals (Fish House, etc.) 14,830.90 



-47- 



Interest and Charges 

Real Estate/Personal Property Tax Interest 62,038.13 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Interest 2,567.91 

Water Use and Water Service Interest 4,426.00 

Water Lien Interest 4,433.23 

Sewer Interest 4,583.81 

Other Interest/Fees 198.61 

Charges and Demand Fees 11,892.00 

Fees for By-Law Packages 1,305.00 

Fees for Copying/Certifying Public Records 4,599.55 

Fees for Preparing Cert, of Municipal Lien 12,525.00 

Fines Assessed on Returned Checks 1,593.24 

Collector's Cash Management Interest Earnings 12,084.35 

(July to December) 

Total Collected — January 1 to December 31, 1989 $15,581,764.06 



TREASURER OF SWAMPSCOTT 
JACK L. PASTER 

A record $194,460.94 in interest earnings was posted by your treasurer during 
1989 through the aggressive handling of municipal funds. 

With constant hands-on attention, money is never allowed to sit idle in non- 
interest bearing bank accounts. Every dollar is always hard at work earning interest 
which ends up in the town's Free Cash account to be appropriated by Town 
Meeting, often to reduce the tax levy. 

The financial markets are studied on a daily basis as we seek out the best 
possible rates and terms for our investments. Safety, liquidity and yield are what 
we look for and due to the relationships we've established with the banking 
community, bidding on Swampscott money is always sharp. 

Since taking office in 1983, your treasurer has earned $1,111,906.94 in 
earnings on investments for the Town of Swampscott. 

SEWER BOND ISSUE 

Now that the town has decided to send its sewage to the City of Lynn for 
processing and disposal, plans are underway to finance the project through the 
issuance of long-term municipal bonds to be sold in the national market. 

A formal Request for Proposals (RFP) for financial advisory and bond 
certification services was sent to the major banks in our local area and throughout 
the Metropolitan Boston market. 

Seven proposals were received and carefully scrutinized by both your treasurer 
and an independent financial expert who volunteered his services to review each 
proposal and make a recommendation as to which plan would be in the best 
interests of the community. 

A proposal from Eastern Bank in Lynn was judged to be the best from all 
standpoints. Ove Lien and Robert Donelan, both Swampscott residents, will serve 
as the town's financial advisors for the sewer project. They both bring a level of 
experience and expertise in municipal bonding matters which will guarantee 
successful bond sales in connection with this project. 

It should also be noted that due to the aggressive competitive bidding in 
response to our RFPs, Eastern Bank's bid was judged to have the lowest bottom- 
line cost to the community. 



-48- 



TREASURER'S CASH STATEMENT 

In Account With the Town of Swampscott: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1989 $ 1,901,207.65 

Receipts and income from all sources 30,41 1 ,357.91 

Less Warrants Paid (PayrollA/endors) 27,709,609.97 

Balance on hand December 31, 1989 4,602,955.59 

Interest Income Earned during 1989 = $194,460.94 

TRUST FUNDS - SPECIAL FUND ACCOUNTS 
Fund Bal. Deposit Int. With- Bal. 

ID 1/1/89 Income drawls 12/31/89 

School Funds: 

Phillips Medal $ 5,600 $ $ 490 $ 643 $ 5,447 
Cemetery Funds: 

Gifts/Bequests 73,993 6,718 7,198 73,513 

Perpetual Care 17,363 1,632 18,995 

Library Funds: 

Gen. Library Tr. 37,706 542 3,566 1,129 40,685 

R. Johnson 443 37 121 359 

H. Hussey 130,554 12,203 1,602 141,155 

Special Funds: 

Conservation Fund 32,361 3,0430 35,404 

Emp.H-L Trust 313,458 876,212 17,987 1,027,781 179,876 

Swampscott Drug 3,068 5,732 386 2,048 7,138 
Enforcement Fund 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Keith A. Callahan, Town Accountant 

In compliance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 61, 
I herewith submit to you the annual report of the Town Accountant for the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1989. Details of financial transactions of the Town are set 
forth in the accompanying schedule: 

1 . Balance Sheet 

2. Appropriation Report 

3. Schedule "A"* 

4. Debt Statement 

5. Analysis of Estimated Receipts vs. Actual Receipts 

* This is an annual report required by the State. A copy is filed with the U. S. 
Government. 



-49- 



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- 74 



SCHEDULE "A" 
GENERAL FUND REVENUE 

PART I 

Tax Collections 

Personal property taxes $ 163,138 

Real Estate taxes 12,688,464 

M.V. excise 986,571 

Vesses (boat) excise 5,650 

Penalty and interest - property taxes 77,860 

Penalty and interest - tax lien redemptions 3,616 

Penalty and interest - otehr taxes 64 

In New of taxes 1 1 ,950 

TOTAL 13,937,313 
Charges for Services 

Water usage charges 833,733 

Other water charges 24,464 

Penalty & interest - water 6,736 

Sewerage charges 33,987 

Other charges for services 72,606 

Fees 30,182 

Rentals 15,296 

TOTAL 1,017,004 

Licenses and Permits 

Alcoholic beverages licenses 17,450 

Other licenses and permits 59,276 

TOTAL 76,726 

Revenues from the State - Cherry Sheet 

Abatements to veterans 1 1 ,463 

Abatements to the elderly 26,879 

Police career incentive 44,104 

Veterans' benefits 5,188 

Additional assistance 1 ,007,203 

Lottery, beano, and charity 395,851 

Highway Fund 20,926 

Other revenue from state 4,627 

Other revenue from state 3,803 

TOTAL 1 ,520,044 
Revenues from State - Other 

Other revenue from state 53,71 1 
Revenues from Other Governments 

Court Fines 41 ,634 
Received from other municipalities for 

services performed 32,727 

TOTAL 74,361 

Fines and forfeitures 41 ,497 
Miscellaneous Revenues 

Sales of inventory 375 

Earnings on investments 206,955 

Other miscellaneous revenues 29,298 

TOTAL 236,628 



-75- 



Interfund Operating Transfers 

Transfers from special revenue fund 67,649 

Transfers from capital projects funds 1,173,480 

Transfer from agency funds 2,000 

TOTAL 1,243,129 

GRAND TOTAL $18,200,413 



-76- 



PART XV Reconciliation of Cash Receipts to Revenue and Cash 
Disbursements to Expenditures (All Funds) 



Reconcilation of Cash 

1. Cash Balance July 1, 1988 

a. Plus - Receipts 

b. Less - Disbursements 

2. Cash Balance June 30, 1989 

Reconciliation of Receipts to Revenues 

1 . Receipts, as reported above 

2. Less 

a. Refunds reported net of revenues 

b. Refunds reported net of expenditures 

c. Payroll withholdings 

d. Maturity of investments 

e. Agency funds 

f. Temporary borrowings 

g. Bond proceeds 

h. Bid Deposits 



Subtotal 

3. Plus 

a. Other adjustments 

b. Fees retained from tax collections 

c. Other adjustments 
Tailings 

Rounding off cents 
Trust 

Subtotal 

4. Total Revenues Reported 

Reconciliation of Disbursements to Expenditures 

1 . Disbursements, as reported above 

2. Less 

a. Refunds reported as net of revenues 

b. Refunds reported as net of expenditures 

c. Payroll withholdings 

d. Purchase of investments 

e. Agency funds 

f. Temporary borrowings 

g. Prior year warrant payments 

h. Bid deposits 
Subtotal 

3. Plus 

a. Current year warrants payable 

b. Trust Funds 
Subtotal 

4. Total Expenditures Reported 
Summary of Revenues and Expenditures 

1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Parts I and II - General Fund 
Parts III - School Systems 
Part VI - Intergovernmental Expenditures 
Part V - Special Revenue 
Part VII - Trust Funds 
Total 1 through 5 



$ (281,518) 
50,911,902 
50,975,020 

(344,636) 
50,911,902 



39,512 
11,917 
2,760,717 
20,643,840 
96,518 
5,244,020 
1,173,480 

2&£fi6 

29,996,670 






389 
2 

29,704 



30,095 
20,945,327 



50,975,020 

39,512 
11,917 
2,761,991 
21,116,847 
97,208 
5,244,020 
175,476 
26,666 
29,473,637 



173,106 

59 

173,165 

21,674,548 
Revenues 

16,957,284 
2,421,374 

579,623 
987,046 
20,945,327 



Expenditures 

10,973,041 
8,727,699 
549,469 
467,438 
956,901 

21,674,548 



- 77- 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS USED IN CALCULATING TAX 
RATE WITH ACTUAL RECEIPTS IN FISCAL YEAR ENDED 6/30/89 



State 


Estimated 


Actual 


Variance 


Chapter 70 


$ 974,610.00 


$ 974,610.00 


$ 


Additional Assistance 


1 ,007,203.00 


1,007,203.00 




School Transp. Prog. 


833.00 


39,714.00 


38,881.00 


Construction of Sch. Prog. 


232,929.00 


231,437.80 


(1,491.20) 


Tuition State Wards 


1 ,377.00 




(1 ,377.00) 


Aid to Public Libraries 


3,803.00 


3,803.00 




Police Career Incentive 


44,31 1 .00 


44,104.00 


(207.00) 


Veterans Benefits 


4,291.00 


5,187.85 


896.85 


Highway Fund 


20,926.00 


20,926.00 




Lottery 


395,851.00 


395,851.00 




1 pee nf Tjiypc, Vptpran°. 

LCjj ul 1 CIA V C IUI Gil 1 


11 201 00 


1 1 463 00 


262.00 


Less of Taxes Elderly 


25,046.00 


26,879.00 


1,833.00 


Multi Year Adjustments 


12,643.00 


12,643.00 




Rooming House Occupancy 




4,627.00 


4,627.00 


Tntfll Frnm Statp 
\ \j\ai i i \Jt 1 1 o laic 


2 735 024 00 


2 778 448 65 


43 424 65 


Town 








Motor Vehicle Excise 


898,418.66 


986,570.48 


88,151.82 


Penalties & Int. Taxes & Excise 


68,386.61 


75,367.48 


6,980.87 


Water 


900,557.76 


861,797.05 


(38,760.71) 


Ambulance 


27,723.05 


30,650.43 


2,927.38 


Libraries 


6,146.01 


8,159.00 


2,012.99 


Recreation 


29,295.50 


37,219.00 


7,923.50 


Other Departmental Revenue 


54,462.37 


72,686.70 


18,224.33 


Licenses & rermus 






lOI 1*5Q AtZ\ 


Sewer Assessments 


47,423.79 


33,986.56 


(13,437.23) 


Fines & Forfeits 


65,569.59 


74,347.07 


8,777.48 


Investment Income 


169,371.71 


206,955.27 


37,583.56 


Total - Town 


2,353,769.16 


2,447,014.69 


93,245.53 


GRAND TOTAL 


5,088,793.16 


5,225,463.34 


136,670.18 



-78- 



SCHEDULE OF CHANGES IN TOWN DEBT 
STATEMENT OF INDEBTEDNESS FISCAL YEAR ENDING 

JUNE 30, 1989 
Outstanding 



Funded Debt 

General Debt 
Inside Debt Limit 
Outside Debt Limit 

Total Funded Debt 
Bond Anticipation 
Authorized & 
Unissued 



July 1, 1988 



516,388 
1,880,776 



Issued 



2,150,400 
9,600 



Paid 



247,848 
355,934 



2,397,164 2,160,000 603,782 



Outstanding 
June 30, 1989 



2,418,940 
1,534,442 

3,953,382 



21,355,910 



AMBULANCE OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE 



Firefighter Kevin F. Breen, Secretary 
Officer Jeanne Butler 
Martin S. Plum 



Howard E. Rotner, M.D. 
Christine M. Wilson 
Lt. Richard Wilson 



The last vote of the Ambulance Oversight Committee demonstrated a firm 
commitment to the belief that all fire and police personnel should be inoculated 
against the Hepatitis B Virus. Research has indicated that this is the most pressing 
problem for emergency personnel in this decade. The committee, after lengthy 
evaluation, discussion, and consideration feels that this should be done at the 
Swampscott Department of Public Health. The Swampscott Public Health 
Department has agreed to this and the Oversight Committee has located two 
Registered Nurses willing to donate their time to inoculate personnel. This program 
was approved by Town Meeting in FY89. However, due to the failure of last year's 
override vote, monies were never appropriated to obtain the vaccine. 

One of the purposes of the Ambulance Oversight is to monitor the emergency 
medical training for the Town of Swampscott. This year the committee noted the 
termination of the available "Tri-City" courses with the resignation of the current 
provider. However, this year there have been several courses offered in town, as 
well as the availability of five private North Shore continuing education providers. 
Therefore, attention was focussed on offering Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to 
all Police and Fire personnel as required by state statute. This has been 
accomplished by two members of the Ambulance Oversight Committee, Firefighter 
Kevin Breen and Police Lieutenant Richard Wilson. This has resulted in a savings 
to the Town, not only from cost of the program per participant, but also due to 
the flexibility of scheduling. The Oversight Committee has also discussed and 
concluded that since the firefighters respond to all medical aid calls, it would be 
of benefit to the Town for the Firefighters to become Emergency Medical 
Technicians as are the Police. 

Issues concerning methods to provide ambulance service have been 
reintroduced: These include utilization of private service, volunteers, and Advanced 
Life Support. The Committee maintains that the Ambulance should continue to 
be operated by the Town of Swampscott. The committee continues to evaluate 
all methods of providing service as information becomes available. 



-79- 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Ann M. Whittemore, Chairman 
Charles Morrison, Vice Chairman William O'Brien 

Charles Hall, Clerk Kenneth B. Shutzer 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS: 

Anthony Pasciuto Peter Shribman 

The Zoning Board of Appeals held 11 meetings during the year ending 
December 31 , 1989; a total of 65 petitions were heard, of which 9 were continued 
from the previous year. We would like to thank Louis Gallo, Inspector of Buildings, 
for his technical support and assistance. The Associate Members of the Board 
contributed valuable assistance and expertise to the Board. During the course 
of the year, James L. Rudolph, Chairman, and Peter Beatrice III, Associate, 
resigned after having been elected to the Board of Selectmen, Kenneth Shutzer 
and Anthony Pasciuto were appointed to the Board as their respective 
replacements. Associate Member John Phelan III also resigned during the course 
of the year and Peter Shribman was appointed in his stead. Our thanks to our 
former members for their valuable service. 

Ann M. Whittemore was elected Chairman, Charles Morrison was elected Vice 
Chairman and Charles Hall was re-elected Clerk of the Board. 



DOG OFFICER - ANIMAL CONTROL 

Francis A. Dube 

Dogs Licensed 900 Dogs returned to owners 58 

Citations issued 196 Dogs P.T.S 3 

Dogs caught 80 Dogs/Cats placed for adoption . 4 

Dogs confined 11 Reported missing dogs/cats . . . 342 

Complaints received 406 Dogs/Cats transported to H. A. H. 13 

OFFENSES CHARGED 

Leash Law 73 Excessive barking 

Failure to license 113 Parks and beaches 

Pooper scooper 6 Warnings Issued 132 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Accidents involving dogs and cats 29 

Injured or sick dogs transported to H.A.H 7 

Dog bites reported 12 

INCOME 

Dog license fees $3,466.00 

Fines collected $3,485.00 



-80- 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Vera C. Harrington, Chairman 
Anthony F. Benevento Ernest J. Mazola 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its Annual Report for the citizens 
of the Town of Swampscott for the year 1989. 

Ernest J. Mazola was reelected to a three-year term. The Board and staff wish 
to express their congratulations to Anthony F. Benevento on his election as 
President of the Essex County Assessors Association. 

At the Board's reorganizational meeting, following the Town Election, Vera 
C. Harrington was elected Chairman and Anthony Benevento, Secretary. 

The Town of Swampscott implemented an update revaluation program, to 
be effective for Fiscal 1990, as mandated in compliance with Chapter 797, Acts 
of 1979 for full and fair cash value. Patriot Properties, Inc. of Peabody, Mass. who 
was awarded the contract in 1988, conducted the program. 

In the Spring of 1988, Patriot Properties implemented the program and 
conducted a data base assessment of the Town and generated and input said 
values into computers in the department, which were also provided by Patriot 
Properties, in accordance with the contract. All phases of the update were 
completed on a timely basis in accordance with requisites of the Department of 
Revenue. The firm also conducted a complete review of the town assessments. 

The availability of a fully computerized system and in-house administration 
has been a great asset to the Board and the staff in the ability to secure information 
and needed reports. 

The Department of Revenue certified values for the Town of Swampscott as 
submitted by Patriot Properties, Inc. for Fiscal 1990. 

The Board of Selectmen voted to split the tax rate for Fiscal 1990 at $9.23 
per thousand for property classified as residential, and $14.43 per thousand for 
property classified as commercial, industrial and personal property. 

The Board expresses its thanks to the Town Accountant, Keith Callahan, for 
his great assistance in transfer of in-house computer data and generating real 
estate tax bills. 

Also, the Board expresses thanks to Town Counsel Arthur Palleschi for his 
assistance in matters of litigation, and to other departments for their continued 
cooperation and support. 

Statutory Exemptions on real estate, which are mandatory under Chapter 59, 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to qualifying home owners 
totalled in the amount of $95,651 .86. 

The Board of Assessors herewith submits its figures to determine the tax rate 



for Fiscal Year 1990: 

I Gross amount to be raised $ 20,170,537.67 

Estimated receipts 6,835,398.60 

INet amount to be raised by taxation $ 13,335,139.07 

Real Estate valuation $1,377,664,750.00 

Personal Property valuation 8,254,200.00 

Total valuation $1,385,918,950.00 



-81 - 



Tax Rate Fiscal 1990: $ 9.23 Residential 
$ 9.23 Open Space 
$14.43 Commercial 
$14.43 Industrial 

Real Estate property tax $ 13 -2] 6,030 .96 

Personal Property tax Il9,i08.n 

Total taxes levied on property $ 13,335,139.07 

| II, AMOUNT TO BE RAISED] 

A. APPROPRIATIONS (col. (b) through col. (e) from Schedule B, Page 4) $ 1 9 . Q77 . B95 . fi 

B. OTHER AMOUNTS TO BE RAISED 

1. Amounts certified for lax title purposes $ 

2. Debt and interest charges not included in Schedule B $. 

3. Final court judgments $ 

4. Total overlay deficits of prior years $. 

5. Total cherry sheet offsets (see cherry sheet 1-ER) $ 

6. Revenue deficits $ 

7. Offset receipts deficits Ch. 44, Sec. 53E $ 

8. . — * 

9. — * 

TOTAL B (Total lines 1 through 9) $ 293, 339. C 



24.06 



C. STATE AND COUNTY CHERRY SHEET CHARGES (C.S. 1-EC cols. 1 and 2) $ 549 ' 303t( 

D. ALLOWANCE FOR ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS (OVERLAY) $ 250 f 000.( 

E. TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED (Total HA through I1D) $ 20,170, 537.( 

III. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER REVENUE SOURCES 1 

A. ESTIMATED RECEIPTS - STATE 

1. Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts (C.S. 1-ER Total Part D) $ 2 f 582,111.00 

2. Cherry Sheet Overestimates (C.S. 1-EC Pan E col. 3) $ 6,132.00 

TOTAL A (Total Lines 1 and 2) S 2,588,243.1 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS - LOCAL 

1. Local Receipts Not Allocated (Page 3, col. (b), Line 26) $ 3,296,755.60 

2. Offset Receipts (See Schedule A-l) $ 

3. Enterprise Funds (See Schedule A-2) $ 

TOTAL B (Total Lines 1 through 3) $ 3,296,755. 



REVENUE SOURCES APPROPRIATED FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSES 

1. Free Cash (Page 4, col. (c)) $ J.53,775,61 

2. Other Available Funds (Page 4, col. (d)) $ 367,629.00 

TOTAL C (Toul Lines 1 and 2) $ 52UGjL 



OTHER REVENUE SOURCES APPROPRIATED SPECIFICALLY TO 
REDUCE THE TAX RATE 

1. Free Cash . . . .date of appropriation ( 5 / 1 / 89) $ 428.995.39 

2. Municipal Light Source $ 

3. Other Source (Specify) $ 

TOTAL D (Total Lines 1 through 3) $. 

TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER REVENUE SOURCES 

(Total II1A through UID) * 6,835,398. 



428,995. 



[IV. SUMMARY OF TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED AND TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES 

FILL IN AFTER PAGE 1 IS COMPLETE 

A TOTAL AMOUNT TO BE RAISED (from HE) t 20.170.537. 

B TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND OTHER 

REVENUE SOURCES (from HIE) % 6.835,398.6 

C TOTAL REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX LEVY (from IC) t 13.335,139.0 7 

D TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES (TOTAL IVB plus IVC) * 20,170,537. 

OVA MUST EQUAL IVt 

-82- 



Motor vehicles assessed (not figured in tax rate) 

Numbers of cars assessed $ 12,018 

Valuation of cars assessed $ 39,596,350.00 

Excise tax on cars assessed $ 869,867.13 



Respectfully Submitted, 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Vera C. Harrington, Chairman 
Anthony F. Benevento, Secretary 
Ernest J. Mazola 



-83- 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 



Louis Gallo, Inspector of Buildings . 

Alternate Building Inspectors 
Kathleen Magee Richard Macintosh 
Helen M. Collins, Administrative Assistant 

I hereby submit the following report for 1989: 

Amount of Construction $5,332,476 

Permits Issued Building 320 

Plumbing 
325 

Gas 248 

Fees collected for permits and inspections for building, plumbing 



and gas: $54,601 

Permits increased in all three departments. Amount of construction increased 
$438,268 and the increase in fees collected was $19,055. 

Building permits issued: 

Single Family 5 

Duplex 1 

Fireplaces, stoves, chimneys 3 

Additions 30 

Repairs, renovations and remodeling 80 

Roofs 60 

Decks, porches 50 

Garages 4 

Pools 9 

Greenhouses 3 

Signs 6 

Commercial 17 

Demolitions 1 1 

Elevator 1 

Miscellaneous 40* 
* Gutters, windows, doors, siding.stairs, etc. 



During the year there was a conversion from a variety store on Redington 
Street to a two family dwelling. There were conversions at 7-9 and 21 Superior 
St. under a Comprehensive Permit. 

Permits were issued for completion of 4 buildings, 8 units at the Shipswatch 
Project on Humphrey Street and work is continuing at the Preston Beach site on 
Atlantic Avenue. 

The department issues permits and inspects all construction. Town Zoning 
By-Laws are enforced as well as State Zoning Act and Building Code Safety 

Directives. 

Inspections are made at places of public assembly, institutions, lodging houses 
and schools. Violations of Zoning By-Laws are investigated. 



-84- 



BLOCKSIDGE FIELDHOUSE STUDY COMMITTEE 

A Committee formed to study and oversee the repair and renovation of the 
Blocksidge Fieldhouse located at the Town's Athletic Facility on Humphrey Street. 

Committee Members: 

John V. Phelan III Chairman 

Richard R. Feinberg 
William Hennessey 
Daniel Kelly 
Martha Cray Kelleher 
Kathleen Magee 

Consultants: 

Richard Coletti William Bush 

Richard Baker James Polando 

The Committee was initially formed relative to Article 82 of the 1988 Annual 
Town Meeting. The Committee first met in June of 1988 in order to assess the 
condition and long-term utilization requirements of the fieldhouse building. 

The building was found to be derelict in functional utility and suffer from 
extensive deferred maintenance. 

At following meetings, the Committee reviewed proposed plans, by two outside 
consulting and engineering firms, for the modernization and renovation of the 
building. 

At present Gale Associates Inc. has completed an acceptable plan for the 
repair and renovation of the fieldhouse. Within this plan, the building is to become 
fully handicap accessible and the plumbing, heating, and electrical service are 
to be updated. In addition, a new Trainer's room and weight room are to be 
constructed. 

Directly impacting this project though, is the presence of an asbestos encased 
boiler and expansion tank inside the building. At this time, an asbestos removal 
schedule is still undefined. This removal schedule directly impacts the construction 
schedule of this project. We are presently attempting to resolve the asbestos issue 
in order to proceed. 

The Committee would like to thank all of the Town Boards, employees and 
individuals for their help and cooperation with this project. 



John F. Burke 
Tom Belhumeur 
Daniel C. Cahill 
Paul Gorman 



PERSONNEL BOARD 
Paul E. Garland, Chairman 
Ann M. Whittemore, Clerk Keith A. Callahan 

Peter C. McCarriston Richard C. Bane 

In accordance with Section 3 (f) of the Personnel Board By-laws, the Personnel 
Board herewith submits its thirtieth annual report to the Board of Selectmen and 
to the citizens of the Town of Swampscott. 

The Personnel Board met several times during the past year to act on matters 
brought before it by various boards, department heads, and individuals. 
Subsequent decisions were made and implemented and a number of Articles were 
sponsored in the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting. The Board wishes to thank 
all town boards and individuals who have given us assistance and cooperation 
during the year. 



-85 - 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Charles R. Borgioli, Chairman 
Louise LaConte Ken Maas 

Gary Young Bruce Gordon Paula Mariano 

The Cable Advisory Committee has continued to monitor the performance 
of the licensee, Warner Cable. Emphasis has been in several areas: local 
origination and public access programming, quality of signal, service response 
and complaints. Warner has continued to work on these areas with continual 
improvements. 

Several significant changes occurred in 1989. Tim Carlisle, the General 
Manager responsible directly for Swampscott, left the company to pursue other 
interests. The Committee wishes Tim much success in his new venture. Tim's 
leaving caused a restructuring of Warners management with two individuals now 
having general responsibilities of the Swampscott system. 

The second significant change was the purchase of Warner by Time/Life. 
There were also other unsuccessful take-over attempts of Warner and Time/Life. 
At the present time, the committee is working with Warner and the Board of 
Selectmen in transfering the license to the new owners. 

The third change was in federal legislation regulating ownerships of certain 
programs and the blacking out of these programs in certain markets that the owners 
may request. This affected the Committees efforts to bring back the three network 
alternate channels (Ch. 6, 10, 12) as much of the programming would be blacked 
out. Work is still ongoing to provide pre-empted programs on alternate channels. 

The Committee is pleased to have a new member, Paula Mariano, join the 
committee. She is able to do much of the program reviewing that will lead to the 
return of selected shows that were lost when channels 6, 10 and 12 were eliminated. 

Progamming from the public began on local access channel 14 with the birth 
of Blarney Broadcasting, a group of local people dedicated to providing coverage 
of local youth sports. The non-profit group broadcasts weekly on channel 14 and 
is a very good locally produced show. 

Once again in November Warner announced a rate increase and channel 
changes. Several of the changes this time were a result of a survey conducted 
by Warner at the Committee's request. We will continue to work closely with Warner 
to provide the best available service to the Town. 

The committee urges more people to utilize the public access facilities and 
equipment that Warner has provided to the Town. Warner will provide training 
in the use of the equipment, studio and playback equipment. This is a valuable 
asset to the Town and should be utilized more. 

The committee welcomes and encourages comments and suggestions from 
residents on how our cable TV system can be improved. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Richard Maitland, Director 
The Department of Civil Defense was on standby status during the Hurricane 
season this fall. We reviewed our plans and tested equipment for operational 
readiness. Citizens should inspect emergency equipment for survival during natural 
and man-made emergencies. Informational pamphlets are available upon request 
from Your Civil Preparedness Agency. 



-86- 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Sarah P. Ingalls, Chairman 



David DiLisio 
Harold Keating 
Richard P. Mayor 



David McCarthy 
Lawrence Picariello 
Barbara Schaefer 



The Conservation Commission held nine meetings including five public 
hearings under the Wetland Protection Act on Requests for a Determination of 
Applicability. Permissions with conditions attached were granted on all five 
Requests. A new Order of Conditions was given to the DPW for cleaning up the 
old dump site behind the cemetery and, by the end of the year, that project was 
nearing completion. 

In November Barbara Schaefer was appointed to the Commission, bringing 
its membership to its full complement of seven. 

The Conservation Commission is grateful to the Boy Scouts who, under the 
leadership of William Rogers, mapped out a trail through the Harold King Forest. 
In the Fall, a walk was held over the new trail and more walks are planned for 
the future. It is hoped that the Scouts will continue their interest in the Forest so 
that the trail can be properly maintained. 

There were clean-up projects on the other Conservation properties, and the 
Commission would like to thank the DPW for their cooperation in making these 
clean-ups a success. 



James Kapoll 

The year started on a high note, with the delivery of a 20 passenger, wheel 
chair lift bus. The purchase was authorized by the Town Meeting in May and a 
committee of three, Jack Burke, Richard Bane, and Martin Plum did the searching 
for the best bus for our money. With the arrival of the bus the senior's felt like 
teenagers who just got their WHEELS. Day trips were taken North to New 
Hampshire, West to the Berkshires, South to Fall River, and East to Rockport, 
Boston to the theater was also included. All trips were oversubscribed and in some 
cases duplicate trips were made so that no one was left out. The bus has reopened 
the world for those seniors who are no longer able to drive themselves. 

Like all other departments, our budget cuts had an adverse affect on our plans. 
We had to forego the increase in the Center hours. We could not institute many 
programs that are needed in our Town, outreach, friendly visitors, and others. The 
many social events which were partially subsidized and held outside of the Center, 
were held at the Senior Center and the seniors were called upon to pay all of the 
costs. We are managing to continue most of the essential services to the seniors. 

Our 15 year old dishwasher finally washed its last dish, but the Rotary Club 
of Swampscott came through, when they heard of the problem. They replaced 
it for us, and we are again able to store the plastic utensils. 

The 4th and 5th grade students from the Hadley School have visited the 
seniors on various occasions and have entertained. The 6th grade students from 
the Stanley School have brightened the tables by making place mats for the lunch 
program. Their visits and participation always brings pleasure to the seniors. 

The Clerk/Coordinator position which we were able to fill with money from 
a state grant has been a tremendous help in keeping the seniors and the Center 




Ruth Roche, Treasurer 
Lorraine Pelletier, Secretary 
Alice Jane Winston 



Vincent P. O'Brien 
Roberta Kaloust 
Herman Goodwin 



-87- 



on an even keel. Elaine Capone, our coordinator is successfully planning the trips, 
parties, and the day-to-day operations of the Center. She also coordinates the 
many volunteers who assist in the operations of the Center. Elaine continues to 
get calls from Swampscott seniors and the children of the seniors requesting 
information and help on their specific problems. All in all it has been a good year 
for the Council and the Seniors, and we look forward to many more years of 
successfully taking care of some of the needs of our seniors. 

DESIGN SELECTION COMMITTEE 

Thomas F. Kiley, Chairman 
James Harris Dino Stati 

In accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
7, Sections 38 1/2 to 38-0 incl., the Board of Selectmen has appointed a Design 
Selection Committee to ensure that the Town receives the highest quality design 
services for its public building projects; to provide for increased confidence in the 
procedures followed in the procurement of designed and design-related services 
for public building projects, and to foster effective broadbased participation in its 
public work within the design professions, and to provide safeguards for the 
maintenance of the integrity of the system of procurement of designers' services. 

Upon requests for designer services by any Town office or department, the 
Committee publishes a reguest for designer proposals for the proposed work in 
a local newspaper and in the central register, established by statute. Proposals 
are received, opened and reviewed at a public meeting. Based on experience, 
past performance, financial stability and personal qualifications, the Committee 
submits a list of three finalists to the requesting party, ranked in the Committee's 
opinion. 

Projects coming under our review during the past year were: 

1 . Asbestos inspections, training and planning 
Four applicants 

2. Energy Consultant Services 
Twelve applicants 

3. Heating Systems, Four Elementary Schools and Town Administration 
Building 

Seven applicants 

4. Blocksidge Field House Renovations 
Eight applicants 

5. Asbestos Abatement Proposals 
Five applicants 

6. High School, Little Theatre Lighting 
One applicant 

The Committee would like to single out Richard G. Coletti, Director of Plant 
and Maintenance for the Swampscott School Department and thank him for his 
invaluable assistance in the preparation and scheduling of reviews of projects for 
the School Department. 



ELECTION COMMISSIONERS 



Francis A. Mancini, Chairman 



Timothy J. Davern 



Theodore A. Patrikis 



Marguerite A. Cunningham 



The Board of Election Commissioners will sadly miss a long standing member 
in Dorothy Collins, who passed away this past early winter. She was missed this 
year for the help she had given through all the elections and her other duties with 
the Election Commission, spanning four decades. 

The position, upon the resignation of Alfred Maselbas, was filled by Theodore 
A. Patrikis who is working out very well being a great asset to the Board. Our newest 
member, Marguerite Cunningham, was appointed in September and is learning 
the ways of an election slowly, in various steps, and will work closely with the Board. 

The Election Commission has a new computer in the office, and we will 
eventually print our own poll sheets and other valuable material supplied to us 
now by an outside firm. 

The Annual Town Census was conducted during the months of January, 
February and March as per Ch. 51 Sec. 4-7, of the General Laws of Massachusetts, 
requiring a census of every town resident. This year was the first year the census 
was conducted by mail. This seemed to work very well, and we wish to thank the 
residents of the town for their cooperation. 

The total census count was 14,373 residents. The breakdown by precincts 
was as follows: 



The Annual Town Election was held on Tuesday, April 25, 1989, in accordance 
with Article 80 of the 1982 Town Warrant, wherein it was voted to Amend Article 
II of Section 1 of the General By-Laws of the town to read, the Annual Town Meeting 
shall be held on the Fourth Tuesday in April of each year. At the instruction of 
the Selectmen, the polls were open from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. to act on the 
following: 

To choose a Moderator for one (1) year 

To choose five (5) members of the Board of Selectmen for one (1) year 
To choose a Town Treasurer for three (3) years 
To choose one(l) member of the Board of Assessors for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Board of Public Works for three (3) years 
To choose two (2) members of the School Committee for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Trustees of the Public Library for three (3) 
years 

To choose one (1) member of the Board of Health for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Planning Board for five (5) years 
To choose three (3) Constables for three (3) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Housing Authority for five (5) years 
To choose one (1) member of the Commissioners of Trust Funds for three 



Precinct One 



2466 
2230 
2613 
2416 
2337 
2311 



Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 



14,373 



(3) years 



-89- 



Also: 

To answer one (1) non-binding public opinion advisory question, Yes or No 



Also: 

To choose eighteen (18) Town Meeting Members in each of the six (6) precincts 
for three (3) years 

To choose one (1) Town Meeting member in Precinct One for one (1) year 
To choose one (1) Town Meeting member in Precinct one for two (2) years 

At the close of the election the meeting adjourned to Monday, April 30, 1989, 

at 7:45 P.M. at the Jr. High School Auditorium 

The total registered voters at the close of registration on April 5, 1989 was 9476 
The total votes cast were: 4626 representing approximately 49%. The 

breakdown is as follows: 

Precinct One 753 
Two 734 
Three 656 
Four 840 
Five 824 
Six 819 

4626 



The number of absentee ballots cast was, Two Hundred and Fifty-Six (256) 



Precinct 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Total 


Moderator: 1 Year, Vote for One 
















Wm. E. Shanahan 


139 


181 


178 


167 


136 


86 


887 


Martin Goldman 


451 


319 


252 


326 


453 


563 


2364 


Robert W. Murphy 


108 


183 


176 


298 


188 


108 


1061 


Selectman: 1 Year, Vote for Five 
















James Rudolph 


347 


270 


190 


296 


430 


426 


1959 


Alice Winston 


119 


107 


113 


180 


202 


161 


882 


Peter R. Beatrice III 


267 


342 


337 


390 


373 


399 


2108 


Daniel Santanello 


307 


301 


327 


441 


378 


279 


2033 


Susan Blonder 


258 


224 


182 


247 


285 


384 


1580 


Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 


272 


340 


346 


406 


338 


291 


1993 


Robert Perry 


494 


502 


494 


546 


447 


368 


2851 


Joseph Sinatra 


166 


227 


232 


272 


195 


115 


1207 


Michael Ross 


172 


147 


102 


137 


195 


188 


941 


Town Treasurer: 3 Years, Vote for One 














Jack L. Paster 


553 


536 


495 


577 


592 


597 


3350 


Board of Assessors: 3 Years, Vote for One 












Ernest Mazola 


503 


509 


473 


581 


540 


538 


3144 


Board of Public Works: 3 Years, Vote for One 












Anthony Pasciuto 


247 


229 


258 


320 


272 


209 


1535 


Kevin Gookin 


272 


326 


255 


333 


316 


316 


1818 


School Committee: 3 Years, Vote for Two 












Eva Peretsman 


237 


206 


163 


195 


201 


133 


1135 


MaryLou B. Sherr 


294 


323 


328 


436 


409 


476 


2266 


Sharon Weaver 


188 


232 


215 


288 


231 


195 


1349 


Sandra Rotner 


444 


383 


356 


442 


503 


531 


2659 



-90- 



Precinct 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 

Trustee of Public Library: 3 Years, Vote for One 

Paul Wermuth 457 437 427 518 516 540 2895 

Board of Health: 3 Years, Vote One 

Theodore Dushan 528 526 482 593 605 610 3344 

Planning Board: 5 Years, Vote for One 

Brian Watson 425 430 400 527 491 498 2771 

Constables: 3 Years, Vote for Three 

Arline Maguire 314 334 294 397 350 346 2035 

Paul Minsky 342 253 259 336 381 400 1971 

Wm. Eldridge 342 262 342 360 310 327 1943 

Housing Authority: 5 Years, Vote for One 

Robert Donnelly 197 195 191 283 238 218 1322 

Michael Palleschi 378 384 364 372 392 388 2278 

Commissioner of Trust Funds: 3 Years, Vote for One 

Carl Reardon 442 407 409 460 459 459 2636 

Question #1 : Yes or No 

Yes 92 83 258 115 114 186 848 

No 40 56 113 55 52 71 387 

For Town Meeting Members elected, See Town Clerk's Report in this book. 

JUNE 6, 1989 - SPECIAL ELECTION 

The total number of registered voters as of the close of registration, 8938 

Precinct One 1514 

Two 1446 

Three 1456 

Four 1511 

Five 1498 

Six 1513 



8938 



The total votes cast were, 3877, representing 43% of the total registered voters, 
with a breakdown as follows: 

Precinct One 495 

Two 640 

Three 578 

Four 721 

Five 712 

Six 731 



3877 



The number of absentee ballots were 118 

A Special Town Election was held on June 6, 1989. There were two questions 
on the Ballot as follows: 

Question #1 

Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to assess an additional $963,000.00 
in Real Estate and personal property taxes for the purpose of funding expenditures 
for public schools, the police department, fire department, public works and other 



-91 - 



Town departments, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1989? 
Question #2 

Shall the Town of Swampscott be allowed to exempt from the provisions of 
Proposition 2 1 /2, so called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in 
order to fund the expenses and costs connected with the construction of sewerage 
treatment and sewerage disposal facilities and the appurtenances thereto? 

Precinct 1 2 3 4 5 6 Total 

Question #1: 

Yes 177 296 307 357 320 448 1905 

No 308 339 266 359 387 279 1938 

Question #2: 

Yes 200 314 275 369 313 393 1864 

No 280 313 298 331 382 323 1927 

NOVEMBER 7, 1989, SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

Due to the death of Selectman Thomas H. Driscoll, Sr., the remaining members 
of the Board of Selectmen received a petition from the registered voters of the 
Town for a Special Election to fill the vacancy. 

This special Election was held on November 7, 1989. 

The total number registered voters at the close of registration on October 10, 
1989 was 9131. 



The Precinct count was as follows: 




Precinct One 


1569 


Two 


1464 


Three 


1505 


Four 


1555 


Five 


1515 


Six 


1523 




9131 



The total votes cast were 3047, representing 33% of the total registered voters 
with a breakdown as follows: 

Precinct One 431 

Two 519 

Three 458 

Four 612 

Five 547 

Six 480 



3047 

The total number of Absentee Ballots cast was. eighty-eight (88). 



Precinct 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Total 


Seiectman-To fill a Vacancy 
















Chris Drucas 


72 


125 


101 


156 


152 


133 


739 


Eva Peretsman 


84 


77 


73 


110 


117 


69 


530 


Alice Winston 


12 


9 


20 


29 


39 


17 


126 


Clinton J. Guy, Jr. 


20 


18 


18 


42 


45 


15 


158 


Susan Blonder 


78 


69 


64 


77 


62 


115 


465 


Thomas H. Driscoll, Jr. 


161 


221 


182 


197 


128 


131 


1020 



-92- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



William R. Hyde, Chief 

The following is the report of the Fire Chief for the year 1989: During the year 
1989, this department answered a total of 1092 alarms. Of these alarms, 21 were 
building fires, 94 were traffic accidents, 215 were medical aids. The remainder 
of these calls included lockouts, false alarms, mutual aid runs to other cities and 
towns, electrical fires, chimney fires, oil burner fires, details and miscellaneous 
incidents. We inspected and issued 43 permits for oil burners. There were 184 
parcels of property inspected for smoke detectors. The law requires that all new 
homes be inspected for smoke detectors and also homes that are being sold. 

"APPARATUS" 

The apparatus of this department is in excellent condition and the Town is 
very fortunate in having Robert Pierro as its mechanic. Bob does an exceptional 
job in keeping the apparatus moving. He is very conscientious about his work and 
certainly this is a reflection on the department and the way the apparatus performs. 
I wish to thank Bob publicly for his dedication. 

"FIRE DRILLS AND INSPECTIONS" 

Fire drills were conducted at all schools during the year 1989. Fire drills are 
conducted shortly after school opens in September, during Fire Prevention Week 
and other times throughout the year. These drills are conducted in an orderly and 
efficient manner under the supervision of my officers. I would like to commend 
as usual the principals and faculty for their help during these drills. All fire alarm 
systems are checked in the schools by the electrical inspector and members of 
this department prior to the September opening. All systems were found to be 
in proper working condition. Fire drills were also performed in accordance with 
the law at The Jewish Rehabilitation Center for Aged, and all the building under 
the supervision of the Greater Lynn Mental Health. All mercantile, public and other 
buildings under our control have been inspected in accordance with the law. 
Inspection of property is a valuable part of the fire service, and we of the Fire Service 
are more than happy to do our part in this most important work. Citizens of 
Swampscott are urged to contact their fire department for suggestions on fire 
Prevention and fire safety. The number to call is 595-4050. 

"FIRE ALARM SYSTEM" 

The fire Alarm System is maintained by the Town Electrician Inspector. 
Overhead wiring is still needed in some parts of the town. Each year for the past 
few years, the Town Meeting has voted sums of money for the electrical inspector 
to perform the necessary work on the system as required to keep it up to code. 
I am in hopes that this program will continue in order to give the citizens the best 
possible protection. Fire alarm boxes are important and all residents should know 
the location of the fire alarm box nearest to their home. This box can be used 
to summon help immediately for any type of emergency. The fire alarm box is 
not limited to fire related incidents, but can be used to summon help for medical 
aids, automobile fires, automobile accidents and similar incidents requiring the 
fire department. Do not hesitate to use the fire alarm box if necessary. 

"PERSONNEL" 

During the Year 1989, there were three appointments to the Swampscott Fire 
Department. They were as follows: Barbara Walsh was appointed on February 
17, Graham Archer was appointed February 10, and John Quinn transferred from 
the Nahant Fire Department to Swampscott. John's father is the former fire chief 
of Nahant and brings with him several years of firefighting. Barbara and Graham 
are presently attending the Massachusetts Fire Academy and will be training there 
for seven weeks. Bruce Gordon our department clerk has been very busy setting 



-93- 



up the department's computer. He has spent many hours inputting information 
in the computer and will be training the members of the department in its use. 
Bruce devotes a tremendous amount of his own time on town business, and I feel 
it is important to recognize him at this time. Again the town is very fortunate in 
having people like Bruce Gordon. 

"RECOMMENDATIONS" 

I recommend the appointment of additional personnel to this department. 

I recommend the appointment of a Fire Prevention Officer. 

I recommend the appointment of a Deputy Chief. 

I recommend the replacing of overhead fire alarm wires as needed throughout 
the Town. 

I recommend the replacing of fire alarm boxes throughout the Town as needed. 
I recommend a program of replacing fire department vehicles on a regular 
basis. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee, Town Meeting members, all town departments and specially to the 
Officers and firefighters of my own department for their cooperation during the 
year 1989. 

FOREST WARDEN 

Chief William R. Hyde 

During the year 1989, this department issued 14 burning permits to the 
residents of Swampscott. This was done in accordance with the law which permits 
open burning during the period January 1 5 through May 1 . This burning, consists 
of open burning of products of open space land husbandry and management, 
including materials commonly referred to as brush including vegetation such as 
tree branches, brush, cane, driftwood and other forestry debris but excluding grass, 
hay or leaves. The permit for such burning is to be obtained from the Head of 
the Fire Department. 

Such burning shall be performed in accordance with the following 
requirements; a) without causing a nuisance, b) with smoke minimizing starters 
if starters are necessary, c) between the hours of ten o'clock in the morning until 
four o'clock in the afternoon, d) on land proximate to the place of generation of 
such products or at such place as may be designated in the permit. Violations 
shall be punishable by a fine of not more than fifty dollars per day, and each day's 
violation shall constitute a separate offense. 

FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE 

Buck Weaver, General Chairman 
Our 1989 Fourth of July Celebration went off successfully due to the 
tremendous efforts of many Townspeople. Nancy Carden, Connie Hayes and the 
members of the Swampscott Rotary Club deserve special recognition. Without 
their work our town festivities would be nonexistent. 

In 1989, $28,451 .25 was collected from residents and businesses. This was 
less than our projected expenses, but we were able to finish with a balance of 
$3,227.00 less any bills received after September 27, 1989. Our balance is due 
to a large donation from Athlete's Corner and the road race, plus a savings of 
approximately $2,500 in projected expenses. One band did not make the parade 
and we negotiated a reduced fee for the fireworks due to the 45 minute delay in 
the start of the aerial show. Our major expenses were the fireworks ($15,500), 
printing and postage ($2,676.50) and police coverage ($2,762.03). 



-94- 



HARBORMASTER 



Lawrence P. Bithell-Harbormaster 



Assistants 



John Cawley 
Michael Gambale 



William Guay 
William Hennessey 



Donald Peterson 



The 1989 boating season was a successful one! One hundred, seventy-eight 
individuals obtained mooring permits, the fees for which proved adequate to cover 
the Harbormaster Department's entire budget for the year. 

1989 did see a few changes within the department. Four highly qualified 
individuals, on the recommendation of the harbormaster, were appointed Assistant 
Harbormasters by the Board of Selectmen. Joining the force as assistants were 
John Cawley, Michael Gambale, William Hennessey, and Donald Peterson. William 
Guay was re-appointed Assistant Harbormaster. 

In addition to providing the normal broad range of services to the boating 
public, this year, the harbormaster trained all Swampscott firefighters in the proper 
operation of the town boat. Happily, there was no occasion for the Fire Department 
to use the boat in an emergency situation; however, had the occasion arisen, we 
were well trained in its operation. 

1989 also saw a surge in jet ski use along the Swampscott coast. New State 
regulations prohibiting use of jet skis on many lakes, ponds, and rivers forced 
owners to bring their jet skis to the ocean. Early in season, there were problems 
with many jet skiers operating dangerously among boats in the harbor and in close 
proximity to bathers at Swampscott beaches. Considerable pointed discussion 
was conducted with several jet skiers early in the season, and we are pleased 
to report that, throughout the remainder of the summer, they responded well by 
operating their craft in a safe and considerate manner. 

For the most part due to the early jet ski problems, the Harbormaster's 
Department constructed and placed designated swim area markers at Fishermen's 
Beach. These functioned very nicely, as a result of whjch, we recommend that 
designated swim area markers be placed at Whales and Eisman's Beaches next 
year. We have sought the Recreation Commission's involvement in this regard, 
and we anticipate their input and assistance. 

Hurricane Hugo tested the mettle of the men and equipment of the 
Harbormaster's Department in 1989. Hugo "brushed" us with sixty to seventy 
knot winds causing damage or destruction to some boats in Swampscott: however, 
just prior to the storm, all vessels in the harbor were checked and owners were 
notified to remedy any insecure situations. In many instances where owners could 
not be reached, the harbormaster and assistants secured vessels thus keeping 
damage to a minimum. 

The harbormaster's boat continues to serve the town well as it approaches 
its eighth season. It must be remembered however, that the boat is an emergency 
vehicle and, in the interest of reliability and safety, the eight-year-old outboard 
motor should be replaced. We seek to do this. 

Your harbormaster and several assistants are very active members of the 
Massachusetts Harbormasters Association. Through regular attendance at M.H.A. 
meetings and seminars, we are kept abreast of the latest techniques involving 
administration and enforcement of regulations concerning local waters. Our 
involvement in this fine organization has also enabled us to strengthen ties with 
harbormasters from neighboring communities, with the Massachusetts 
Environmental Police, and with the United States Coast Guard, all extending to 
mutual aid should the need arise and, in general, increasing the efficiency of the 



-95- 



department with a view toward greater service to the Swampscott boating public. 

In closing, we wish to extend appreciation to the Public Works, Police, and 
Fire Department for their considerable assistance throughout the year. We wish 
also to thank recently retired Assistant Harbormasters, particularly Mr. Carl 
Reardon, for support in years past. Finally, we wish to thank the boaters in 
Swampscott, who make boating a safe and pleasurable pastime. 

SWAMPSCOTT HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Margaret M. Kelly, Chairman 
Barbara F. Eldridge, Vice-Chairman 
Michael A. Palleschi, Treasurer 
Albert Dilisio, Member 
John F. O'Hare, Member 
Mark N. Thomas, Executive Director and Secretary 

The office of the Authority is located at 6 Duncan Terrace and is open daily 
from 8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday. Regular and Special Meetings 
are held as often as necessary to carry out the business of the Authority. The Annual 
Election of Officers is held on the third Wednesday following the Annual Town 
Election. 

The Authority was established in 1948 and is an independent corporation from 
the Town. The Authority has five Members, four are elected by the voters of the 
Town of Swampscott and the fifth member is appointed by the Secretary, Executive 
Office of Communities and Development. 

Information with regard to Admission and Continued Occupancy Limits and 
Eligibility Requirements for both types of housing in the Town can be obtained 
by calling the Authority Office at 593-5516 or calling in person during business 
hours. 

All Rules and Regulations pertaining to Public Housing are on file for inspection 
by the public. 

200-1 The Insulation and Weatherstripping for the nine buildings at Cherry 
Street and Cherry Court was started in December, 1989 and will be completed 
in early 1990. Plans are still in effect for vinyl siding. 

689-C The program at 12 Ryan Place is fully occupied and being administered 
by North Shore Association for Retarded Citizens. 

Chapter 667 & 705 The Authority is still vigorously looking for a site or sites 
to build congregate units of 667 housing, also for elderly and family housing. 

The five Commissioners, and the Executive Director of the Swampscott 
Housing Authority would like to express their appreciation to the Board of 
Selectmen and the Board of Appeals for their support and interest. 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Louis A. Gallo Edward W. Krippendorf Carl D. Reardon 

During the past year, the Commissioners met with Town Treasurer Jack L. 
Paster to review investments of various trust funds. After several options were 
presented by the Treasurer, it was agreed to continue with the current investment 

practices. 



-96- 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Robert W. Murphy, Chairman 

Theodore A. Dushan, M.D. Steven H. Lefkowitz. M.D. 

Kent F. Murphy, C.H.O., Health Officer 

Statistics show us where we have been and give us an insight into where 
we may be going. 

This year, 135 deaths were reported to the Health Department. The leading 
causes of death were: Heart problems, 63; Pulmonary-lung, 23; Cancer, 18; C.V.A., 
8; Septicemia, 6; Alzheimer, 5; Kidney-Urinary, 3; Gastrio-lntestinal, 3; Central 
Nervous System, 2; Accidental, 2; Encephalitis 1. 

There were 117 births reported this year. 

Through private funds received, a survey of students in grades 6-12 was 
conducted by the Medical Foundation of Boston. Results indicated that Swampscott 
students do not differ from students in other communities. As a result of this study, 
the Swampscott Board of Health, in cooperation with Dr. Theodore Dushan, the 
Swampscott Rotary Club, and the School Department held a successful six-week 
program for parents, teachers, nurses, social workers and alcohol counselors. The 
program called, "ADOLESCENTS JUST DON'T HAPPEN!" was attended by over 
200 people each evening. The overwhelming response is an indication that parents 
find such programs worthwhile. 

We wish to thank the many members of the Rotary Club, the School 
Department and our staff for a job well done! Plans are underway for additional 
programs. 

RESCO has been mandated to build an acid gas scrubber or close. Because 
of the many difficulties experienced in getting plans approved at the local and 
state level, the Legislature extended the deadline to install the scrubbers. Plans 
are almost complete, and we have been given three options: 1 . To bring trash 
elsewhere; 2. To sign a 15-year Contract (Five of which is an old exisiting Contract); 
or 3. To complete the term of the existing Contract. Presently, the Board is 
evaluating all options; also, the Board will review the option of a better long-term 
Contract with other members of the RESCO communities. 

As a result of the greatly increased tonage fees at RESCO, we are looking 
for ways to reduce our tonage. To this end, we have been working jointly with 
other communities, and have formed the North Shore Recycling Committee. This 
Committee has been working diligently with various recycling vendors. Also, we 
have appointed our own Recycling Committee, and will have recycling in place 
soon. 

As a result of the State shortfall in local aid, the Finance Committee requested 
that the Board of Health implement a trash fee. At this writing, the bills for the 
trash fee have been sent. Abatements of 40% are being given to senior citizens, 
a 100% abatement to the blind; and abatements are given to hardship cases and 
widows who meet the financial criteria for a State exemption. 

The Board of Health is working with the Department of Public Works on a 
regional leaf compost facility with the Town of Marblehead and the City of Salem. 
A past project with the Town of Marblehead failed because of lack of State funds. 
It is hoped this project will succeed. 

The Flu Clinic was a success again this year. The main clinic was held at 
St. John's school hall, courtesy of Monsignor John Carroll. Over 1 ,380 doses were 
distributed with 450 flu vaccinations given to persons over 50, and to those of 
medical high risk. Two additional clinics were necessary and held at the Town 
Hall with another 261 vaccinations given. Another 69 persons received flu vaccine 
at other times, bringing the total to 730 persons vaccinated in 1989. We wish to 
thank Board members and Board physician, Dr. Theodore Dushan and volunteers, 



- 97- 



Joan Freid. R.N., Joan Reagan, R.N., Phyllis Connolly, R.N., and our public health 
nurse, Joan Myers. In addition, we wish to thank the clerical staff, Barbara 
Elderidge, Jennie Dipietro, Barbara Broderice, Marion Sacco, Carol Dedrick, 
Cathleen Welch, Grace Bracclo, Betty O'Shea, Barbara Concannon and Jennie 
McVie. Their assistance enabled us to operate an efficient clinic. 

Our dental clinic, under the director of Dr. Clemens Schoenbeck, Dr. Srian 
Cousin, Dr. Andrew Hansen and Dr. Charles Lynch was held this year in Grades 
K to 6. 

Under discussion this year were two subdivisions; namely, Sculpin Way 
Extension which was approved, and the Marino subdivision. Due to a drainage 
problem, the Sacurd Way Subdivision, a/k/a Supreme Court, is still under 
discussion. 

Throughout the year, many school volunteers and school personnel were given 
the Tuberculin test. 

Dr. Arthur Barry held his Spring rabies clinic at a nominal cost of $5.00. Many 
residents took advantage of this clinic for their dogs and cats. 

Joan Myers, R.N., our public health nurse, conducted blood pressure clinics 
for the senior citizens at the Senior Center, as well as by office appointments. 

Also, blood lead tests were conducted in all public school kindergarten classes, 
as well as the seven (7) day care centers licensed by the Board of Health. 

This year, the beaches tested well with acceptable bathing standards for the 
most part of the summer. Tests at Kings Beach were high at the end of the season. 
It is the opinion of the Board of Health that when the inflow infiltration work is 
completed at the Lynn Stacey Brooks area, that much of the pollution to this beach 
will be eliminated. Again, beach testing was done jointly with the Lynn Health 
Department, and we wish to thank them for their able and professional cooperation. 

This year, our department with the Marblehead Board of Health, conducted 
a joint Food Service Training Program for employers and employees. The Program 
was conducted by Mr. Ron Hershbert of R.H.I., a retired Federal Food Service 
employee. This was very well received, and appreciated by those in attendance. 

We wish to thank the many citizens who volunteered services to our 
Department, the Swampscott Rotary Club, and other Boards and Departments 
for their cooperation during the year. 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 

DANIEL C. CAHILL 

The office of the Inspector of Wires issued 248 permits during 1989. 

During the year the process of entering permits into the computer was started. 

Permits were issued for new and old work; changes of service and installations 
for residential, commercial and municipal needs. 

Work is continuing at the Shipswatch Project on Humphrey Street and also 
at the Preston Beach Project. 

Routine and emergency calls and inspections are done on a daily basis 
throughout the year. Office hours for the inspector are 5 to 6 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday. Permits may be obtained in the Building Department office Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. until noon. 

Messages and requests for inspections are taken in the Building Department 
for the inspector, weekdays from 8:30 a.m. until noon. 



-98- 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Louis A. Gallo, Chairman 
Douglas Maitland, Secretary-Trearurer 



Sylvia B. Belkin 
David Callahan 
Nancy Cropley-Backstrom 



Marilyn Margulius 
Donald J. Warnock 
Senior Historian 



In this year's report to the townspeople, we would like first to thank Barbara 
Fulghum for her years of service on the Commission, and for the hours she gave 
toward the restoration of the Fish House. 

In the past year, the Commission processed five Site Plan Review applications 
and one subdivision as required by the Town of Swampscott Zoning Bylaws. Also, 
we answered over 200 requests for historical information from students, 
organizations and out-of-town agencies including two requests from authors of 
books on "Town Greens" and "Resort Hotels" in which the town will be included. 

We have voted to move our regular meetings to the first Tuesday of the month 
and to continue meeting at the Swampscott Public Library. 

Several members of the Commission inspected the "Old Pumping Station" 
adjacent to the town's Sewerage Treatment facility on Humphrey Street with the 
hope of saving the facility, if possible, for alternative usage. 

The Commission received notice from the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission that the Swampscott Historical Society building at 99 Paradise Road 
has been voted eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places 
(36CFR60). The nomination will be reviewed by the National Park Service in 
Washington, DC for final review. 



The Planning Board held fifteen meetings during the year ending December 31 , 
1989 to study and recommend action on various site plans, subdivision plans, 
easement plans, and a multitude of other planning and development issues. In 
addition, individual members made site visits and responded to citizen inquiries. 

In its ongoing efforts to be involved and make informed recommendations 
in the Town's interests, the Planning Board also held discussions on traffic, 
wetlands, parking, and landscaping issues. The Board continues its support for 
landbank legislation as a means to create a fund for future conservation land 
acquisition. 

The Board continued its gradual effort to improve and update the Zoning Bylaw 
and held numerous discussions regarding possible changes. With the building 
inspector, the Board constantly measured the effectiveness of the Bylaw in clearly 
defining permissable construction. 

We hope that the future will see closer cooperation and communication among 
all Town boards, individuals, and groups, as we all look for the positions and take 
the actions which best further the greater Town's interests. 




Brian T. Watson, Clerk 
Veeder C. Nellis 



Vincent R. DiLisio 
Peter Beatrice, Jr. 



-99- 



SWAMPSCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1989 was a somewhat difficult year for the library, beginning with the 
resignation of our Director, Deirdre Hanley, in March; it was not until May that 
she was replaced by Jean Marcy. In addition, Joan Howey, who held one half of 
our shared children's room position, resigned in April. During this time there were 
many budget problems in the town, culminating in the failure of an override in 
June, followed by a second set of Town Meetings. At those meetings, the library 
suffered a sharp cut in its budget, forcing a reduction in the number of hours the 
library could be open from 60 to 40 per week. During the fall and winter, therefore, 
we were open only on Monday and Thursday from 9 to 5; Tuesday from 9 to 9; 
Wednesday from 1 to 5; and Friday and Saturday from 9 to 1 . 

In addition to these shortened hours, there were cutbacks in other areas, also. 
The amount spent on books was reduced sharply; many magazines and 
newspapers were dropped; and we were unable to replace Joan Howey-thus we 
have at present only a half-time children's librarian to cover the reduced hours 
the children's room can be open. After wrestling with this difficult situation for some 
months, Mrs. Marcy resigned in October. 

But all is not gloom. We have a new director, Mr. Stephen Fulchino, who begins 
in early January. He comes to us from Medford, where he was assistant Director 
for some years. Experienced in all phases of library work, he is enthusiastic and 
knowledgeable, and we look forward to a long and fruitful relationship. 

We are very grateful for the many expressions of sympathy and support from 
the townspeople, many of whom have expressed their views to us forcefully and 
offered assistance of various kinds. Many have joined The Friends of the Library, 
which has grown in membership and is planning more programs and activities 
for this coming year. (1989, incidentally, marked the 20th anniversary of the Friends 
of the Library.) 

Surprisingly, circulation figures have remained nearly the same, though final 
figures are not in: it appears to be about 1 16,125. The amount of fines collected 
this year increased to nearly $9000, though the library does not get this money; 
it goes into the town's general fund. 

The children's room won a grant from the State Board this year for Early 
Childhood Resource Kits, which consist of sets of books that day care centers 
and nursery schools can borrow; we hope they will reach children who may not 
have access to the library. In addition, The Friends of the Library purchased some 
needed furniture for the library, for which we are grateful. 

The library has a new book return slot below one of the front windows, built 
by our custodian, Bill Desmond. This is a place to return books after hours, and 
replaces the old one that used to stand on the front sidewalk. 

Progress was made on the patio this year, with a new concrete floor, and 
brick planters erected around the edges; a handsome flagpole was also erected 
at one corner. This work is being done gratis by the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial 
Committee, and we look forward to its completion in spring, 1990. 

The cuts in our budget, incidentally, were such that the library no longer 
qualified for state aid. Nonetheless, we applied for a hardship waiver, and just 
before the year ended were notified that the State Board had granted it, so we 
will get the aid this year. This was very cheering news. 

Through all the vicissitudes of the year, the staff remained cheerful, hard- 
working, and optimistic, serving our patrons well and with good humor. We are 
also grateful to the many volunteer workers, without whom we would be hard-put 
to function as well as we do. 

Here is a quotation from the Town Report of the library in 1875, one hundred 
and fifteen years ago: 



-100- 



"Here we are building up an institution to be transmitted, we trust, to future 
generations:-an educational institution no less than our schools, which we very 
properly cherish and liberally endow. Very few of either sex leave school without 
a taste for reading: and while they acquire a business education by mingling with 
the world and "roughing it," a good library and reading-room, in connection with 
conversation, letterwriting, etc., will become their teachers, and continue the 
education begun in the primary school, on through life. Regarding the Library, 
then, as a school, and the books as silent teachers, while your Committee pledge 
themselves to strive only for the highest interests of their fellow-citizens, may we 
not confidently look for a much larger "appropriation" for the coming year? 

The Trustees of the Public Library 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY REPAIRS AT THE 
PHILLIPS BEACH FIRE STATION 

Robert A. Baker Dr. Arthur Schwartz 

Louis Frisch Fred Speranza 

Fred Ribicandria 

Fire Chief William R. Hyde - Ex-Officio 
Alan K 1 ine Ex-Officio 

During the annual Town Meeting on May 2, 1988, the Town voted to renovate 
The Phillip's Beach Fire Station. A total of $65,000 dollars was vote for this project. 
During this past year a new gas heating system was installed by Amanti Company 
of Western Avenue in Lynn. In November of this year, specifications were drawn 
up for the carpentry, electrical and plumbing. There were many people involved 
with this project who donated their time and energy to see that the town got the 
most for their money. Among those were Bill Hyde Jr., owner of the Fox Maple 
Company and son of the Fire Chief, Dan Cahill the Town Electrical inspector who 
completed the specifications on his own computer and many members of the Fire 
Department who have expertise in the field of carpentry, plumbing and electricity. 
Specifications were sent out and bids went to the lowest bidder, L & H Construction 
of Medford. The project at this point is 90% completed, and it has made an 
outstanding difference not only for the appearance of the building but also for the 
morale of the firefighters. The residents are invited to stop by and take a look at 
the renovations. 

The Fire Chief is presently looking into the painting of the apparatus floor. 
When the painting is completed, the whole first floor of the building will have been 
given a fresh new look. Many thanks are extended to the Town Meeting members 
who voted for this project, and the many people who helped out with their time 
and talents. 



- 101 - 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Robert E. Perry, Representative 

With the support of Swampscott and 100 other communities in the region, 
the Metropolitan Area Planning Council was able to continue to provide planning 
services, information and advice for regional communities during 1989. 

Through the year, MAPC concentrated on refining MetroPlan 2000, the 
regional growth plan adopted in principle by representatives at the 1989 annual 
meeting in May. The regional development framework will aid communities in 
designating potential growth areas based on the availability of infrastructure, and 
in designating areas where growth should be discouraged. 

With a regional plan, growth can be directed so that affordable housing issues 
are addressed, open space and environmentally sensitive areas are protected, 
and transportation habits that contribute to traffic congestion and air pollution are 
changed. 

At the same time, planned growth can encourage new job opportunities by 
providing incentives for growth in specific areas. In addition, with a shortage of 
funds to build new roads or maintain old ones, planned growth encourages the 
best use of limited resources. 

In fiscal year 1989, which runs from July 1, 1988 through June 30, 1989, 
Swampscott contributed $2,538 to MAPC for regional planning services. 

In addition to MetroPlan 2000 planning efforts, MAPC staff produced 
community population and employment forecasts, and updated the development 
file and vacant sites survey for eacn community. 

Some communities also took advantage of information programs, and met 
with MAPC planners to discuss the federal Transportation Improvement Program, 
trip reduction tools, curb cut controls, and impact fees. In Swampscott: 
• The board of selectmen endorsed transportation priorities established by the 
North Shore Transportation Task Force (NSTTF). MAPC staff also established 
a voluntary regional review procedure for new developments in the subregion. 

MAPC appreciates our continued support. In the coming year, we are 
encouraged to engage in MetroPlan 2000 planning activities, as well as to utilize 
the planning skills and knowledge available from MAPC staff. 



-102- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

John E. Toomey, Chief 
PERSONNEL 

On September 21 , 1989, Chief Peter J. Cassidy retired after 31 years of faithful, 
loyal service to the Police department. Chief Cassidy will be missed, and we all 
wish him good health and longevity in his retirement. 

Once again during the past year no funds were expended for training except 
the required EMT training so that we may continue to operate the ambulance within 
the Police department. 

To say that this lack of training is placing the Town at great exposure to law 
suits would be the classic example of an understatement. I urge Town Meeting 
to recognize this and provide the necessary funding to ensure adequate training 
for both the legal protection of this Town, as well as for the safety to the Police 
officers and the public they serve. 



ACTIVITY REPORT 
Shift Report Summary for 1/1/89 



Calls for Service 


6,551 





Officer Initiated Calls 


627 




CIDO Court List 


5 





INFO Information Only 


27 





SUPP Supplimental Reports 


3 





pi ion 

SUSP 


4 





TEST Test 


63 





101B Notification 


68 





101D Assist Fire Department 


27 





101E Assist Other PD 


35 





102A Complaint 


368 





102B Auto-Disabled 


30 





102C Auto-Lockout 


5 





102D Lockout-Other 


3 





102b lown utfice business 


•4 
1 





102F Transportation 


14 





102G Money Escort 


1 





102J DPW Notification 


103 





102K Service Call General/No Crime 


517 





102M Truants 


5 





103A Hazardous Condition/General 


15 





103B Fuel Spill 


1 





103C Hazardous Road Conditions 


10 





103G Snow/Ice Hazard 


1 





103J Wire Down/Power Failure 


24 





103M Road Defect 


3 





104A Property/Found 


31 





104B Property/Lost 


7 





104C Property/Returned 


5 





104E Property Damage 


9 





104F Recovered Bicycles 


27 





104G Property/Recovered 


1 





105A Barking Dog 


12 





105B Animal-Bites 


2 





105C Animal-Cruelty 


6 





105D Animal-Dead/Injured 


95 






- 103- 



105E 


Animal-Loose 


30 





106B 


Mental Illness Problem 


4 





106C 


Sudden Death/Natural Causes 


13 





106D 


Sudden Death/Investigation 


2 





106E 


Medical Aid/Illness/Ambulance 


177 





106F 


Medical Aid/Injury/Ambulance 


92 





106G 


Medical Aid/lllness/Cruiser 


28 





106H 


Medical Aid/Injury/Cruiser 


42 





1061 


Medical Aid/No Transport/Refused 


47 





106J 


Medical Aid/Private Transport 


35 





107A 


Open Door/Window 


171 





107B 


Street Lights Out 


2 





107C 


Susp. Person/Vehicle/Activity 


644 





107D 


Traffic Lights Out 


6 





107G 


Water Break 


8 





108A 


Alarm-Burg-False/Accidental 


1,624 





108B 


Alarm-Fire-False/Accidental 


174 





108C 


Alarms/DPW 


1 





108D 


Alarm Check 


2 





109 A 


Suicide Attempt 


1 





109C 


Suicide Attempt in Lockup 


1 





110A 


Civil Matter 


7 





110B 


Neighbor Dispute/Non-Criminal 


19 





110C 


Mutual Aide 


11 





1100 


Req. Officer/Gen. Assist/No Crime 


1 





111A 


Missing Person 


23 





112A 


Auto-lllegally Parked 


140 





112B 


Moped/Dirt Bike/Rec. Veh. Comp. 


2 





112D 


Abandoned Vehicle 


25 





113A 


MV A/Property Damage Under $1000 


115 





113B 


MVA/Property Damage Over $1000 


101 





113C 


MVA/PI 


39 





113E 


MVA/Pedestrian 


6 





113F 


MVA/Bicycle 


6 





113H 


MVA/Uninvestigated 


31 





1131 


Hit/Run Injury 


3 





113J 


Hit/Run Property Damage 


53 





1131 




1 





120D 


LV. Scene Prop, damage 


1 





120G 


Oper. Under the Influence 


64 





120 J 


Lie. Revoked/Suspended 


23 





120L 


Unregistered M.V. 


51 





120N 


Motor Vehicle Violation (Other) 


63 





1250 


Misc. Crime (Not Listed Here) 


3 





130A 


Arrest/Warrant (SWA PD Warrant) 


8 





130B 


Arrest/Warrant (Other PD Warrant) 


63 





130C 


Arrest/SWA. Warrant by Other PD 


15 





130D 


AWOL/Deserter Arrest 


1 





130E 


Fugitive From Justice Arrest 


2 





130F 


Protective Custody 


73 





133 A 


Possessing Alcohol/Town Property 


2 





133D 


Loitering/Disorderly 


3 





133F 


Drinking in Public 


3 





139 A 


Bomb Scare 


2 






-104- 



142B 


Utterina 


2 


o 


144A 


Dist. the Peace/Dirord. Person 


14 


o 


144B 


Fireworks Complaint 


55 


o 


144C 


Disturbance/General 


286 


o 


144D 


Loud Party 


4 





1450 


Firearm Comp. (No Assualt) 


1 


o 


146A 


Violating Restraining Order 


g 


o 


146B 


Threats/Gestures 


27 


o 


146C 


Domestic 


74 


o 


148A 


Drugs-Possession 


7 


o 


148D 


Drugs-Sale/Distrib/Manufacture 


2 





150A 


Dumping/Littering 


4 


o 


154B 


Evading Taxi Fare 


2 


o 


1560 


Fish and Game Complaints 


1 





158A 


Juvenile Runaway 


3 





160A 


Kidnapping 


1 


o 


162A 


Minor in Poss. of Liquor 


10 


o 


1620 


Liquor Violations/General 


1 


o 


164 A 


Vandalism to MV. 


85 


o 


164B 


Vandalism (Other) 


101 


o 


164C 


Vandalism to Town Property 


21 


o 


1640 


Malicious Misch. 


19 





1680 


Poss. Dangerous Weapon (No Assault) 


1 


o 


170B 


Indecent Exposure 


8 





170C 


Peeping Tom 


2 





172A 


Tele. Calls-Annoy/Threat/Obscene 


29 


o 


176A 


Trespass after Notice 


3 





200A 


Servino Court PaDers 

v?vi vii iy u ii i ui/vi o 


13 


o 


807 




1 





888 


Quick Clear/No Report Required 


50 





900C 


Fire/Single Family Dwelling 


23 


o 


901 C 


Fire/Multi-Family Dwelling 


5 


o 


904C 


Fire/Commercial Building 







905C 


Fire/Public Building 


1 


o 


906C 


Fire/Other Building 


6 


o 


907A 


Arson /Mot Veh /In Use 

#Wl WVl 1 f If IVI* f VlliMII V-/ UV/ 


2 


o 


907C 


Fire/Motor Vehicle 

1 II vf lllvlvl V vl IIVIv 


10 


o 


908C 


Fire/Other Mobile 


2 


o 


909C 


Fire/Brush-Woods-Fences-Signs Etc. 


11 





911A 


Assualt/Citizen/Simple 


4 


o 


91 2A 


Aslt./Murder/Cit/lntent 


1 





91 3A 


A&B/Citizen/Simple 


25 





913B 


A&B/Domestic/Simple 


2 


o 


91 3D 


A&B/P.O./Simple 


3 





91 4A 


A&B/Cit/Ag. Injury 


5 





914B 


A&B/Domestic/Aa Iniurv 

* » v* fc^f fc^ w III vv 1 1 w/ • II IJUI y 


4 


o 


91 5C 


ABDW/Cit/Other Weapon 


4 


o 


91 5F 


ABDW/Dom/Other WeaDon 

* \%mJl*f ft / k^vl 1 If f»l Ivl V W VUUVl 1 




o 


91 6B 


ADW/Cit/Cut. Instrument 


1 


o 


91 6C 


ADW/Cit/Other Weaoon 


1 


o 


91 6E 


ADW/Dom/Cut Instrument 

* W W f fc/vl 1 If VI 1 . II Ivll Ul 1 IVl 11 


1 


o 


91 6F 


ADW/Dom/Other Wpanon 

i\U ww/ L-/ V^l 1 If \-/ 11 Ivl ¥ V vQUvl 1 


1 


o 


920A 


B&E/D/Veh/Forced 


8 


o 


920B 


B&E/N/Veh/Forced 


37 






- 705- 



920C 


B&E/D/Trk/Forced 


2 





920D 


B&E/N/Trk/Forced 


1 





920E 


B&E/D/Vehicle/No Force 


1 





920H 


B&E/N/T ruck/No Force 


1 





921 A 


B&E/D/Attempt/Build 


4 





921 B 


B&E/Build/Forced 


3 





921 C 


B&E/D/Build/Unlawful Entry 


5 





921 D 


B&E/N/Attempt/Build 


5 





921 E 


B&E/N/Build/Force Entry 


32 





921 F 


B&E/N/Build/Unlawful Entry 


3 





921 G 


B&E/Unk/Attempt/Build 


2 





921 H 


B&E/Unk/Build/Force Entry 


2 





922A 


B&E/D/Attempt/Residence 


5 





922B 


B&E/D/Resid/Force Entry 


15 





922C 


B&E/D/Resid/Unlaw. Entry 


3 





922D 


Burg/N/Attempt 


6 





922E 


B&E/N/Residence/Forced 


23 





922F 


Burg/N/Unlaw. Entry 


9 





922L 


B&E/Unk/Resid/Attempt 


1 





922M 


B&E/Unk/Resid/Force Entry 


4 





922N 


B&E/Unk/Resid/Unlawful Entry 


4 





923B 


B&E/D/School/Force. Entry 


1 





923F 


B&E/N/School/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





924C 


B&E/D/Other/Unlaw. Entry 


1 





930A 


Lar/Pick-P/Under $50 


1 





930C 


Lar/Pick-P/$200-$400 


1 





930D 


Lar/Pick-P/$400+ 


1 





930E 


Lar/Pursesnatch/Under $50 


3 





930F 


Lar/Pu rsesnatch/$50-$200 


2 





930G 


Lar/Pursesnatch/$200-$400 


1 





930J 


Lar/Shoplift/Under $50 


16 





930K 


Lar/Shoplift/$50-$200 


26 





930L 


Lar/Shoplift/$200-$400 


7 





930M 


Lar/Shoplift/$400+ 


5 





930N 


Lar/Frm-Veh/Under $50 


6 





930O 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$50-$200 


13 





930P 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$200-$400 


8 





930Q 


Lar/Frm-Veh/$400+ 


12 





930R 


Lar/Autoparts/Under $50 


7 





930S 


Lar/Autoparts/$50-$200 


3 





930T 


Lar/Autoparts/$200-$400 


4 





930U 


Lar/Autoparts/$400 + 


5 





930V 


Stolen License Plate 


16 





9300 


Larceny & Attempts 


1 





931 B 


Lar/bike/$50-$200 


21 





931 C 


Lar/Bike/$200-$400 


29 





931 D 


Lar/Bike/$400+ 


8 





931 E 


Lar/Frm-Build/Under $50 


9 





931 F 


Lar/Frm-Build/$50-$200 


11 





931 G 


Lar/Frm-Build/$200-$400 


6 





931 H 


Lar/Frm-Bulld/$400 + 


18 





931 N 


Lar/Gas-No Pay/Under $50 


3 





931T 


Lar/Other/Under $50 


20 





931 U 


Lar/Other/$50-$200 


9 






-106- 



931V 


Lar/Other/$200-$400 


11 





931 W 


Lar/Other/$400+ 


12 





932B 


Lar/By Check/$50-$200 


1 





932C 


Lar/By Check/$200-$400 


1 





935A 


Lar/M.V./Auto 


47 





935B 


Lar/M.V. /Trucks, Buses, Etc. 


3 





935C 


Lar/M.V./Other 


6 





936A 


Stol/Rec. Local/Auto 


7 





936D 


Stol. Loc/Rec. O.T./Auto 


27 





936E 


Stol. Loc/Rec. O.T./Trk, Bus, Etc. 


1 





936F 


Stol. Loc/Rec. O.T./Other 


1 





936G 


Stol. OT/Rec. Loc./Auto 


20 





938A 


Receiving Stolen Property 


4 





9380 


Receiving Stolen Property 


1 





950A 


Rape/Adult/Force 


1 





950B 


Rape/Child/Force 


2 





960E 


Rob/Commercial/Knife 


4 





960H 


Rob/gas Sta/knife 


1 





960Q 


Rob/Bank/Gun 


1 





960T 


Rob/Misc/Knife 


1 





961 E 


Unarmed Rob/Residence 


1 





961 G 


Unarmed Rob/Misc 


1 





9990 


Mistake/Disregard Case 


2 





9999 


Case Already Entered/Mistake 


10 





* * * * 


Unidentified Class uode 


18 







Total Number of Calls Listed 


7,178* 


0** 



PARKING VIOLATIONS ISSUED 
$5 2206 
$10 2489 
$15 164 
$20 1 
$25 148 
$50 60 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

I recommend the Town purchase two patrol vehicles, one personal computer, 
protective vests (bullet proof) for use by the Police officers, equip and train the 
Police officers with modern semi-automatic pistols and install the Law Enforcement 
Satellite Training Network at the police station. 

APPRECIATION 

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Board of Selectmen, 
Sister Josette Parisi, Paula Maguire the administrative assistant to the Chief of 
Police, the School Traffic Supervisors, Eugene Nigrelli, Finance Committee liaison 
to the Police department and especially to the men and women of the Police 
department. I would also like to extend my thanks to all other Town departments 
and others who have cooperated with this department throughout the year. 



- 107- 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Daniel P. Kelly, Chairman 
David L. Phillips, Member Kevin G. Gookin, Member 

Donald G. Brewer, Superintendent 

The Department of Public Works is responsible for the following services: 

1. Maintenance and snow removal of 49 miles of roadway. 

2. Operation and maintenance of the cemetery where 111 burials took place 
and 23 foundations were installed. 

3. Operation and maintenance of sewer, water and drainage systems. 

4. Maintenance of 500 fire hydrants used by the Town Fire Department. 

5. Maintenance of all parks, playgrounds, malls and shade trees. 

6. Grounds keeping for Swampscott High School football and baseball 
games. 

7. Maintenance including rubbish removal for the Town's 10,000 feet of 
beaches. 

8. Maintenance of the Town's Fish House, pier and parking area. 

9. Engineering, contracts and construction. 

10. Complete in-house vehicle and equipment maintenance. 

Major Public Works projects included: 

1. Resurfaced the following streets: 

Greenwood Avenue 
Eastman Avenue 
Blaney Street 

2. 1,000 feet of sidewalks were repaired in various parts of Town. 

3. Closeout of the backyard of the Town's Compost Facility. 

4. Signed agreement with the Lynn Water & Sewer Commission for 
Secondary Wastewater Treatment. 

5. Completed 60% of the Town's Seawall Reconstruction Project. 

7. Installed 3,000 feet of 24' Sewer Force Main in the Lynnway. 

8. Completed leak detection program on water system saving some 300,000 
gallons of lost water each day. 

9. Began design work on Town Secondary Treatment Pump Station, Force 
Main and Inflow/Infiltration Removal. 

10. 11 new water and sewer services were installed. 8 Relayed water services. 
5 new hydrants were installed. 

11. 10,000 feet of sewer and drain lines were cleaned. 

12. Composted 350 tons of wastewater sludge. 

13. Planted 40 shade trees (8 covered by insurance recovery). 

14. Fences guardrails and signs were repaired and/or installed. 

15. Began structural study of Essex Street Bridge approach ramps. 

16. Repaired 85 areas where utility installation damaged our streets. 

1 7. Two employees obtained Class II and Class III water Operator Certification 
from the State. 

18. Rebuilt floats for the pier. 

19. Began work on Regional Leaf Compost Facility. 

The office staff has incorporated two computers into its procedures for the 
purpose of preparing all correspondence, meeting minutes, reports, etc. Mail 
merging and spread sheets have helped to make the office more efficient when 
preparing data for distribution and/or record keeping. 

In addition, the staff continues to receive and channel requests, complaints 
and suggestions so that all necessary repairs and improvements are addressed. 



-70S- 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Andrew B. Holmes, Chairman 



Marie J. Clark 
Bernard O. Bloom 
Sylvia L. Stamell 



Richard Dedrick 
Sherman Freedman 
John Hughes, Jr. 



William J. Bush, Coordinator 



In keeping with the Policy of the Recreation Commission to provide worthwhile 
leisure-time activities for all age groups in the community, we continue to improve 
the programs sponsored directly by the commission which include: parking areas, 
beaches and lifeguards, adult and youth tennis, gymnastics, teen fitness and 
conditioning, youth and adult sailing, track and field, youth and adult basketball 
and playground activities. The yearly participation in these programs continues 
to be excellent. 

This year the playground programs increased by 22% and the youth tennis 
program increased by 36%. 

At the request of the Police Department, we now provide stickers, for a fee, 
for parking at the railroad station. 

To minimize costs, we increased fees for some programs, and the total 
collected reached a high of $16,633.00 during the past fiscal year. 

Schedules were changed this year for Parks and Fields as we adapt to 
changing needs of current groups. 

The Finance Committee and Town Meeting Members support of Recreation 
Commission sponsored acticles meant Jackson Park basketball court and Phillips 
Park tennis courts were completely rebuilt and restorted to tip-top condition. 

The Recreation Commission this year had Rules and Regulations drawn up 
and approved by the Board of Selectmen charging the Commission to the control, 
development, management, operation and maintenance of Public Parks and 
recreation facilities in Swampscott. 

The Commission wishes to thank the Board of Public Works, the Department 
of Public Works and their staff for the maintenance of equipment; and the 
Commission also wishes to thank the School Administration for the use of school 
facilities and the personnel needed to conduct our programs. 



-109- 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Arthur J. Palleschi, Esquire 

I am pleased to once again present to the citizens of Swampscott, the Annual 
Report of the Town Counsel. 

As in the past several years, a great deal of Town Counsel's efforts have been 
devoted to matters involving the Appeals Board and Planning Board, including 
the trial of a large number of these cases in the Superior Court and Land Court. 

The budget crisis has touched the Town Counsel's office as it has all other 
Town Departments. 

The Town Counsel has been called upon by many boards and department 
heads to assist in combating the revenue short fall problem. 

During the year, much was needed to be done relative to the issue of 
"secondary sewage" and much was accomplished; the Town Counsel having been 
part of the team that worked out the details of the solution. 

Lastly, there has been a significant increase in the number and complexity 
of workmen's compensation cases filed during the year. All workmen's 
compensation matters are the responsibility of Town Counsel. 

This year over two hundred workmen's compensation claims were processed 
and over twelve trials involving workmen's compensation claims were tried to 
conclusion. 

I should like to express my gratitude to the members of the Board of 
Selectmen, four-fifths of whom were newly elected, for the faith and trust that they 
have placed in me and for their constant cooperation. 

I believe that the office of the Town Counsel has enjoyed a good and successful 
year; however, the sudden passing of my dear friend and twenty-year colleague, 
Attorney Thomas Driscoll, was such an enormous tradegy that any successes were 
difficult to appreciate. 

As a further personal note, I have and will forever, miss Tom. 

REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PLANNING 
COMMITTEE 

Christine Alexander, Chairperson 
Barbara J. Powers, Secretary/Treasurer 
Sandra Rotner John Senk 

Joanne Wennik Francis York 

The Nahant and Swampscott Regional School Planning Board worked from 
its formation in the Fall of 1987, until June of 1989, when its feasibility report 
developed by John A. Calabro, Ph.D. & Associates was delivered to the State. 

Also, a detailed report and Proposed Agreement was presented in last year's 
Town report. At that time, the Committee recognized potential benefits of 
regionalization, yet had further work to do regarding financial and other aspects 
of the Proposed Agreement before a final recommendation could be made. 

In light of the severe nature of the present and seemingly on-going financial 
crisis in the Commonwealth, it is the consensus of the Committee, that the time 
is not right to initiate a new program or to expend further funds on the project 
at this time. 

The Committee respectfully hopes that the reports and work done on the 
project will be of use for future reference. 



- no - 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
AND THE 
SWAMPSCOTT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
DECEMBER 31, 1989 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the members of the Swampscott School Committee and the citizens of 
Swampscott. 

It is both my pleasure and my responsibility as the Chief Executive Officer 
of the school system and Secretary to the Swampscott School Committee to present 
the 1989 Annual Report. This document, an annual "State of the School System" 
compilation of selected events and activities, reflects an undiminished commitment 
of all staff within the school system to the continuous pursuit of designing and 
delivering quality instructional programs. However, as we continue to be affected 
by inadequate funding we may well be witnessing the dismantling rather than the 
building of a school system which has a long and proud heritage of excellence. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
1989 

Henry S. Dembowski, Chairperson 42 Beach Bluff Avenue 

Sandra Rotner, Vice Chairperson 21 Gale Road 

Richard R. Feinberg 12 Bradlee Avenue 

Robert L. Ingram 33 Magnolia Road 

Dr. Mary-Lou B. Sherr 39 Blaney Street 

Regular meetings, second and fourth Tuesday of each month. 
Public is welcome 

Richard K. Chrystal, Ed.D., Superintendent of Schools 596-8800 
Jacqueline Blanchard, Director of Business 

and Personnel Administration 596-8802 

Richard Coletti, Director of Plant and Maintenance 596-8802 

Deborah Norling, Director of Pupil Personnel Services 596-8805 

The Office of the Superintendent of Schools, located at Swampscott High 
School, 207 Forest Avenue, is open every weekday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

School Principals 

Peter B. Sack High School 596-8830 

Ronald Landman Junior High School 596-8820 

Richard Baker Clarke School 596-8812 

Margaret A. Griffin Hadley School 596-8847 

Sheridan Matthiesen Machon School 596-8835 

Martha Cesarz Stanley School 596-8837 

The Philosophy of the Swampscott Public Schools 

The public school is one of the most important forces in the United States 
devoted to the total development of human potential. An efficient and effective 
learning program involving the transmission and utilization of knowledge, skills, 



and attitudes will enable students to develop to their full potential as individuals 
and to make useful contributions as members of society. 

To accept a realistic evaluation of themselves, their ambitions, and their 
environment, students are encouraged and directed to study and research 
independently, to think logically, and to communicate ideas meaningfully. Students 
are guided in their interpretation of the modern world by an appreciation of their 
democratic heritage so they may be discerning in their choice of competent 
leadership and become intelligent participants in their communities and vocations. 
Moral, ethical, and aesthetic values are exemplified as indispensable guides to 
richer and more rewarding living. Fundamental to this process is the conviction 
that every student must be regarded as an individual worthy of each educator's 
sincere interest, respect, and best efforts. 

PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES TO ATTAIN SYSTEM OBJECTIVES 

• A required program of study and school-directed experiences for all students, 
developed through school and community participation, which emphasizes the 
fundamental and broader aspects of a sound education. 

• The provision of varying levels of challenge in basic subject fields to encourage 
students to be motivated to work successfully at their levels of ability. 

• A flexible curriculum from kindergarten through grade 12 which will provide 
students with a sound education, based upon recognition of their individual 
abilities, needs, and goals. 

• A guidance program for all students at all levels which, through counseling 
and testing, helps students adjust to their environment, develop their potentials, 
and utilize their interests and abilities to meet personal needs and goals; efforts 
to help students adjust to physical, emotional, or social problems, to take career 
considerations into account at the appropriate levels, and to select programs 
of studies and activities which will lead to the ultimate realization of career 
choices. 

• The preparation, development, and encouragement of all students to become 
independent, self-directed learners participating in independent study and 
research and, utilizing all communications media; emphasis on stimulation and 
guidance of self-paced learning which will lead to the emergence of individual 
citizens capable of thinking critically, making sound judgments, and becoming 
productive and effective members of a democratic society. 

• A program of enriching experiences, both cocurricular and extracurricular, to 
help students with personal, physical, mental, and social development, as well 
as to guide them in the wise use of leisure time. 

Since the school reflects the needs, values, strengths, and aspirations of the 
community, it follows that the school and the home should work together to further 
develop those personal characteristics which will lead to a better individual and 
community life for all its citizens. Therefore, a continuing dialogue among 
community, home, and school should be maintained to the end that all of the 
children of all of the people will be given the opportunity to develop, thoughtfully 
assess, and appropriately adjust to the needs of a changing society. 

STAFF CHANGES 

Listed below are personnel changes that occurred during the year 1989. As 
was done last year, the Department of Pupil Personnel Services will be included 
as a separate entity within the organizational scheme. This approach will provide 
easy reference when seeking information reflecting shifts in personnel from one 
school to another. As in the past changes in personnel according to school 
assignment will be noted. 

To those members of the staff who have joined the Swampscott "family," a 



- 112- 



warm welcome. We look forward to a long and mutually enjoyable collegial 
relationship. To those who have left the system by way of either retirement or 
resignation we extend our sincere thanks for their contribution to the youth of 
Swampscott and wish them well in their future endeavors. 

Central Office 

New Appointment(s): 

Jacqueline Blanchard, Director of Business and Personnel Administration 
Resignation(s): 

Leighton O'Connor, Administrative Assistant for Business 

Frances Snow, Secretary to the Superintendent 
High School 
New Appointment(s): 

Carla Guarnieri, Assistant Principal 
Resignation(s): 

Karen Baker, Assistant Principal 
Retirement(s): 

Richard Penn, Social Studies 

Dorothy Winer, English 
Non-reappointment(s): (Reduction in staff due to budgetary limitations) 

Robert Gerardi, Industrial Arts 

Peter Kastner, English 

Daniel Ketcham, Mathematics 

Barbara Tillman Ruh, Mathematics 

Linda Portnoy, Practical Arts 
Leave(s) of Absence: 

Christopher Ratley, Science (Second Year) 
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
New Appointment(s): 

Ronald Landman, Principal 

John Squires, Assistant Principal 
Resignation(s): 

Michael Connolly, Jr., Principal 
Leave(s) of Absence: 

Nilgun Akdag, Mathematics (Second Year) 
CLARKE SCHOOL 
New Appointment(s): 

Anne Bowen, Kindergarten Aide 

Deborah Gallant, Extended Program Coordinator 

Anne Hannaher, Pre-School Aide 

Kathleen Holohan, After-School Program Aide 

Sheila Leahy, Assistant to the Principal 

Roberta McGowan, Associate Teacher 

Marilyn Levine, Occupational Therapist 

Patricia Robbins, Instructional Aide 
Retirement(s): 

Bernice Chaletzsky, Reading 

Joan DiMeno, Kindergarten 
Transfer(s): 

Deborah Gallant, Kindergarten (from Stanley) 

Francine Goldstein, Reading (from Hadley) 
HADLEY SCHOOL 
New Appointment(s): 

Margaret Griffin, Principal 



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Margaret DeCamp, Librarian (elementary) 
Retirement(s): 

Leon Marden, Jr. Principal 
Transfer(s): 

Mary Clain, Kindergarten (from Machon) 

Lee Dineen, Aide (from Clarke) 

Janet Rushton, Intermediate (from High School) 
Leave(s) of Absence: 

Janet Frasca, Librarian 

Patricia Nagle, Primary (second year) 
MACHON SCHOOL 
New Appointment(s): 

Brenda Cassidy, Kindergarten 

Florence DiPietro, Chapter I Aide 

Francine Goldstein, Reading 

Sheridan Matthiesen, Principal 

Anne Misoda, Chapter I Tutor 

Claire Prout, Chapter I Tutor 

Arlene Rosen, Kindergarten 
Resignation(s): 

Anne Misoda, Chapter I Tutor 
STANLEY SCHOOL 
New Appointment(s): 

Martha Cesarz, Principal 
Retirement(s): 

Norry J. Lessard, Principal 
Transfer(s): 

Anne Gaffney, Intermediate (from High School) 
Germaine McManus, Primary (from Hadley) 

SUBJECT SPECIALISTS 

New Appointment(s): 

Jean Ann Massad, Trainer 
Katherine Shi nay, Athletic Trainer 

Resignation(s): 

Julie Monsein, Instrumental 

Leave(s) of Absence: 

Cynthia Coffin, Art (Second Year) 

SUPPORT STAFF (Clerical, Custodial, Maintenance) 

New Appointment(s): 

Joseph Belleville, Custodian (High School) 
Gary Chiaradonna, Van Driver (System) 
Charles DiChirico, Custodian (High School) 
Eugene Haskell, Custodian (High School) 
Terry Karavedas, Part-time Custodian (Hadley) 
Kathleen Leonard, Secretary (Clarke) 
Leroy Millett, Part-time Custodian (High School) 
Ronald Mitchell, Part-time Custodian (Hadley) 
Hugh Shultz, Custodian (High School) 

Resignation(s): 

Joseph Belleville, Custodian (High School) 
Charles DiChirico, Custodian (High School) 
Terry Karavedas, Part-time Custodian (Hadley) 

Retirement(s): 

Jean Collins, Secretary (High School) 



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James Tracey, Custodian (High School) 
PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

New Appointment(s): 

Kathleen Canavan, Special Education Aide (Junior High) 

Mark Erharctic, Learning Center Teacher (High School) 

Suzanne Feely, Special Education Aide (Clarke) 

Lin Grady, Resource Room Teacher (High School) 

Merry Oberor, E.S.L. Tutor (System-Wide) 

Antoinette Peraino, Speech Pathologist (System-Wide) 

Viviane Romine, E.S.L. Tutor (K-12) 
Resignation(s): 

Ann Hannaher, Special Education Aide (Clarke) 

Merry Oberer, E.S.L. Tutor (System-Wide) 

Susannah Vazehgoo, E.S.L. Tutor (System-Wide) 
Leave(s) of Absence: 

Cindy Miller Katz, Speech Pathologist (First Year) 
Transfer(s): 

Susan Abelson, Guidance (from High School to elementary) 

On July 24, 1989 I presented to the School Committee my vision of what our 
students will require in the way of knowledge and skills to meet the challenge of 
the 21st century. The text of my presentation, entitled PROJECT BESST follows: 

I stated that several decades ago Ralph Tyler asked four fundamental questions 
concerning curriculum and instruction. They were: 

1. What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? 

2. What educational experiences can be provided that are likely to attain these 
purposes? 

3. How can these educational experiences be effectively organized? 

4. How can we determine whether these purposes are being attained? 

Regardless of how difficult times may be and these are, as you know, not the 
most fortuitous times for public school education, we must continue to answer these 
questions. 

Even though we find ourselves in a constrictive fiscal situation, as educators 
and concerned citizens, we must still be concerned with the children who are 
entrusted to our care. It is a matter of conscience that we be anticipatory in our 
thinking. This can only be done if we scan the environment and gather and analyze 
the data which is all about us. 

Today we note ten major trends. They include the changing work force, the 
technological environment, globalization, the changing family, the age of 
convenience, educators of tomorrow, changes in school leadership, the changing 
nature of who we are, the increasing popularity of alternatives, and an increase 
in the kind of ethical and value questions being posed. 

These trends will have major impact on our curriculum and its delivery. A few 
of the effects of these trends include the following: Our labor force will be more 
highly educated than ever. Interpersonal skills will be more important. Information 
workers will need higher level thinking skills. Technological literacy will be necessary 
for all students. Students will have to be equipped with transferrable skills. Adult 
retraining programs will proliferate. It will become more difficult for educators to 
remain current in their field. Voice activation will require new speaking skills. The 
amount of handwriting and keyboarding in our schools will change. Teaching 
techniques will be reshaped. Computers will play a more active role in drill and 
practice. The number of foreign languages will expand to include Russian, Chinese, 
Japanese, and Arabic. The curriculum will focus on global issues. Interdisciplinary 
programs will expand. Family Life Education will grow. Current definition of 



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homework will change. Extended day programs will be introduced. Schools will 
consider a new time cycle. School schedules will change. The current model of 
after-school activities will be restructured. Educator accountability will be demanded 
by parents. The management of classroom time will be altered. Career ladder 
concepts will gain in popularity. Traditional labor organizations will change. Our 
delivery of English as a Second Language will be altered. We will need to meet 
the needs of an ever culturally divergent student body. The elderly will demand 
a significantly larger proportion of society's resources. We will need to reexamine 
our curriculum offerings in light of competition from a voucher system. We will begin 
to seriously question the school's obligation in teaching conflicting values and 
ethics; if it is to be done, and if so, how should it be done. 

Recognizing that these trends are powerful, and that each is linked to another, 
it is necessary that a System View be taken by educational leaders. Considering 
all of these forces, I am proposing that we begin to think in terms of a Project 
BESST, Building Excellent Swampscott Schools Together. Fundamentally, it is an 
acronym that speaks to the literature on What an Effective School Is. 

I am proposing that we undertake a 3 - 5 year plan in which system goals 
are clearly stated; each principal assumes a strong leadership position; that we 
work with all staff in order that there be a sense of ownership and dedication on 
the part of each individual working within the school system; that high expectations 
be identified and maintained; that we monitor student progress; that through early 
identification of students who may have a problem we prevent any drop out; that 
a positive learning climate be established; that time on task be increased, i.e. that 
we undertake an analysis of the amount of time spent outside of the classroom; 
that there be curriculum revision with one subject being updated each year; that 
we focus on multicultural education; increase vertical and horizontal communication 
and strive to increase parent-community involvement. 

Two years ago I presented the Swampscott Learning System. At that time I 
identified eleven components of an effective learning system. They are: 

The Mission Statement 

Goals 

A Rationale 

Comprehensive Concepts 
Performance Objectives 

Diagnostic Procedures and Evaluative Techniques 
Learning Activities 
Models of Teaching 
Multi-Media 

Classroom Management 
Learning Environment 

Our Mission Statement in Swampscott is the development of individuals who 
are maximally competent and self-fulfilling individuals as citizens, as workers, in 
a world that is maximally effective for all. With this mission statement we know 
what the curriculum is supposed to do. Our mission is enunciated in the behavioral 
projections. 

In September I will be directing the principals to undertake a needs assessment 
in each school. This is a new strategy. I will be doing this for the purpose of 
engaging in strategic planning in order that we may respond to the trends that 
are upon us. This will require that each principal present to me a five year 
educational plan which will be an outcome of the priority goals we establish and 
which they must carry out in each school. Basically, it is a piece of a Management 
System. It is an educational plan by way of a systems approach. We will be 
planning for academic achievement, change in school climate, and strong two- 



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way communication. 

I will move to implement a management by objectives process K-12 and that 
there be specification of objectives, both performance and process. Some specific 
objectives of the Superintendent of Schools for the School Year 1989-1990 are 
as follows: 

Establish an Instructional Planning Team 

Revise the Mathematics Curriculum - K - 8 

Revise the Science Curriculum - K - 8 

Revise the Computer Curriculum - K - 8 

Develop and implement a series of staff development programs 

Implement an individual school management system 
(Expansion of the School Improvement Councils) 

Create a School Climate Instrument in order to provide 
students and parents an opportunity to give us their opinion of the system and 
to assist us in a validation of our efforts. 

Another major objective will be to request approval of the School Committee 
to undertake a study for the assignment of the sixth grade to the junior high school 
and the transformation of the junior high school to a middle school. (Elimination 
of levelling - teaming, block scheduling, intramural programs, exploratory activities, 
teacher as counselor, etc.) 

It is my desire that the hallmark of my superintendency for the next three years 
will be increased community involvement, greater participatory decision 
making, a more personalized self-learning environment, and increased staff 
development activities in order that we may see Project BESST brought to 
fulfillment. 

The factors associated with effective teaching call for a high level of collegiality 
and a drive toward individual professional improvement. I will do all I can to 
accomplish both those goals. 

This will require evaluation and supervision of all personnel, but it must be 
evaluation and supervision with faith and trust in staff and a tolerance and 
enthusiasm for divergent school programs. These, in capsule form, are some of 
the goals and objectives for the next 3 - 5 years. 

They are only briefly sketched and will require a fleshing out and greater 
specificity. Though some may claim that this is not the best time to undertake 
any venture, I respond by saying that today is the first day of the rest of our lives. 
I for one want to color my world with hope - there is no such time as the best time- 
THIS IS THE TIME. TODAY IS TOMORROW! 

HIGHLIGHTS 

Major efforts undertaken by central office administration and/or school 
principals, collectively referred to as the Superintendency Team, included: 
1 . The Superintendent of Schools continued in his efforts to foster curriculum 
development and to improve the quality of instructional services. The 
retirement of two senior elementary school principals provided an 
opportunity to seek individuals who would not only assume responsibility 
as school principals but in addition would provide leadership as directors 
of learning. Thus the "new" Elementary School Principals/Directors of 
Learning were assigned the following major responsibilities: 

Clarke School - Richard Baker - Physical Education, Health and 
Athletics K-12 and Supervision of the Extended Day Program 

Hadley School - Ms. Margaret Griffin - Language Arts and Reading 
Machon School - Mrs. Sheridan Matthiesen - Computer Literacy and 
Mathematics. 



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Stanley School - Mrs. Martha Cesarz - Science Curriculum and Staff 
Development 

These four individuals are also responsible for a myriad of other tasks. 

2. The Office of the Superintendent of Schools, which includes the Director 
of Business and Personnel Administration, the Director of Pupil Personnel 
Services, the Director of Plant and Maintenance, and five clerical staff 
were relocated from the third floor of the Hadley Elementary School to 
the ground floor of Swampscott High School. The move was made in order 
that the school system be in compliance with federal law that such offices 
are to be accessible to the physically handicapped. The availability of 
"new space" at the Hadley School permitted the creation of a science 
"Discovery Room" servicing the students of Hadley. 

3. On November 21 , 1 989, the first meeting of the newly established Town- 
Wide Parent Teacher Organization convened. Though in its seminal stage 
the purpose of the committee is to increase the flow of information within 
the school system and throughout the community. Furthermore, it is hoped 
that this vehicle will lead to greater involvement in the participatory 
decision-making process on the part of all parents. 

4. An orientation and professional growth program for substitute teachers 
was conducted on November 14, 1989 in the Jennie M. McVey Memorial 
Library. The program, designed primarily by Mr. Peter Sack, Principal 
of Swampscott High School, and Mr. Richard Baker, Principal of the 
Clarke Elementary School, provided an opportunity for the administrative 
team to share with substitute teachers a working knowledge of the 
philosophy, goals, and procedures of the Swampscott School System. 
The booklet entitled The Substitute Teacher, authored by Dr. Chrystal, 
will be distributed to all substitute teachers employed by the school system 
in order that instructional services can be coordinated and articulated 
to the best of our ability. 

5. The Superintendent of Schools charged Mr. Peter Sack, Principal of 
Swampscott High School, to investigate the advisability and feasibility 
of establishing a Local Education Foundation (LEF) in Swampscott for 
the purpose of soliciting, collecting, and disbursing funds as a supplement 
to the school system budget. Mr. Sack researched LEF's on both the 
national and state level. These foundations are established for the specific 
purpose of raising money for individual public school districts and as such 
are separate legal entities from school districts. They are governed by 
a Board of Directors. A foundation composed of 26 members with Mr. 
Richard Bane as president was created. The steps taken to create the 
foundation included the size of the Board, selection of a name (The 
Swampscott United Community Coalition for Enhancement of the 
Swampscott Schools, Inc. SUCCESS), drafting the Articles of 
Incorporation and Bylaws, and drafting a General Statement of purpose. 
The foundation was officially launched when Mr. Bane, President, Mrs. 
Barbara Dusseault, Vice President, and Mr. Sack made a presentation 
to the Swampscott Rotary Club relative to its purpose. It is anticipated 
that major fund raising efforts will be undertaken to ensure the success 
of SUCCESS. Mr. Sack is to be complimented in the most laudatory of 
terms for his bringing to fruition SUCCESS. Without his dedication and 
commitment the foundation would not exist. 

6. The "Keys to Excellence" program, designed to enhance the self-image 
and self-esteem of early adolescents was implemented at the junior high 
school. Mr. Richard Baker, Director of Physical Education, Health, and 
Athletics, introduced the program, with funds available from the 



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Governor's Alliance Against Drugs. Mr. Dave Powers, a teacher at the 
junior high school, was given responsibility for implementing "Keys." All 
eighth-grade students have participated in the program and it has had 
a very positive affect on all participants. Dr. Roy Kuhn, the developer of 
the program, visited Swampscott and provided an in-service workshop 
for all staff members involved. 
7. Under the direction of Mr. Michael Connolly, Principal of Swampscott 
Junior High School, a Social Studies Curriculum Committee was 
established for the purpose of modifying/revising the Social Studies 
Program of Studies for grades 7-12. Funded by the school system and 
with primary leadership provided by Mrs. Susan LaPeer and Mr. Sanders 
Stephen, high school social studies teachers, the committee submitted 
several recommendations which included: the entire eighth grade will 
study the period of U.S. History from 1607 to 1900 commencing 
September, 1989; release time be provided for coordination of curriculum; 
and a social studies staff member be designated as coordinator with 
sufficient time to monitor the Social Studies Curriculum. The 
recommendation concerning the eighth grade was approved by the School 
Committee. The remaining recommendations remain under advisement 
since they require funding and funds were not available. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The Pupil Personnel Services Department continues to provide system-wide 
ancillary and support services to the students of Swampscott in the areas of Special 
Education, English as a Second Language, Guidance and Counseling, Health 
Services, and Testing. 

Special Education 

The goals of special education are to maximize the academic potential of 
students identified as having special needs in the least restrictive environment. 
There is a powerful initiative across the state and country to provide more services 
in the least restrictive environment or mainstream. This is accomplished by utilizing 
a number of resources and programs. Each building contains a resource room 
designed to meet the mild to moderate special needs of children. The resource 
room teachers provide direct support to individual students in addition to providing 
consultation to the classroom teachers. 

A learning center is available at each level - primary, intermediate, junior high, 
and senior high - to meet the more substantial special needs of students at those 
levels. The learning center at the high school level is a new program created to 
meet the academic, social-emotional, and/or behavioral needs of adolescents and 
young adults who would not or did not meet success in the traditional high school 
setting. 

A special needs preschool serving young children with substantial special 
needs is located at the Clarke School. An Early Childhood Allocation Grant has 
provided the funding to further our mainstreaming efforts with youngsters in the 
preschool and within our kindergarten programs. The funding will allow the 
preschool to adopt a "reverse mainstreaming" model whereby the children with 
special needs will be taught alongside children without special needs. 

A number of therapies are also available to allow special needs children to 
benefit from their educational program. These therapies include but are not limited 
to: speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, vision therapy, and 
audition support. The special education department has two speech pathologists 
to provide therapy at the elementary level. Speech therapy at the junior high and 
senior high levels are contracted. Occupational and physical therapy services are 



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contracted through Pediatric Rehabilitation Services. Vision and audition therapy 
services are contracted through the North Shore Special Education Consortium. 

The North Shore Special Education Consortium is a collaborative effort among 
seven north shore communities to combine efforts and resources to provide special 
education to children with low-incidence handicapping conditions. The Consortium 
currently rents one room at the Hadley School to provide a class for 
developmentally disabled young children. The Hadley School is taking great strides 
in mainstreaming two of the youngsters into the general school program in areas 
such as homeroom, story time, art, music, etc. 

The special education population within the Swampscott Public Schools 
remains at approximately 16% which is also the state and regional average. 

Specific activities within the Special Education Department this past year have 
included the proactive work of the Swampscott Special Education Advisory Board 
or Swampscott SEABoard. A newsletter outlining special education issues, 
concerns, and interests was published and distributed in September. The 
newsletter will be published three times a year - in the fall, winter, and spring. 
The SEABoard should be credited for writing a Commonwealth Inservice Institute 
Grant called Project Bridge. The funds will be used to support teacher and parent 
workshops addressing such issues as mainstreaming, learning styles, and 
classroom modifications for special needs children. Monthly meetings, often 
including guest speakers, are held in the high school library. These meetings are 
becoming better attended and the membership of the SEABoard has tripled over 
the previous year. 

All special education teachers are receiving intensive training in a very specific 
reading approach designed to address the needs of the severely reading disabled 
or dyslexic children. Additionally, all members of the special education department 
have been working to streamline the special education referral and evaluation 

process. 

English as a Second Language 

With the advent of Perestroika and Glastnost in the Soviet Union, Swampscott 
has been welcoming an increasing number of Russian immigrants into our nation, 
community, and schools. In addition, we have served students from a number 
of other nations including Pakistan, Mexico, Czeckoslovakia, Bolivia, and Vietnam 
to name a few. State and federal laws require that children with limited English 
proficiency be provided with appropriate English language instruction and native 
language support. Students with limited English proficiency can be found at each 
school. The system wide total of 23 students requires intensive tutoring. 

Guidance and Counseling 

The guidance department, under the direction of Mr. John McDevitt, Director 
of Guidance, has been realigned to a limited degree to allow for greater counseling 
services at the elementary level. The two larger elementary schools have 
counselors available three days per week while the smaller elementary schools 
have counselors two days each week. The junior high school is staffed with one 
full-time counselor and the high school has three full-time counselors. Under the 
supervision of the junior high guidance counselor, our seventh and eighth graders 
have had the good fortune to have a guidance counselor intern available for the 
fall semester. 

The guidance department continues to provide direction to students in realizing 
and understanding their abilities, aptitudes, interests, and needs. School 
adjustment and socialemotional support is also provided. Small group and 
individual counseling is offered to students. Additional services include home- 
school communication and support, referral service information, teacher support, 
and crisis intervention. 



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The "Summer Counseling Program" is an annual event and continues to be 
one of the most successful programs within the guidance department. Parents 
of the incoming senior class are invited to meet with the guidance director to review 
their children's prospects after graduation. Swampscott hosted the annual "College 
Fair" which attracted upwards of 2500 parents and students from Swampscott 
and the neighboring towns of Lynn and Marblehead. Career days have been held 
at the high school addressing such topics as "The Medical Field" and "Careers 
for Women in Math and Science." A mini career day was held at the junior high 
school. A Horace Mann Grant was awarded to Ms. Judith Pressler, a high school 
counselor, for a program in dropout prevention. 

Testing 

State-mandated Basic Skills tests are administered every year to all children 
in grades 3, 6, and 9. This testing program assesses the extent to which our 
students have mastered the basic skills in the areas of reading, writing, and math. 
Another state-mandated testing program is the Curriculum Assessment Test which 
purports to assess the quality of curriculum, not student achievement. These tests 
are administered every other year to students in grades 4, 8, and 12. 

Historically, the school system has administered formal achievement tests 
to all students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Currently, the Comprehensive 
Test of Basic Skills is the measure of achievement used in Swampscott. After much 
discussion, this form of testing was eliminated at the kindergarten level for two 
reasons: 1) the test did not measure what was being taught in kindergarten and 
2) the testing situation created unnecessary and excessive stress and anxiety for 
our kindergarten children. With all the discussion of public school children being 
overtested, the entire testing program will be reviewed to determine the necessity 
of testing in all grades indicated. 

Health Services 

Comprehensive school health services and emergency care are provided to 
students and members of the staff by two full-time registered nurses. One nurse 
divides her time between the four elementary schools while the other services 
the junior high and high schools. 

As health care professionals, the school nurses are responsible for providing 
direct health and medical care to the students, keeping accurate health records, 
and overseeing screening clinics. Screening clinics are conducted annually for 
vision, hearing, blood pressure, scoliosis, and lead poisoning. Nurses further 
conduct immunization clinics, dental clinics, and assist with physical exams for 
all students participating in sports. In addition, the school nurse is also a 
participating member of the Special Education Evaluation Team, consulting with 
members of the faculty, parents and students. Each school nurse conducts home 
assessments providing developmental and medical information that is relevant 
to the students' educational performance. 

The school employs a part-time nurse who conducts the vision and hearing 
screening for all students throughout the system and provides appropriate follow- 
up services as indicated. 

THE CLARKE, HADLEY, MACHON AND 

STANLEY ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

The school year 1988-1989 witnessed the involvement of students and staff 
in a wide variety of student learning activities and professional growth programs. 
Furthermore, in the instructional domain several curriculum efforts were 
inaugurated. A representative sampling of these activities and efforts follow: 
• The former Office of the Superintendent of Schools was transformed to the 



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Hadley Discovery Room, a learning environment replete with sharks, dinosaurs, 
and the soaring imaginations of students. Modeled after the Boston Museum 
of Science Discovery Room, it is the brainstorm of Hadley School teachers 
Ms. Gail Anderson, Ms. Barbara Dee, and Ms. Peg Holloran. The 'space' 
provides all students the opportunity to see the mysteries of the natural and 
physical sciences. The School Improvement Council has provided funding to 
support the instructional program. A long time 'a borning,' the staff plans even 
more fun and fascination for the students. Classroom exhibits will change 
approximately every six weeks. There has been discussion concerning the 
construction of a weather station as well as a series of "Discovery Nights" 
for parents. 

• The Humanities was well represented by a series of programs offered by Stanley 
students at all grades. Grade One presented a Memorial Day Program; Grade 
Two "The First Thanksgiving;" Grade Three, "History of Space and Aviation, 
Sort of;" Grade Four, "Lost Pot of Gold;" and Grade Five, their annual talent 
show, "From George to George." 

• Mrs. Martha Cesarz, when appointed to the position of Principal/Director of 
Learning of the Stanley School, assumed as one of her major objectives the 
development of a comprehensive inquiry-based science curriculum for grades 
1 - 6. In developing a plan of action to achieve her objective she will establish 
a network for teacher sharing, using funding from a Title II Grant written 
collaboratively with Dr. Rhoda Amaria of Salem State College. The focus of 
this effort will be classroom teachers working together to develop a series of 
classroom kits for class utilization. One outcome, hopefully, will be high school 
students serving as tutors and mentors for students in the elementary schools. 

• A Clarke School Leaders Program began with sixth graders as Leaders, grade 
five students as Cadet Leaders, and those students of grade four as Leaders- 
In-Training. Their responsibilities included an Early Morning Program so that 
parents were able to bring their children to the school between 7:30 and 8:15 
a.m., manage a Clarke School Store which provided young entrepreneurs 
with the opportunity to sell a variety of items to their "young clients" as well 
as parents, and plan and implement a Senior Citizens/Grandparents Day 
where the invitees were given lunch and a tour of the school. 

• This school year funding was received from the Massachusetts Department 
of Education as a result of a proposal written and submitted by Dr. Chrystal, 
the Superintendent of Schools, for curriculum analysis and revision. These 
funds allowed for hiring a consultant to undertake a computer curriculum needs 
assessment. The assessment provided us with a description of the computer 
curriculum in each school, hardware and software available, the level of teacher 
training, and recommendations to upgrade curriculum and equipment. This 
information resulted in the creation of a Computer Curriculum Committee under 
the aegis of Mrs. Sherry Matthiesen, Principal/Director of Learning at the 
Machon School. A target date of June 1 , 1990 for the presentation of computer 
curriculum K - 6 has been established. 

• An ever increasing number of parent volunteers in each of the elementary 
schools led to the development of 'first draft' booklets on volunteerism in the 
Hadley and Stanley schools. A major objective to be accomplished by June, 
1990 is to develop a booklet to be provided school volunteers systemwide. 
Benefits of a good school volunteer program include an increase in the 
educational achievement level of the students by providing additional help in 
the classroom and promoting a positive atmosphere for learning; and providing 
greater attention for individual students with needs requiring personal 
interaction, encouragement, assistance, and increased drill practice. 

• Students in Grades 4, 5, and 6 participated in the National Geographic 



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Geography Bee. Michael Elman, a grade six student at the Stanley School, 
received the highest score of those participating and as a result continued on 
to be a state finalist. 

• The Clarke School was approved by the School Committee as the site for two 
model programs. Extended Kindergarten and After School Programs began 
this September and will be reviewed at half year and end of year semesters. 
The programs are designed for working parents and are under the direction 
of Mrs. Deborah Gallant, a kindergarten teacher at the school and Early 
Childhood Instructor at Salem State College. 

• The ever increasing expansion of knowledge, as reflected in the proliferation 
of "knowledge industries" is a testament to the need for high impact 
professional growth programs for all personnel within the Swampscott Public 
Schools. It is for this reason that Mrs. Martha Cesarz, Principal/Director of 
Learning at the Stanley School, has been delegated responsibility for 
developing and, if financially realistic, implementing professional growth 
programs. Provision must be made for practicing educators to "re-tool" and 
"upgrade" their skills. The Superintendent of Schools authored a document 
on the issue of staff development focusing on this vital issue containing a long- 
range plan to meet staff needs. 

• Mr. Dennis Gunsher, grade 4 teacher at the Clarke School, was the recipient 
of the 1989 Massachusetts Alliance Arts Education Award. He was honored 
as one of only nine recipients on May 8 at the Annual Awards Luncheon in 
Worcester. His selection was based on his outstanding effort as director of 
the play "A Christmas Carol" and his effortless commitment to the inclusion 
and expansion of the arts in the curriculum. 

• Mrs. Lenore F. Kepler, a Clarke School Grade 6 teacher was chosen by the 
Council for Basic Education as a 1989 National CBE Fellow for Independent 
Study in the Humanities. She was the recipient of a $2800.00 stipend for a 
complete summer of independent study. Mrs. Kepler's selection was due to 
the exceptional quality of the professional plan she submitted when applying 
for the grant. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

The Junior High School experienced a dramatic change in the administrative 
leadership of the school. Mr. Michael Connolly submitted his resignation as 
principal in mid summer and a new principal, Mr. Ronald Landman, former Ipswich 
Middle School Principal, assumed the helm in early November. During the months 
of September and October, the Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Chrystal, assigned 
Mr. Leon Marden, retiring principal of the Hadley Elementary School, to the position 
of Acting Principal of the Junior High School. In addition, Mrs. Jacqueline Blanchard 
was appointed to the Central Office position of Director of Business and Personnel 
Administration and was replaced in the position of Assistant Principal by Mr. John 
Squires, 7th grade mathematics teacher. The new administration has been charged 
with the task of undertaking a needs assessment and submitting to the 
Superintendent no later than January 30, 1990, a report on the status of the school 
relative to curriculum, instruction, space, materials, equipment, and physical plant 
needs. 

• North Shore Community College Computer Grants were completed and funding 
obtained through the efforts of Ms. Constance Coleman, Mrs. Barbara Wills, 
and Mr. John Squires. Their efforts made possible the acquisition of new 
computer software in a number of the disciplines. 

• At the direction of. the Swampscott School Committee a Middle School Study 
Committee was formed for the purpose of gathering data, acquiring knowledge, 
and studying the merits of the middle school concept and structure as opposed 



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to a traditional junior high school concept. In response to the request made 
by the School Committee at their November 14, 1989 meeting, the study 
committee is to report back to the School Committee with the results of their 
study no later than February 28, 1990. 

• The students of Swampscott Junior High School continued to demonstrate the 
highest ideals of the humanitarian. Once again students in Ms. Virginia 
Crawford's social studies classes engaged themselves in a long-range project 
in which they prepared and served the needy at My Brother's Table in Lynn. 

• Mr. Joseph Balsama, head of the Science Department 7-12, and Mr. William 
Andrake, Junior High School Science teacher, received a Title II grant which 
provided funds to conduct a Marine Science Workshop during the summer. 
The workshop took place in the Marine Laboratory located on the third floor 
of the junior high school with 24 participants in attendance. 

• Mr. William Andrake was chosen as the recipient of the Swampscott Education 
Association Teacher of the Year Award The Association noted that Mr. Andrake 
had made a substantial impact on the student body at both the high school 
and junior high school through increasing the students' interest and study of 
the sciences. It was also noted that it was through his efforts that a Marine 
Science Resource Center was constructed that has resulted in staff and 
students from all schools taking field trips to the lab and performing a variety 
of marine biology experiments. One of the many uses of this "learning center" 
is its use as a facility for the Harbor Exploration Program and some of the 
samples obtained are analyzed at the Center rather than being transported 
to the University of Massachusetts. 

SWAMPSCOTT HIGH SCHOOL 

The curriculum at Swampscott High School continues to provide a strong 
comprehensive educational foundation for all high school students. Each year 
adjustments are made to accommodate changes in interest, shifts in enrollment, 
or technological advances in society. Below is a listing by department of the 
changes that occurred in 1989: 
Mathematics 

• New curriculum standards were adopted by the National Council of Teachers 
of Mathematics and began to impact on changes in the Math curriculum locally. 

English 

• The English Department met in a two-day workshop to coordinate its curriculum 
Grades 7-12. 

Practical Arts 

• Due to severe fiscal constraints, Home Economics was eliminated. 

• A new course in Graphic Arts began in January. 

• Two courses, Office Simulation and Clerical Office Practice Machines were 
combined into one five-credit course. 

• Changes in the Business Math and Accounting I courses are being made to 
utilize electronic calculators. 

• Students in the Office Sim/Clerical OP/OM course are gaining practical 
experience by working in the Athletic, Guidance, and Main Office as well as 
the Clarke School and the business community. 

• Child Development is not being offered this year due to fiscal constraints. 

• Electricity has been reinstated due to a high level of student interest. 
Science 

• Beginning in the Fall of 1989, the drop day was eliminated in the majority of 
laboratory science courses. As a result these courses are meeting seven times 
in a six-day cycle affording 16% more instructional time for our students. 

• We are continuing to replace chemistry texts in the two-level junior Chemistry course. 



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Foreign Language 

• Mrs. Patricia Shanahan will resume the Exchange Program established 
between Swampscott High School and students in Rouen, France. 

• Mrs. Bernice Mitchell organized a group of Spanish 4 students who were 
assigned to teach to elementry school children. The program met with such 
critical acclaim that plans are underway to expand the program. 

Fine Arts 

• Choral Music has been reinstated. 

• Murals on the walls of the high school have been started as a project for art 
classes. 

• Two students were chosen for the Massachusetts All State Arts Festival held 
at the Worcester Art Museum. 

• Three art students were given awards in the annual Globe Scholastic Art Awards 
Program. 

Social Studies 

• The Social Studies Curriculum Task Force issued its report and 
recommendations which in part was accepted and implemented by the 
department: recommendations to replace the present World History Course 
in Grade 8 with an American History Course and eliminate the two year U.S. 
History/Government sequence at the high school, thus allowing "0" level 
sophomores an opportunity to select Modern History. 

• New texts for Level One Modern History were acquired to bolster materials 
already in use. 

• Interdepartmental teaching and coordination is taking place between English 
and Social Studies at the freshman "0" Level and junior 1 -Level. 

Major Improvements in Equipment, Building, and Grounds 

The inability to replace old equipment and to purchase new equipment 
continues to be the source of concern for all departments at the high school. As 
technology continues to advance at a dizzying rate, the high school, by standing 
still, is actually moving backwards. The continued zero funding of the equipment 
line items will put Swampscott students st a distinct disadvantage upon entry into 
a workplace where the technological level of sophistication will suppress our 
students' ability to cope with demands placed on them. 

On a more positive note, greater attention is being paid to the appearance 
and integrity of the physical plant at the high school. An ongoing program of painting 
and repair, together with a renewed commitment to improve the quality of the 
working environment at the school by all members of the school community, is 
having a significant positive effect on the general atmosphere and climate of the 
school. 

Town Meeting has approved the purchase and installation of new lighting in 
the High School Little Theatre. However, we are still seeking funds to install speed 
bumps in the driveways and parking areas. Major deterioration of the tennis courts 
and playing fields continue to be a source of concern as well. 
Major or Interesting Events 

During the course of any school year, in addition to the daily routine of the 
school, there are significant events, activities, and accomplishments which stand 
out as marking one year as distinct from the rest. In 1989, there were numerous 
such instances. Included among them are the following: 

January 

• The Parent-Teacher Forum presented a tribute to Martin Luther King. 

• The Junior/Senior classes sponsored the first annual Junior/Senior "Night Out." 

• The High School Band and Chorus participated in the Annual Winter Music 
Concert. 

• The Drama Club presented Neil Simon's "The Odd Couple." 



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• The High School implemented for the first time its Mid-Year Examination 
Schedule. 

• Monthly release days have been conducted to allow the professional staff to 
work on the self-study phase of the accreditation process. 

February 

• The Parent-Teacher Forum presented a program dealing with the 1989-1990 
school department budget. 

• Swampscott High School students participated in the Harvard Model Congress. 

• The Drama Club presented the one act play "Next" in the Boston Globe High 
School Drama Festival. 

• The Student Council conducted their annual Carnation Sale on Valentine's Day. 

• The Parent-Teacher Forum presented a program entitled "The Accreditation 
Process." 

March 

• The sophomore Class went on a weekend ski trip. 

• Swampscott and Marblehead School Officials continued to discuss collaborative 
efforts between the two systems. 

• A special orientation program for the parents of eighth graders was conducted. 

• The Winter Boosters Sports Award Program was conducted. 

• The annual senior show was presented. 

April 

• The High School Spring Concert was presented in the Little Theatre. 

• The Hogan Party for the Mentally Retarded was held in the high school 
cafeteria. 

• Students conducted a Mock Town Meeting. 

• The Junior Prom was held at the Sheraton Tara in Danvers. 

May 

• Nine Seniors were recognized for academic excellence at the Annual Honor 
Scholars Night sponsored by the North Shore Chamber of Commerce. 

• Six Juniors competed in the Annual Mr. and Miss Lynn Area High School 
Pageant sponsored by the Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce. 

• Senior Melissa Goldstein was proclaimed essay winner in the Vanguard Essay 
Contest. 

• Students participated in the Annual Walk for Hunger. 

• Approximately forty student leaders received leadership training from the staff 
of Boston University's Sargent Camp. 

• The Student Council conducted another successful Blood Drive for the 
American Red Cross. 

• The School Committee held a Teacher Appreciation Day reception for all 
Swampscott faculty. 

• The Fine Arts Department presented its Annual Fine Arts Festival. 

• The Junior Class presented its annual show. 

• The annual underclassmen Student Recognition Ceremony was held in the 
high school gym. 

• The Senior Prom was held at the Montvale Plaza, Stoneham. 

June 

• The Marblehead Elks Club was the scene of the Senior Banquet and Award; 
Presentation. 

• The Animal Rights Club held a benefit concert in the high school gym. 

• Graduation exercises for the Class of 1989 were held at Blocksidge Field. 

• The Band presented its Annual Pops concert in the high school cafeteria. 



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The Spring Boosters Awards Program and Cookout was held in the high school 
cafeteria. 

September 

Varsity Sports Captains held an evening meeting for all athletes to discuss 
school and state athletic rules. 

The high school announced the names of four National Merit Semi-finalists 
and thirteen Commended Students. 

An orientation meeting for the parents of all freshmen was presented by 
Administration, Guidance, and Department Chairs. 

A Student Activity Fee of $25.00 is charged to all students participating in non- 
athletic extracurricular activities. 

October 

The newly formed High School Faculty Senate met with School Administration 
on matters of mutual concern. 

Swampscott High School welcomed approximately 400 parents to its Annual 
Open House. 

The International Relations Club conducted its two day Model United Nations. 
Foreign language students took a four-day trip to Quebec. 

November 

The ASVAB test was administered to interested students. 
November marked the official kickoff of the Toys for Local Children Campaign. 
WBZ's "A Time to Care Program" visited Swampscott High School. 
Twenty-seven students were inducted into the National Honor Society. 
The Parent Teacher Forum conducted a program on student motivation. 
Swampscott's Local Education Foundation, SUCCESS, Inc., held its first Board 
of Directors meeting. 

The Guidance Program "Playing the Selective College Admissions Game" 
is offered to interested parents. 

Freshmen visited Washington, D.C. accompanied by their American 
Government teachers. 

The Senior Class Spirit Dance ushered in Spirit Week. 

December 

The High School Jazz Band performed for parents and friends. 

The Guidance Department offered its Annual Financial Aid Night. 

The Boosters Club honored its Fall athletes at its triannual awards program. 

The World of Difference Program was offered to teachers during an early 

release day. 

College freshmen returned to discuss "The Freshman Experience" with high 
school seniors. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND ATHLETICS 

rriculum Efforts, Special Activities, and Events 

"Project Charlie" workshop was conducted in the fall with 12 new volunteers 
and the program continues to be offered in grades 2, 4, and 6 in each 
elementary school. CHARLIE, an acronym for Chemical Abuse Resolution Lies 
In Education is an integral part of the total health curriculum that was developed 
and implemented for grades K - 12. The program serves to enhance the self 
esteem of the primary and intermediate grade students and has been 
recognized as one of the most outstanding efforts in the Commonwealth for 
teaching youths to respect themselves. 



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• An "Adolescents Study Team" was established at Swampscott High School 
in order to assist students who may require emotional support. The program 
was designed in concert with Spofford Hall consultants and was supported 
by Mr. John McDevitt, Director of Guidance, K - 12; Mrs. Karen Baker, Assistant 
Principal; Mr. Peter Sack, Principal; Mr. Robert Trant, School Psychologist; 
Ms. Deborah Norling, Director of Pupil Personnel Services; Mr. Richard Baker, 
Director of Health, Physical Education, and Athletics; and the Superintendent 
of Schools, Dr. Richard K. Chrystal. The goal of the "Team" is to service 
students who, due to personal, family and/or social problems, either willingly 
seek help and/or who have been referred by staff members who deem 
assistance would be beneficial for the troubled student. 

• The first draft of the Physical Education Curriculum for Grades K - 6, developed 
and implemented last year, is currently in the evaluation stage. Based upon 
input from staff, wherein they identify the strengths and weaknesses, a second 
draft and final document will be prepared and distributed. Mr. Baker, Director, 
has the major responsibility for monitoring this effort. 

• As was referenced earlier in this report, the Keys to Excellence Program has 
been well received by staff members responsible for implementation of the 
program in the junior high school. Coupled with the CHARLIE Program in the 
elementary schools, we can proudly state that there exists an effective learner 
responsive K - 8 program, the purpose of which is to nurture and enhance the 
self-esteem of our young learners. 

• Northeastern Conference Champions was the title proudly borne by the Boys' 
Cross Country Team and the Girls' Spring Track Team. Tournament teams 
included Field Hockey, Boys' Tennis, Baseball, Girls' Basketball, Boys' Soccer, 
Girls' Tennis, and Ice Hockey. 

• The football "game of the year" that will be spoken of in years to come occurred 
on Saturday, October 28 when the Swampscott Big Blue defeated the previously 
undefeated Lynn English 13-8. In the last three seconds of the game, after 
recovering a fumble with no time outs remaining, a forty yard pass thrown and 
received resulted in an unbelievable touchdown and victory. The coaches and 
players received numerous accolades which were well deserved for "the game" 
and a season of excitement and sportsmanship. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The physical plant of each school is increasingly showing the years of neglect 
and the lack of maintenance. All Swampscott schools are in need of painting, 
improved electrical service, masonry work, locker replacement, ceiling repair, etc. 
Parts replacement also continues to be a major problem. Increased funds must 
be forthcoming in order that our schools remain safe and sound for the student 
body and the staff. 

As a result of a number of federal and state mandates and, indeed, the support 
of Town Meeting Members approving articles submitted to the Finance Committee 
by the Swampscott School Committee, a number of concerns were addressed. 
They are: (1) We continue to comply with the Asbestos Hazard Emergency 
Response Act (AH ERA) to remove all asbestos from school sites. (2) The on-going 
process of replacing outmoded windows and doors in our schools with energy 
conserving models continues. We anticipate this program will be maintained for 
several years. 

The following list identifies the projects undertaken in each school: 

Swampscott High School 

1 . In anticipation of the accreditation of Swampscott High School, corridors 
and classrooms are being painted. 



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2. The design contract has been awarded for the Little Theatre lighting. It 
is anticipated that new lighting will be installed in early 1990. 

3. Roof repair was completed. 

4. Pointing of walls in various locations of the high school was completed. 

Swampscott Junior High School 

1 . Painting of classrooms and corridors is an ongoing activity. 

2. School windows were replaced. These energy conservation windows will 
substantially lower maintenance and heating costs. 

Clarke School 

1 . Repairs to window screens 

2. Repairs to the generator 

Hadley School 

1 . Painting of classrooms and corridors 

2. School windows were replaced. These energy conservation windows will 
substantially lower maintenance and heating costs. 

Machon School 

1. The interior of the school was painted. 

2. A new ceiling was installed in the Library. 

3. New lighting was installed in the Library. 

4. The Library was painted by the principal, Mrs. Sheridan Matthiesen, and 
her son on a voluntary basis. 

5. A fence was installed around the dumpster per order of the Swampscott 
Health Department. 

6. A new intercom system was installed. 

Stanley School 

1 . Painting of classrooms and corridors was an ongoing effort. 

2. A new roof was placed on the old section of the school. 

3. A rain cap was placed on the chimney. 

4. A new intercom system was installed. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

In bringing closure to my third annual report, I wish to once again emphasize 
that expanding the concept of participatory decision-making and, wherever 
possible, decentralizing decision-making authority are the appropriate means for 
empowering professional staff. It is for this reason that the administration persists 
in its efforts to energize the position of school principal as instructional leader and 
as a director of learning. 

The school year 1988-1989 has been one in which the professional staff 
delivered a variety of services to an increasingly diversified student body with ever 
diminishing financial support. It is also the year in which the forecast of increased 
enrollment in the elementary schools became fact. These two events, increased 
enrollment and increased diversity, "flavor" the recommendations which follow. 
They will also serve as guideposts in our continuing effort to provide the best 
instructional program possible. 

RECOMMENDATION ONE: A Learner Responsive School System is our top 
priority. As more and more data reveal the changing family patterns and the altered 
nature of society and its values, we must respond by considering the need for: 

• Expansion of English as a Second Language Program 

• Transitional kindergarten centers in each elementary school 

• Self sustaining day care centers in each elementary school 

• Utilization of sophisticated technology, i.e. satellite learning, teleconferencing, 



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interactive video and voice activated computer systems. 
Every effort must be made to individualize and personalize the 
teaching/learning process in order to respond to an ever-changing, more mobile 
student body. 

RECOMMENDATION TWO: All individuals to be affected by a decision should 
be given the opportunity to participate, if they desire, in the process of making 
that decision. This is required if we wish to maintain a high level of morale and 
a productive learning environment. 

RECOMMENDATION THREE: Management Information Systems. An increased 
use of high technology can result in instantaneous retrieval of data. Such 
information will lead to improved decision making which enables us to maintain 
an effective and efficient delivery system of instructional services. 

RECOMMENDATION FOUR: Accountability. A greater emphasis on the 
management-by-objective process has been taken. The Superintendent of Schools 
has met with each central office administrator and building principal in order that 
mutually agreed upon objectives are established and achieved. All administrators 
are evaluated on their performance against the criteria established in the MBO 
conferences. Furthermore, the School Committee has received as part of their 
budget documentation the goals and objectives of the Administration for a three- 
year period. Finally, it should be noted that the Superintendent of Schools has 
his performance evaluated in an "open session" of a School Committee meeting. 
Nonetheless, as long as there persists even just one "doubting individual" who 
questions the veracity and/or performance of the school system leadership we 
will continue to make every effort to convey and to prove the "openness" of this 
administration. 

RECOMMENDATION FIVE: Curriculum/Instruction. The appointment of 
elementary school Principals/Directors of Learning and the funding, though 
extremely limited, of workshops as requested by social studies and language arts 
staff has resulted in an analysis of our computer, social studies, science, writing, 
reading, and fine arts curricula. The establishment of Curriculum Committees at 
the elementary level is the prelude to curriculum revision and textbook 
adoption/replacement. 

RECOMMENDATION SIX: A vital component of the teaching/learning process is 
the provision of professional growth and in-service programs for all staff based 
on identified needs by the staff, and mandated policies. The Swampscott Public 
School System, if it is to maintain its reputation as one of the leading school 
systems, must receive sufficient funding to enable it to provide the most up-to- 
date staff development workshops. 

RECOMMENDATION SEVEN: Changes in Society. Continuous scanning of the 
environment is an absolute necessity if we are to survive as a viable, productive 
school system. As an 'open system' it is our responsibility to respond to the external 
environment and when necessary adapt, modify, and revise. 

RECOMMENDATION EIGHT: Plant. As I stated last year, the physical plant is 
in need of major renovation and repair. Items in need of maintenance have too 
long been ignored. These items represent an anticipated expenditure of one to 
one and a half million dollars. 

CONCLUSION 

Once again as I bring to a close my annual report to the citizens of Swampscott, 
I am reminded of the support I have received from the staff of the Swampscott 



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Public Schools and from the citizenry of the Town of Swampscott. I am most 
thankful, and I express my gratitude to each. I will continue as energetically as 
is possible to achieve our mission - Fulfilling the Goal of Excellence. However, 
I would be less than truthful if I were not to forewarn the community that the funding 
of the school system is totally inadequate. Quality learning programs and exemplary 
instructional services do not come without financial expense. 

Some contend that declining enrollments should result in declining budgets. 
If only this were true. There are costs that we cannot control and that are unrelated 
to school enrollment. The rising cost of (1) learning materials, (2) fuel, (3) utilities, 
(4) insurance, (5) salaries, (6) equipment, (7) contracted maintenance, are 
examples. 

Therefore, I urge each citizen of Swampscott to consider supporting whatever 
action is necessary to provide the school system with increased financial 
assistance. This is an investment in our most valued resource, our children. 

Though this be a period of fiscal austerity, it is still the responsibility of the 
Superintendent of Schools to make every effort to maintain the trust and confidence 
placed in him by the public. I promise you that I will do all I can to assure that 
each child receives the best education we can provide. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Dr. Richard K. Chrystal 
Superintendent of Schools 
December 31, 1989 



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TRAFFIC STUDY COMMITTEE 



William H. McCarty, Chairman Michael A. Palleschi 

Louise La Conte Captain Paul DesRoches, Ex-Officio 

This committee has operated for three years with but two members. With the 
appointment of Louise La Conte to the Committee and Captain Des Rochers as 
Ex-Officio Police Representative, we will be able to operate as a full committee. 

We plan to monitor meetings of Town Boards when action affects traffic. We 
will review proposed developments and changes in existing property when 
requested or proposed. We will review articles submitted to the Town Warrant 
and submit any that the Committee deems desirable. 

We appreciate the support we have had in the past from the Selectmen and 
other Town Boards. We hope to continue to work with these Boards to assist them 
to minimize traffic problems in Town. 



VETERANS SERVICES 

Memorial Day 

On the 30th of May (Memorial Day) 1989 services commenced with an Outdoor 
Mass conducted at 10:00 a.m. by the clergy of St. John Evangelist Church. 
Following the Mass guests and celebrants were invited for refreshments served 
by parishioners. 

Ceremonies were then conducted at the War Memorials on Monument Avenue. 
Floral decorations were placed on the various Monuments. 

The Invocation and Benediction was given by Rev. David Strang of the First 
Congregational Church, Swampscott. 

Members of the Board of Selectmen spoke on behalf of the Town. Following 
the Military Ritual conducted by members of the VFW Post 1240 and the National 
Guard, Taps were sounded by Eric Austin, a member of the high school band. 

The procession then marched to the Swampscott Cemetery for continued 
services and decoration of graves. At the conclusion of the services, all participants 
were invited to an Open House at the VFW Post 1240 Headquarters on Pine Street. 

Veterans Day 

The annual observance of Veterans Day was conducted at the World War II 
Memorial on Monument Avenue at 11:00 a.m., November 11. 

The Rev. Robert Slater of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Greater Lynn 
offered Invocation and Benediction. 

Appropriate Military decorum was performed by members of the VFW Post 
1240 conducted by George Fitzhenry and the Color Guard. 

Each member of the Board of Selectmen spoke on behalf of the Town. The 
VFW Post 1240 invited all guests and participants to an Open House at the Post 
Headquarters on Pine Street. 

I would like to extend my thanks to Eric Austin, the bugler, for his continued 
dedication and participation in all of the Veterans Day and Memorial Day 
Observances over the last several years. An expression of thanks also to the Town 
of Swampscott for its continued support of the Veterans Program. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Charles H. Popp 
Veterans Agent 



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SWAMPSCOTT WAR MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Trustees 



Ernest Manchin, Chairman 
Joseph J. Balsama 
Philip A. Brine, Jr. 
David Sherman 



Mrs. Mary W. Cooper, Secretary 
Patsy J. Losano 
Charles H. Popp, Jr. 
Thomas B. White, Jr. 



Associate Trustees 



Paul E. Garland 
Keith L. Jordan 



James H. Lilly 
Daniel R. Santanello 



The Trustees are grateful to everyone who gave memorial gifts to this 
Scholarship Fund. The sole purpose of this Fund is to provide some financial 
assistance to present and future high school graduates of Swampscott who 
continue on to higher education. 

To each donor, by your donation, you have created your own perpetual 
scholarship to which you may add anytime you wish. 

DONATIONS FOR MY FAVORITE TEACHER MEMORIAL: Louise C. Stanley (The 
Stanley School is named for her); Ernest Manchin, Alice Durgin, Minnie Pagnotta. 

THE HONOR ROLL OF SPECIAL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: Christopher W. 
Ratley. a scholarship recipient (1965), in memory of his mother, Priscilla Waldo 
Papin. 

THE TWO SISTERS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS: In memory of Eleanor M. 
(Currie) Ludlam and A.M. Florence (Currie) Coraine. Their husbands, William A. 
Ludlam and Natale Coraine, both veterans of World War II, and others established 
the Scholarship. All four graduated from Swampscott High School. 

WAYFARERS MASONIC LODGE SCHOLARSHIP: In memory of their members 
(60 previously listed) Calvin Beebe, Clifford Beebe, T. Cooke, E. Coombs, Morris 
Crosby, Harry Davis, Ernest Erekson, Walter Forbes, Fred Gluck, Richard Gowell, 
Elwin Greeley, Eary Hatch, Kenneth Hussey, Pharus Jackson, Carl Lewis, John 
Lilly, Emry Manchin, Hyman Margolis, Fred Sargent, Frederick Stanger, L. Sullivan, 
Herbert Wyman, Jr. 

ALPHONSE AND MARIE C. CHIANCONE SCHOLARSHIP: Established by Marie 
C. Chiancone in honor of her husband. 

THE HONOR ROLL OF SPECIAL DONORS AND FUND RAISERS: Louise 
Benevento, Philip Brine, Jr., Phyllis Buccigrosso, Marie Corleto Chiancone. Paul 
DeBesse. Angelo Losano, William A. Ludlam, Ernest Manchin, John and Minnie 
Pagnotta, Mr. and Mrs. Vito Pierro, Joseph Pinto, David Sherman, Wayfarers Lodge 
of Masons. 

DONATIONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR HONORED THE MEMORY OF: 

Alice Hall Bell, Irene Cardin, Alphonse Chiancone, Theodore Cooke, Harry Davis, 
Peter Demakas, Charles DiCherico, Raymon DiPietro, Elizabeth Doane, President 
Dwight D. Eisenhower, Angeline C. Gannon, Frederic Gluck, Ernest Greeley, 
Kenneth Hussey, Joseph Lamorte, John Lilly, Henry, Sarah and James Manchin, 
Hyman Margolis, Ralph Mayo, Carl G. Olson, Mary Power, Charles Ring, Harold 
Rosenberg, Fred Sargent, Herbert Wyman, Jr., The two sisters, Eleanor (Currie) 
Ludlam and A. M. Florence (Currie) Coraine. 



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SEVEN TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS, TOTALING $2,300 WERE AWARDED AS 
FOLLOWS: 

$ 700 President George Washington Scholarship to Michelle Lilly 
$ 700 President Abraham Lincoln Scholarship to Paul Webster 
$ 300 Wayfarers Lodge of Masons to Jennifer Babbidge 
$ 300 Eleanor (Currie) Ludlam and A.M. Florence (Currie) Coraine 

Scholarship to Jay Dubb 
$ 300 Priscilla Waldo Papin Scholarship to Lisa Polando 
$ 200 Alphonse and Marie C. Chiancone Scholarship to Melissa Blood 

To date 165 Swampscott students have been awarded tuition scholarships 
totaling $42,700. The Memorial was established by vote of Town Meeting, March 28, 
1850. The total appropriated was $20,000. 

TO ALL DONORS: As this is a Perpetual Memorial, your donations will continue 
to provide for future scholarship awards to Swampscott students. You have created 
your own Scholarship Funds to which you may add at any time. Several meetings 
of the Trustees and a Subcommittee were held at the Public Library. The balance 
in the Fund as of December 31, 1989 was $74,512.94. 

Donations, which are tax deductible, may be made payable to the Swampscott 
War Memorial Scholarship Fund and sent to: Mr. Eanest Manchin, Chairman, 44 
Norfolk Avenue, Swampscott, MA 01907. 



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SERVICE TO TOWN 



On behalf of the citizens of Swampscott, the Board of Selectmen expresses 
appreciation to the following people who gave service to the Town and who 
resigned in 1989. 



AMBULANCE OVERSIGHT 
COMMITTEE 

Herbert C. Hagele, Jr. M.D. 
John F. Burke, Liaison 
Merrill I. Feldman, M. D. 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Peter R. Beatrice, III 
John V. Phelan. Ill 
James L. Rudolph 

ARTS COUNCIL 

Pam Matthias Peterson 

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

Jack L. Paster 

CENTRAL CIVILIAN DISPATCH 
COMMITTEE 

Thomas H. Driscoll, Chairman 
Robert A. Baker 
Walter A. Costello, Jr. 
Chris Drucas 
Ernest J. Mazola 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Kevin Gookin 

ASSISTANT HARBORMASTERS 

Richard F. Maitland 
Edward Publicover 
Carl D. Reardon 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Barbara Fulghum 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Gerald D. Freedman 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY REPAIRS 
AT PHILLIPS BEACH FIRE 
STATION 

Robert A. Baker 

CHIEF OF POLICE AND KEEPER OF 
THE LOCKUP 

Peter J. Cassidy 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Robert W. Snow 

RESIDENT/COMMUTER PARKING 
COMMITTEE 

Patricia Law Dutch 
Chief Peter J. Cassidy 
Joyce Evans 
Peter Olson 
Barbara Schaefer 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Donald M. Page 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

John F. Burke 
J. Christopher Callahan 
Lawrence Greenbaum 

SIGN BY-LAW COMMITTEE 

J. Christopher Callahan 
Louis A. Gallo 
Arthur J. Palleschi 
Bennett Parton 
Brian Watson 

WAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
FUND COMMITTEE 

Douglas F. Allen 

ASSISTANT WIRE INSPECTOR 

Robert E. Mclnerney 



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IN MEMORIAM 

Charles Chapman 
Dept. of Public Works: 25 years 
Retired: 1979 
Died: October 2. 1989 

Dorothy M. Collins 
Election Commissioner 
Died: March 23, 1989 

Thomas H. Driscoll 
Board of Selectmen: 1984-1989 
Died August 13, 1989 

Lillian Friedman 
Town Meeting Member 
Died: October 13, 1989 

John M. Lally 
Foreman, Dept. of Public Works 
Died: June 24, 1989 

John A. Lilly 
Member: War Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Died: June 14, 1989 

Judge Andrew W. Linscott 
Board of Selectmen: 1950-1951 
Town Meeting Member 
Library Trustee 
Died: September 14, 1989 

Alan MacDonald, Retired 
Firefighter: Fire Department 
Died: May 8, 1989 

Ralph Mayo, Retired 
Firefighter: Fire Department 
Died: August 16, 1989 

Erland S. Townsend, Jr. 
Chairman: Conservation Commission 
Town Meeting Member 
Alternate Building Inspector 
Died: December 14, 1989 

Jonathan Webster 
High School Teacher 
1975-1978 
Died: May 6, 1989 



-136- 



Index 

A 

Accountant 4 

Appointments by Selectmen 4 

Appointments by Selectmen and Moderator 8 

Assessors, Board of 4 

B 

Bargaining Agent 4 

Blockside Park Field House 9 

Building Inspector 4 

C 

Civil Defense Director 4 

Clerk/Collector 4 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 4 

Committees-Appointed by Selectmen 

Affirmative Action 5 

Ambulance Oversight 5 

Appeals, Zoning Board of 5 

Arts Council 5 

Bikeway 5 

Building Code Board of Appeals 5 

Cable Advisory 5 

Conservation Commission 6 

Council on Aging 5 

Design Selection 6 

Election Commissioners, Board of 6 

Fourth of July 6 

Harbor Advisory 6 

Historical Commission 6 

Installation of Automatic Sprinklers 6 

Insurance Advisory 6 

JFK Memorial Statue Fund 6 

Memorial Day 6 

Recreation Commission 6 

Resident/Commuter Parking 6 

Safety/Security 6 

Traffic 6 

Veterans Day 6 

Vietnam Memorial 6 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund 6 

Committees-Appointed by Moderator 

Capital Improvements 7 

Finance 7 

Phillips Beach Fire Station 7 

Regional School District Planning 7 

Roland C. Booma Rink 7 

Salary Study 7 

Sawtelle Property/Phillips Park Complex 7 

Constables 4 

Contributory Retirement Board 8 



-137- 



Town Counsel 4 

D 

Data Processing Coordinator 5 

Democratic Town Committee 10 

Dog Officer/Animal Control 4 

E 

Elected Officials 4 

Election Commissioners, Board of 6 

Emergency Planning Commission 8 

F 

Fence Viewers 4 

Fire Department 5 

Forest Warden 5 

G 

Gas & Plumbing Inspector 8 

General Information 3 

Group Insurance Advisory Committee 9 

H 

Harbormaster 5 

Health, Board of 4 

Health Officer 8 

Housing Authority 4 

In Memoriam 136 

M 

Moderator 4 

P 

Parking Agent 5 

Personnel Board 8 

Planning Board 4 

Police Department 5 

Public Works, Board of 4 

Public Works, Superintendent 8 

R 

Reports 

Accounting Department 49 

Ambulance Oversight Committee 79 

Appeals, Board of 80 

Assessors, Board of 81 

Blockside Field House Study Committee 85 

Building Inspector 84 

Cable Advisory Committee 86 

Civil Defense, Department of 86 

Town Clerk 14 

Town Collector 47 

Conservation Commission 87 

Council on Aging 87 

Town Counsel 110 

Design Selection Committee 88 

Dog Officer/Animal Control 80 



- 138- 



Election Commissioners, Board of 89 

Fire Department 93 

Forest Warden 94 

Fourth of July Committee 94 

Harbormaster 95 

Health, Board of 97 

Historical Commission 99 

Housing Authority 96 

Library, Trustees of Public 1 00 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 102 

Personnel Board 85 

Phillips Beach Fire Station Study Committee 101 

Planning Board 99 

Police Department 103 

Public Works, Department of 108 

Recreation Commission 109 

Regional School District Planning Committee 110 

School Department 111 

Selectmen, Board of 12 

Town Treasurer 48 

Traffic Study Committee 132 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 96 

Veterans Services, Department of 132 

War Memorial Scholarship Fund 133 

Wires, Inspector of 98 

Recreation Commission 6 

Representatives, Liaisons, Designees, Coordinators 7 

Republican Town Committee 11 

Roland Jackson Medical Scholarship 8 

S 

School Committee 4 

Selectmen, Board of 4 

Service to Town 125 

Shellfish Constable 5 

Smoke, Inspector 4 

T 

Telephone Numbers Inside Back Cover 

Town Meeting Members 40 

Treasurer 4 

Tree Warden 5 

Trustees of Public Library 4 

V 

Veterans Agent 5 

W 

Warrant 16 

Weights and Measures Inspector 5 

White Court/Marian Court Inside Front Cover 

Wire Inspector 5 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 5 



-139- 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



Notes 



FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS AMBULANCE 595-1111 

CIVIL DEFENSE 598-5231 

FIRE 592-2121 

POLICE 595-1111 

INFORMATION ABOUT: CALL: AT: 

Assessments Assessors 596-8858 

Bicycle Licenses Police 595-1 1 1 1 

Bills and Accounts Town Accountant 596-8859 

Birth Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Board of Appeals Clerk of Board 595-5393 

Building Permits Building Inspector 596-8857 

Burial Permits Health Department 596-8864 or -8865 

Cemetery Cemetery Superintendent 596-8863 

Checks Town Treasurer 596-8852 

Conservation Conservation Commission 596-8853 

Council on Aging Council on Aging 596-8866 

Death Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Dog Licenses Town Clerk 596-8856 

Dogs-Lost and Found Dog Officer 595-0651 

Elections and Registrations Election Commissioners 596-8855 

Engineering Town Engineer 596-8862 

Entertainment Licenses Selectmen 596-8850 

Fire Permits Fire Department 595-4050 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Town Clerk 596-8856 

Garbage Collections Health Department 596-8864 or -8865 

Gas Permits Health Department 596-8864 or -8865 

Housing Authority Executive Director 593-5516 

Library Public Library 596-8867 

Lights, Street Selectmen 596-8850 

Liquor Licenses Selectmen 596-8850 

Marriage Certificates Town Clerk 596-8856 

Milk Inspection Health Department 596-8864 or -8865 

Mortgages, Personal Property Town Clerk 596-8856 

Parks and Playgrounds Public Works 586-8860 

Plumbing Permits Plumbing Inspector 593-8228 

Recreation Recreation Commission 596-8854 

Resident Listing Elections Commissioners 596-8855 

Rubbish Collection Health Department 596-8864 or -8865 

Schools School Department 596-8800 

Sewers Public Works 586-8860 

Streets Public Works 586-8860 

Tax Collections Tax Collector 596-8856 

Tennis Permits Recreation Commission 596-8854 

Trees Public Works 586-8860 

Veterans' Benefits Veterans' Services Department . . . 596-8853 

Voting Registration Election Commissioners 596-8855 

Water Public Works 586-8860 

Weights and Measures Inspector 593-5476 

Wiring Permits Wire Inspector 596-8857 

Zoning Building Inspector 596-8857